AUDITEUR

Jamie @ Books and Ladders

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  • 7
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  • 31
  • évaluations
  • Grey Sister

  • Auteur(s): Mark Lawrence
  • Narrateur(s): Heather O'Neill
  • Durée: 15 h et 47 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Histoire
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43

Behind its walls, the Convent of Sweet Mercy has trained young girls to hone their skills for centuries. In Mystic Class, Novice Nona Grey has begun to learn the secrets of the universe. But so often even the deepest truths just make our choices harder. Before she leaves the convent, Nona must choose which order to dedicate herself to - and whether her path will lead to a life of prayer and service or one of the blade and the fist. All that stands between her and these choices are the pride of a thwarted assassin, the designs of a would-be empress wielding the Inquisition like a knife, and the vengeance of the empire's richest lord.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love this Sequel!

  • Écrit par Jamie @ Books and Ladders le 2018-08-13

Love this Sequel!

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-08-13

I really loved that this book had the same amount of action and had the characters face new challenges without making them too difficult or levelling the characters up too much. I thought this was a perfect middle novel in a series but I definitely don't want the series to end! I can't wait to pick up the rest of Mark Lawrence's books because if they are even half as good as this, I'm in for an amazing story.

I loved the way that this story started, with Lawrence giving us a recap of the last book so we could just move right along to this one. I also liked the time jump. It felt natural without making us question too much. I think Nona really stepped up her game in this one without being Too Much.

A lot of middle books don't know how to take what was good about the first and make it into something similar but different for the second without losing the interest of the audience. This is not the case here. It was such a perfect bridge between the first book and what I expect the last to be.

I think this is shaping up to be my new favourite fantasy series and I highly recommend it if you want to get into Adult Fantasy.

  • The Selection

  • The Selection, Book 1
  • Auteur(s): Kiera Cass
  • Narrateur(s): Amy Rubinate
  • Durée: 8 h et 7 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Histoire
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

For 35 girls, the Selection is the chance of a lifetime: the opportunity to escape the life laid out for them since birth... to be swept up in a world of glittering gowns and priceless jewels... to live in a palace and compete for the heart of gorgeous Prince Maxon. But for America Singer, being Selected is a nightmare. It means turning her back on her secret love with Aspen, who is a caste below her, and leaving her home to enter a fierce competition for a crown she doesn't want.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not For Me

  • Écrit par Jamie @ Books and Ladders le 2018-07-30

Not For Me

Au global
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Histoire
2 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-30

Depicted to me as "The Hunger Games" meets "The Bachelor," I was really excited to read this one. I mean come on, 35 girls fighting to the death over the love of one guy? Yes please. And I heard so many good things and this is like everyone's favourite series of all time, so I thought I would give it a chance. Boy was I disappointed.

I feel like a lot of the problem stemmed from the fact that I wanted to like America, I just literally could not stand her. I think part of it was her name because when Aspen said "Mer" I was like "Murica" in my head and started laughing. Every time she would say she "still loved Aspen" or think about how awesome Maxon was, I would roll my eyes. They were both literally the most boring people in the world. Not that any of the characters were any better, they were all literally blank slates with one or two "interesting" qualities to make them "stand out" from the competition.

Marlie was so interesting and then became so boring. Having a secret does not make someone interesting if they don't ever share that secret with you. Especially after a couple weeks of waiting and wondering. It just made me annoyed that this secret wasn't being shared. The other girls were so boring and I think it is stupid af that he kept Celeste

The info-dump of the history of the land in the middle of the book was a wtf moment for me. Especially since America didn't know it all and was like "why don't we write history down anymore when I still have an old US History textbook at home." Like k girl. And the rebels were just ridiculous. They were supposed to be threatening and everything should feel tense and on the brink of war, but I just felt like they were reasons to get everyone into the same room and then kick people off the island at the end to make it more of an intense scenario.

Also. WTF with the virginity thing? Like why is it a law that they have to be virgins until marriage. That is actually ridiculous. And the fact that men can marry down castes and keep their number but women can't???? That itself almost made me stop reading to the book because wtf. Like I was fuming with that. Why is that the only world building we got??

I feel like instead of being "friends" with Maxon, I wanted America to fill him in on gossip about the girls to help him make his choice. She should have been looking for things that made each girl someone he would want to marry/love/whatever instead of being his "friend". Which, ps, she was not a very good friend. Yeah, they talked and yeah, he could "trust" her, but they didn't really talk about him when they wer together, just her and her issues. What a shitty friend.

Overall: Maybe a 2.5, but for sure a 2/5 on this one for me. I just did not enjoy it. I thought it would at least have one or two petty cat fights and more interesting characters instead of just making me want to vomit every time they kept complimenting one another and saying "well if *I* don't win, YOU should" puh-lease.

1 personnes sur 1 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Mitosis

  • A Reckoners Story
  • Auteur(s): Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrateur(s): MacLeod Andrews
  • Durée: 1 h et 3 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Histoire
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Words of Radiance, coauthor of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series and creator of the internationally bestselling Mistborn Trilogy, Brandon Sanderson comes Mitosis, a short story set in the action-packed world of Steelheart: the Reckoners series, exclusively available in the digital format. Epics still plague Newcago, but David and the Reckoners have vowed to fight back.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Novella!

  • Écrit par Jamie @ Books and Ladders le 2018-07-30

Great Novella!

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
3 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-30

I am typically weary of novellas because I am not a fan of authors making these novellas necessary to read and purchase to understand the story. I like when they are just additions to the story to give avid fans of the story more to read if they choose to. That is exactly what Mitosis was.

Mitosis wasn't a necessary read (well, listen since I had it as an audiobook), but it did give us just a little bit of an insight as to what David and the Reckoners are doing in the interim between the end of Steelheart and presumably the beginning of Firefight (but I have yet to read that one). I liked that we got to see more of David and his irresponsible heroism; it wasn't necessary for me to read this one to know that about him though, which is probably what I liked the most.

My favourite part of this was the idea that Newcago is changing for the better: more people are trusting that the Reckoners will be able to protect them from any and all Epics. But I do think that will bite them in the ass in Firefight.

Overall: 3.5/5 stars. This one just made me all the more excited to read Firefight! I should really go pick up a copy... I would suggest reading or listening to this one -- it is a good refresher to the story before you read Firefight, but it isn't necessary to read it in my opinion. It doesn't lead into what the big bad will be in the next one or give you a "dream" or "prophecy" that is necessary to understand the stories like some other books I could mention...

  • Rebel Belle

  • Auteur(s): Rachel Hawkins
  • Narrateur(s): Amy Rubinate
  • Durée: 9 h et 22 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars 4

Harper Price, peerless Southern belle, was born ready for a Homecoming tiara. But after a strange run-in at the dance imbues her with incredible abilities, Harper's destiny takes a turn for the seriously weird. She becomes a Paladin, one of an ancient line of guardians with agility, super strength and lethal fighting instincts.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Rachel Hawkins Delivers Again!

  • Écrit par Jamie @ Books and Ladders le 2018-07-27

Rachel Hawkins Delivers Again!

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-27

I loved Rachel Hawkins first series Hex Hall and Rebel Belle promises to deliver the same sort of laugh-out-loud situations while still being swoon-worthy and full of action. (Also, Rachel Hawkins is really nice and these covers are really pretty so you should go buy a copy of this book). Please note that I listened to this as an audiobook while following along in a physical copy which made the book that much more fun because I got the “voices” of the characters and felt that much more connected to them. However, Hawkins’ books are always a blast to read and really easy to get into, so I will always recommend them.

Harper is your typical Queen Bee. She has her hands in everything and wants to make the school experience great not only for herself but also for everyone else who attends. But this hits a snag when she watches a janitor die and gains amazing fighting powers. One of the best parts about Harper’s character was seeing her grow into accepting her responsibilities. She was such a strong character without the abilities because she was always taking on more than she probably should have so that everything would be Perfect™. I really liked being inside her head because it was nice to see her thought patterns around how she was supposed to act versus how she was acting. I also liked seeing her start to freak out and really being herself at the end. It was nice to see that some situations call for you to tell people to get in line and follow suit rather than to just be polite and nice. I could really connect to Harper throughout this novel and think I will be able to in the future as well.

The plot was really great as well. I liked seeing it unfold and that this novel had it’s own arc but also had plot points for the future books as well. I liked that there were tidbits of what we can hope to expect in the future without giving too much away for the readers while also keeping us intrigued and wanting to continue the story. I thought the ending was a bit unfortunate in a way but also pretty great. I am excited to see what the next book brings. I think the overall story idea is one that I wouldn’t trust anyone but Rachel Hawkins to write and deliver perfectly to us.

I liked the relationships that Harper had with Ryan and David. I think they both felt realistic and had good natural progression. I liked that Ryan was portrayed as a good boyfriend rather than an asshole Harper had to get away from. I also really liked that they both came to the conclusion that they would be better off NOT being together rather than sticking it out. I think it will be an interesting dynamic in the next book between the three of them.

I just felt like Blythe was a little underdeveloped. She was introduced a bit too late and wasn’t given enough screen time for me to connect to her as a villain. I hope there will be more of her in the next book, as well as more of an explanation of what her group actually wants. I think there was a bit of a hint at it, but not quite enough for me to be fully hooked. I think the rest of the book and characters made up for that lack of villainous behaviour however. And while I understand that Blythe doesn’t feel like she is a villain, I would have liked to see just a bit more from her so I could see why I should feel more than indifference towards her.

Overall a really good introduction to what promises to be another fantastic series by Rachel Hawkins.

  • The Name of the Wind

  • (Kingkiller Chronicle, Book 1)
  • Auteur(s): Patrick Rothfuss
  • Narrateur(s): Nick Podehl
  • Durée: 27 h et 55 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1 052
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 984
  • Histoire
    4.5 out of 5 stars 987

This is a tale of sorrow, a tale of survival, a tale of one man's search for meaning in his universe, and how that search, and the indomitable will that drove it, gave birth to a legend.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't read it.

  • Écrit par Mark le 2018-09-18

Not For Me

Au global
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
2 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-27

I listened to this as an audiobook and I would suggest that you do the same. The narrator was very good and probably the only reason I actually made it to the end of this 18 hour novel. And I saw it was the same narrator for the next one so I almost picked it up but it is 42 hours and I really don't care enough to listen about this pompous douche for another two days. Also, I would have had zero idea how to say Kvothe if it hadn't been for the narration, so yes, I recommend it as an audiobook, but not as an actual novel.

Honestly, my main issue with this one is that I didn't get why this story was so important to be told. At the beginning of the book, we aren't given much back story to Kvothe except the tiny tidbits that the Chronicler gives us as to why he was searching for him. And this is BARE MINIMUM. I knew basically the guy's name. That's it. And that's fine if you are going to tell an interesting story, but oh my god. This was not interesting. I realize that it is over the course of three days so of course the first little bit isn't going to be the most interesting part of the story, but it was so boring I was almost in tears. I didn't (and still don't) care that Kvothe is the specialist little snowflake in the world and so super duper smart and awesome at everything he does and is just so awesome and AWESOME. Like I do not care. I wanted him to have interesting merits, not just be amazing because he is the main character. He has like zero flaws in this story except sometimes he has a bit of a temper and does things without necessarily thinking, but OMG. I could not STAND HIM.

At like 95%, a story is told about Kvothe from an outsider's perspective that really beefs him up to seem (even more) awesome and I wish with all my heart that this had been told at the beginning of the story (instead of whatever meaningless story had been told by that old dude at the beginning) because then I would have been interested in learning more about Kvothe. But even so, this story is so slow. SO SLOW. We learn like 16 years of his life in this book and all the "action" you are expecting and promised? Doesn't happen. There are maybe two interesting things that happen during the course of this novel and one of them is during an interlude.

And oh god the interludes. They do nothing but remind you there are other people around. It is a little jarring to be taken out of the story to go to the present that I just couldn't handle it. Because nothing happened during this time?? Like only at the final interlude did something "important" to the story happen, and even that was minimal imo. I feel like this book serves no purpose other than to get us to the next book. But Kvothe isn't interesting enough to make me want to even look at the next novel, let alone read (or listen) to it.

I am so disappointed by this. It has SUCH a high Goodreads rating and is typically the kind of book I THRIVE on. But no, instead we get a douche of a main character, a stupid ass love interest, and a sad but boring childhood that made me want to tear my eyes out (even though I was listening). I was hoping for something more magical and more .. interesting, but instead all I got was disappointment and apathy.

  • The Sleeper and the Spindle

  • Auteur(s): Neil Gaiman
  • Narrateur(s): Julian Rhind-Tutt, Lara Pulver, Niamh Walsh
  • Durée: 1 h et 6 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2
  • Histoire
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2

You may think you know this story. There's a young queen about to be married. There are some good, brave, hardy dwarfs; a castle shrouded in thorns; and a princess cursed by a witch, so rumor has it, to sleep forever. But no one is waiting for a noble prince to appear on his trusty steed here. This fairy tale is spun with a thread of dark magic, which twists and turns and glints and shines.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Pretty Good

  • Écrit par Jamie @ Books and Ladders le 2018-07-27

Pretty Good

Au global
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
3 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-27

This is good and I quite enjoyed the audio, but I'm not 100% sold on it. I think part of my problem is it was quite short and had it been longer I could have fully connected to the story better. I really liked the idea that the princesses basically saved themselves in this one and that it was about love and power but I just think that there could have been something more to really wow me. I did like the twists on the original fairy tales and think that Gaiman did something great in what he differed and what he kept the same, but I'm still meh about it. It was good, but not great.

  • Dove Arising

  • Auteur(s): Karen Bao
  • Narrateur(s): Kim Mai Guest
  • Durée: 9 h et 44 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars 1

Phaet Theta has lived her whole life in a colony on the moon. She's barely spoken since her father died in an accident nine years ago. She cultivates the plants in Greenhouse 22, lets her best friend talk for her, and stays off the government's radar. Then her mother is arrested. The only way to save her younger siblings from the degrading shelter is to enlist in the militia, the faceless army that polices the lunar bases and protects them from attacks by desperate Earth dwellers.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not For Me

  • Écrit par Jamie @ Books and Ladders le 2018-07-27

Not For Me

Au global
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
2 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-27

I don't even know where to start with this one, tbh. It seemed like it was going to be a pretty solid book. I had ~some~ issues with it at the beginning, but not enough to take away from my enjoyment of reading (or I guess, listening, since I had an audiobook). However, after her mother's trial, at like 75%, the book took a nosedive.

I think the main problem for me was the pacing. I liked that there wasn't too much time spent on the military training, but some of that felt too rushed. The reader needed a bit more time to understand what the military was about and why Phaet was pretty much selling her soul to the devil to join the military. As well, I felt like I didn't understand the full purpose of the training. It seemed like pretty standard and generic military training but I feel like there should have been more space related training to make it a bit more plausible considering they lived on the moon. I just feel like there was something lacking in the military training, considering it was such an important part of Phaet's character growth.

It was pretty obvious that there was a rebellion but considering we didn't learn about it until 75% through the novel, specifically at her mother's trial, it seemed to really come out of nowhere. And the reasoning behind it was kinda confusing. I THINK it was about the fact that wealth isn't distributed equally -- or as equally as it could be -- but they seemed to put a lot of emphasis on the fact that the Earth's history wasn't a part of THEIR history. It was weird. And just everything after that made me dislike the book more and more and more. I think I would have liked it more if we knew about the rebellion at the beginning .. or if it had more ... meaning.

The OTHER thing we learn about at the end is much more interesting than the rebellion, but because of the timing, it just made me roll my eyes even more than I previously had. I am just IDK MAN. This one is okay but it's not that good. I think the author had some good ideas but the execution just didn't work for me.

I also didn't really like Phaet's relationship with Umbriel because it seemed like he wanted one thing and she wasn't really sure what she wanted, but went along with what he wanted so she didn't hurt his feelings. It irked the crap out of me. At the end she is like "I'm glad I just nodded and didn't verbally agree to being TOGETHER with him" and I was like confused because 1. she had already promised to be with him before but wasn't feeling it, just thought it would be good for her family and 2. she was running off with another guy. I didn't really like Umbriel to begin with but his interactions with her and the way he spoke to her as if she owed him a relationship because he was nice to her were really off-putting.

But that doesn't mean I like Wes either. Is he better than Umbriel? By a small margin and only because we have to compare them. But Wes like idk he was basically a paper towel to me: useful in some cases but might as well throw it out after use. He was like a knock off Four imo but okay we can roll with it. If it switches into his perspective, at least we know what Phaet's fate is (ha ha, see what I did there. Okay I'm going now)

I guess most of my problems revolved around the pacing but also the lack of communication to the audience about what was happening. I just feel like so much more could have been explained -- and there was ample opportunity to do so -- and it just wasn't so it could be "shocking" and a "plot twist" (I guess?) but instead it just left me wondering what was happening and why there weren't more hints from the beginning. I also am not sure how I feel about the "romance"? Both felt so forced and I just couldn't deal with it. Anyway, I don't know if I would necessarily recommend this one. It is a pretty standard dystopian novel that doesn't really add a whole lot to the genre in my opinion. I think if I had been reading and not listening to this one, I wouldn't have finished it.

  • Seveneves

  • A Novel
  • Auteur(s): Neal Stephenson
  • Narrateur(s): Mary Robinette Kowal, Will Damron
  • Durée: 31 h et 55 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Histoire
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111

A catastrophic event renders the earth a ticking time bomb. In a feverish race against the inevitable, nations around the globe band together to devise an ambitious plan to ensure the survival of humanity far beyond our atmosphere, in outer space.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing! Would have made a better novella

  • Écrit par shawn ellis le 2018-05-04

Not For Me

Au global
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
1 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-27

I have lots of Thoughts about the last 40% of the book. because up until then, everything was pretty good. Sure there was some slow pacing issues and definitely not enough deaths, but it was an interesting take on End of the World SciFi. But then... *sighs* okay I didn't want to do this on my phone because it's a pain to type but there is a conversation at about 65% of the way through the novel after the Big Action Sequence where the women are figuring out how to repopulate the environment and we find out that two of these women have mental illnesses.

Which, wow! rep! except they are BOTH the villains and they both talk about their illnesses like accessories that make them Cool and they are both seen as evil, although the one with Bipolar Disorder is seen as more evil than the one with Depression. And there is some Science Talk about how they can eliminate all these diseases from the embryos so that the future generations can be free of them and I just was not okay with it?

They also were eliminating some other medical diseases that would cause "issues" in breeding because they were such a small population and it was gross and ableist and I couldn't handle it. but I continued and the last section was a bad version of The 100 so idk why I even bothered continuing on from there. I want those 32 hours of my life back please.

0 personnes sur 1 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • The Great Hunt

  • Auteur(s): Wendy Higgins
  • Narrateur(s): Saskia Maarleveld
  • Durée: 9 h
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars 1

When a monstrous beast attacks in Eurona, desperate measures must be taken. The king sends a proclamation to the best and bravest hunters: Whoever kills the creature will win the hand of his daughter, Princess Aerity, as a reward. The princess recognizes her duty but cannot bear the idea of marrying a stranger - she was meant to marry for love - until a brooding local hunter, Paxton Seabolt, catches her attention.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not For Me

  • Écrit par Jamie @ Books and Ladders le 2018-07-27

Not For Me

Au global
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
2 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-27

Please Note: I wrote this as a joint review with my best friend since we buddy read it together!

We really did not like this one. We both rated it two stars and had a lot of issues with it. There were barely any redeeming qualities to this one. Jamie really liked that the girls were supportive of one another in their emotions and feelings; however, they were always discussing boys rather than how their lives were affected. Granted, Wyneth’s fiancé was eaten by the beast and Aerity had to marry someone she didn’t necessarily love, but there was so much more happening that they could have discussed. Dani felt sorry for the King because he had to do something he didn’t necessarily want to do: marry his daughter off to someone for diplomacy.

There are two real reasons we both didn’t like it, tbh, but they are HUGE and made it really difficult to enjoy. One is that the world-building was a little lacking, and the second is the men in this story. With the world-building, it seemed as though we were just expected to know the things that Aerity and company knew, mostly when it came to how the magic was used and what it meant. We were really confused when we were getting the perspectives on how magic is used. We understood that there is general fear of the unknown, and therefore magic would be feared in this land, however, it just didn’t quite work for us. It felt like there was a piece of the puzzle missing for it to all click together to make a beautiful masterpiece. And the “enemy” kinda came out of the blue, but we think she would have made more sense if we understood just a BIT MORE about the magic in the world.

The world itself didn’t make sense; it should have been hundreds of miles between locations, but they could travel there so easily, especially with the climate changes. Too much climate change variety for the amount of space. It seemed like the author had taken Scandinavians, Scottish, Arabic, and African cultures and lands and meshed them together on one small island, but there was no basis for it.

Secondly, all the guys were assholes so, you know, there’s that. There was quite a bit of romance, but Jamie wasn’t put off by it the way she typically is of romance in novels. Sure, there was gratuitous descriptions of the male love interest, and yeah, Aerity was drooling over Paxton’s looks immediately, but she also just really wanted what was best for her kingdom, even if it wasn’t what was best for her heart. Jamie wasn’t a fan of any of the ships and found them all to be very heterosexual. When the lady tribes came in, she was like “YES PRINCESS LOVE,” but then they were just going to let the leader’s brother take the “prize”. (Which is another reason Jamie was ehhhh about this book. Aerity was a literal prize to be won.)

Leif was just a piece of work. He was such an asshole. He kissed girls without consent. He told Wyneth he would still want to sleep with her even after he married her cousin. Like, were we supposed to swoon over that? We couldn’t handle it or him and we both hope he dies in the next book, but don’t have enough care to actually read to find out.

Overall, we would say if you want to check this one out, get it from the library OR enter to win it below! Dani is giving away her copy so please take it off her hands if soap operas are your thing. Also, check out below for what Jamie wanted to happen at the end.

  • The Thousand Names

  • Auteur(s): Django Wexler
  • Narrateur(s): Richard Poe
  • Durée: 22 h et 13 min
  • Version intégrale
  • Au global
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Histoire
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

With this stunning series opener, Django Wexler leaps to the upper echelon of today’s best fantasy authors. The Thousand Names opens his Shadow Campaigns series with a tale of bloody rebellion that will reshape an empire -- and a world. Captain Marcus d’Ivoire and Winter Ihernglass see their fortunes rise under the command of military genius Janus bet Vhalnich. But Janus’ obsession with the supernatural portends a dire fate for the realm.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Series - Do not miss

  • Écrit par Daniel Ward le 2018-09-13

Good Start to a Fantasy Series!

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
3 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2018-07-27

I have mixed feelings about this one. On one hand, I was SUPER enthralled every time I was listening to it. I tried to listen only when I was doing chores and stuff and ended up just sitting on my bed and listening rather than doing anything. The storyline is really compelling and the characters are ones you really root for. However, I thought there could have been a bit more explanation at the end and I thought the first little bit was a bit thick with explanations. I also feel like there could have been a better handling of the races of the two warring factions because it reads really white but probably shouldn't based on the setting.

I enjoyed reading about the war and military tactics (which I wouldn't typically say because that's not really my thing) but I felt like the beginning had too much of an emphasis on it. I understand that it was to show us the life of a Captain (Marcus) versus the grunt (Winter) but it made for a bit of a dense read at the beginning when I should have been swept away. It took me a v long time to get past the first part (almost a month and a half) instead of the couple of hours it should have been. Once the focus shifted more to the characters and how they would have to survive the campaign (rather than the campaign itself), I found myself unable to turn the audiobook off. I was blowing off other reading responsibilities just to listen to this one. And it's the characters that really saved this one for me.

I loved Winter and her story. I felt super connected to her and am really glad we got her perspective on events. I also liked how her story intersected with Marcus and Janus. I think it was honestly the characters and their thoughts, feelings, and motivations that kept me so heavily invested in the story. And they are the reason I will be continuing on with the series (in book form, since I own the rest as hardcovers).

I thought the world-building was a little lacking. I felt like the magic system wasn't fully explained and thrown together at the end to give us some sense of "resolution" but it definitely wasn't enough. I feel like this one was bogged down with battle details rather than expanding upon the religious sects, the magic, and the history. I would have liked to know a bit more about all these things -- especially since they seem to have a large impact on the rest of the story. I think it was wise to keep the characters in the dark at the beginning, but that didn't mean we the readers had to be in the dark for the whole novel. I think we needed more from Janus's perspective (and not through Marcus and Winter) so that we could have a clear picture and focus but instead it just felt as though there was a need for a magic system so it got clumsily added to the end of the story.

I was anticipating something more from this one and even though I enjoyed actually listening to the book and the characters, I feel like there was too much battle details and not enough magic system/world-building for me to truly be satisfied. I am hoping there will be more in the next one, especially with an epilogue like that, so I am looking forward to reading The Shadow Throne!