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Jpenguin

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Amazing true crime podcast

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-02

Devoured this true crime podcast that clearly and powerfully outlines the story of the investigation into the Golden State Killer. A couple of phone interviews unfortunately had poor sound quality but overall it was a gripping series.

The world of Chili Heads is Bananas

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-06-20

In "It Burns" Australian journalist Marc Fennell takes us into the wild world of competitive chili pepper growing and eating. And it is bananas. There are allegations of fraudulent lab testing, people driven to repeatedly videotape themselves while eating peppers so hot they vomit, competitions that keep going through flash flooding events, and much more. Fennell is an entertaining narrator, though I wonder whether he's too focused on the "self-harm" angle that these Chili Heads are working off other types of pain or trauma by essentially poisoning themselves with ridiculous amounts of capsaicin. Some of the "next episode" previews at the end were also a little misleading. But overall I'm a big fan of this podcast and would recommend it if you're into podcasts about cults or weird pastimes.

An important and enjoyable read

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-03-10

Thomas King's The Inconvenient Indian isn't your usual history book. It's a personal, often sardonic look at the history of Indigenous people in North America from colonization to now, with pitch-perfect narration by indigenous actor Lorne Cardinal. King's narrative flows outside a strict chronology, interspersing concerns about Native American representation in film with discussions of historic displacements of Native Americans and Inuit, residential schools, land claims and more. It's accessible and inspiring - a must-read for anyone who cares about Indigenous justice, or doesn't yet know why they should care.

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Powerful, thought-provoking, brilliantly narrated

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-10-25

Sharon Bala's The Boat People puts you in the shoes of Mahindan, a Tamil refugee father fleeing to Canada with his young son, a young woman articling student of Tamil descent who's pulled into defending the migrants, and a Japanese-Canadian Conservative hack who gets more than she bargains for when she accepts a political appointment to adjudicate refugee claims. Through the book we see each character making tough choices and weighing competing motivations, with Mahindan's journey at the heart of the story.

This book gives the reader a powerful and invaluable opportunity to understand the impossible choices a refugee may have to make just in order to survive, and to reconsider the choices we might make were we in the shoes of the adjudicator. It's an opportunity to consider Canada's historic racism and its parallels in our immigration system today.

Athena Karkanis does an amazing job narrating the audiobook version, respectfully voicing characters from a range of different backgrounds.

A hopeful, funny, feminist memoir

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-09-14

Mara Wilson's Where Am I Now? is a collection of stories that spans her life from her childhood in movies like Mrs. Doubtfire and Matilda to her more recent years struggling to find her place in the world as an adult and a performer. Wilson's writing is straightforward, conversational and honest - even if you didn't grow up like she did you will probably find an experience that resonates, whether it's weird childhood misconceptions about sex, highschool cliques, or mental health challenges.

I enjoyed hearing Wilson narrate the stories in her own voice, particularly the times when she (sparingly and effectively) uses accents and voices reading others' dialogue. But I think it felt a bit more serious than it would have had I just read the book. It was hard to laugh even at the funniest parts of this book when the story was being read and there was no indication whether those parts were meant to be funny. But overall I enjoyed the book and the hopeful, feminist messages therein. #Audible1

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

A timely, enjoyable read

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-09-13

Thomas King's The Back of the Turtle is a rare gem that explores topical themes like environmental destruction, corporate corruption, and the legacy of colonialism without letting the reader lose hope. The book takes place after an environmental catastrophe has destroyed a small coastal town, driving away the turtles and the tourists, killing residents of the local reserve and leaving much of the area deserted.

With wit and tenderness, and copious references to both Shakespeare and Indigenous myth, King weaves together the stories of a CEO who finds fulfillment in conspicuous consumption; an Indigenous scientist fleeing the horrors he's created; a woman who returns to the reserve where she grew up; a young man who hasn't been the same since the town's ecology and economy collapsed, and a Puck-like older man who seems to know just what all the other characters need to know. Oh, and a mysterious and important dog. A good choice for thoughtful vacation reading. #Audible1

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Funny, meta romp for sci-fi fans

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
3 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-09-13

Redshirts is a funny, action-packed, meta romp through the lives of a group of random, bit-part ensigns on a Star Trek-like series. The protagonist, Andrew Dahl, arrives on the Intrepid with his friends only to find something very weird going on: everyone seems to be trying to avoid going on away missions after random incidents (including run-ins with alien diseases, land worms and ice sharks) keep killing the other low-ranking crew.

I loved the first two-thirds of this book as Dahl and friends investigate their colleagues' mysterious behaviour and try to survive bizarre away missions. I found myself laughing out loud at the loving fun this book pokes at Trek and other sci-fi tropes. And the story itself was hard to put down. How would Dahl and co. stop the redshirt slaughter?

But I think I would've preferred this as a novella without the three lengthy "Coda" chapters at the end. These only helped to reinforce messages I felt were already pretty clear, answer questions I was fine not knowing the answers to, and round out characters I don't know really needed more dimension. As I listened to the audiobook, this last two hours of the book felt like a slog after what had otherwise been an enjoyable cruise.

I did really enjoy Wil Wheaton as audiobook narrator. His tone reading the dialogue was pitch-perfect, capturing the essence of crewmembers like Hester and Captain Abernathy without needing to do voices. #Audible1