AUDITEUR

Langer

  • 92
  • commentaires
  • 21
  • votes utiles
  • 106
  • évaluations

Marvelous novel. NOTE: Abridged; poor narration

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-19

Elsrwhere on Audible, there is a full version of this novel (3× the length) read expertly by John C. Reilly. That is not to say this isn't a very good reading of this story. This 'Reader's Digest' version of the book maintains all important moments and scenes. Perfect for an afternoon in the garden or a road trip.
Kesey is not a great reader. Not horrible, but you can tell he's not a professional. He reads characters like Mcmurphy (always Nicholson in my mind's eye) like they're characters in a Robert Service poem. To his credit, he avoids accents, but all the characters sound kind of the same.

The interview at the end with the author is interesting. I give this version of an outstanding story 3.5 out of 5 stars

Great 'Find the Killer'. Narrator falls short

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-19

This is a masterfully written mystery. The realistic investigation isn't cluttered with suspects and false leads, but has "loose ends" aplenty, with plausible twists and red herrings. Connelly's characters seem true-to-life with interesting motivations. The pacing is great. Forays away from the main plotline are infrequent and add, rather than detract, from the mystery. Small wonder this was made into a movie.

That's not to say the book has no flaws. The love interest plotline makes little sense on the whole. The 'quirky' sidekick seems contrived. The people that McCaleb deals with seem to come in 3 strains: outwardly hostile, sycophantically helpful, or reluctantly cooperative. Few characters fall outside of these categories, to the point that I would consciously guess which people fit where as they were introduced.

The narration by Dick Hill is enthusiastic and competent, but somehow doesn't work that well here. He reads the characters with emotion and good cadence, which is great. A goodly portion of the dialogue is over the telephone. Hill uses voice effects for these, also appreciated. But after a few hours - HOURS - of phone conversation (not his fault) it gets grating, like listening to a pop singer that uses autotune too much. Some of Hill's accents are straight-up bad, and others make little sense. Why do all these L.A. cops sound like they're from Brooklyn?

With a better reader this is easily a 5-star novel. As it is, I give it a solid 4 out of 5 stars.

Probably the Weakest in the Series

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-17

Don't get me wrong. This is an excellent book, very necessary as you go on in Harry Potter's world, setting up lots that happens. It's just a little weak on plot, starts to introduce much of the stuff I hate about YA (Harry becomes more and more surly, the misunderstood loner kid with a heart of gold), and doesn't flow as well as Rowling's other books.
But I still give it a solid 4 stars.

Great follow-up

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-17

One of the better books in the series. Rowling continues to develop her classic children's hero.
Jim Dale is a tremendous reader.

Quite entertaining suspenseful yarn

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-16

This book had me at times thinking of Ambrose Bierce and at others of V.C.Andrews. The book is well-written and very descriptive. It reads like a screenplay for a movie adaptation of a "scary" story, though one unfortunately not terribly scary. It has a couple of creepy moments but isn't quite the chiller I was hoping for when I bought this as a Daily Deal.

A few readers have commented on the off-putting sex in the book. I don't see it. While a little gratuitous and somewhat nonsensical in a couple of scenes, I didn't find it excessive.
The biggest concern I had for the book was it's length. It was slow to get started, plodding at times, and I was getting tired of it by the climax.

Robin Miles does an adequate job of narrating...nothing special. Her interpretation of African-Americans is at times caricature-ish. Like the only black people she had ever seen were on TV, but puts in an otherwise decent performance.

Overall, a very good book. While I am happy to have gotten it on sale, it's worth a credit. A solid 4 stars out of 5.

Enjoyable, if typical, Zombie fun

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-13

Face it, 'Hellifax' will never make the list for Canada Reads. You won't be studying 'Safari' in your Adv Lit classes. This is, on it's face, a pretty standard zombie apocalypse story - go to town for supplies, kill some zombies, fight some bad survivors, befriend some good ones - but "Mountain Man" has some features that make it far better than many books in the genre.

First is Blackmore's writing. The man writes amazingly vivid scenes. His descriptions of battles, in particular, are fantastic, easily visualized with great pacing, tension, and even humor. He clearly enjoys the subject matter and recognizes how actually absurd this premise is. It's not parody, but he joyfully doesn't take his story too seriously. I mean, come on. It's a Zombie story, not classic literature. Blackwood understands that.
Unfortunately, his style does have some flaws, particularly his apparent fascination with genital scratching and pooping.
Also, the number of oh-so-nearly fatal experiences seems a little excessive. I found myself hoping at times that Blackmore would show the courage to pull a G.R.R.Martin and kill off one of his guys. Not so much in these tales.
But maybe Blackmore is that brave? Some of his scenarios are simply NOT survivable, yet Blackmore's characters struggle on...or do they? Did that just happen? Or was it a Hallucination? Kind of a cool yet frustrating style that makes the reader think and reflect.
And why are there so many psychopaths in Blackmore's world? Are crazy people more likely to survive? Or does surviving drive you insane? Thought provoking.
The combination of an almost tongue-in-cheek approach, some philosophical questions, and plot ambiguity is intriguing, entertaining and refreshing.

The second pretty unique aspect of the stories: the setting is SUBURBAN NOVA SCOTIA! Zombie Apocalypse in small town Canada, hordes in the dead of a Canadian winter. Awesome.

Third, Blackmore's characters are fairly unique...not quite antiheroes but very flawed protagonists. Neither terribly clever nor brave, Gus is out of shape and alcoholic. Scott is more of a typical 'hero', but remains a tortured man and a bit of a wuss. While decent fellows, neither are really all that nice. They're relatable, something attempted but not often successful in zombie stories.

Lastly, R.C. Bray is a masterful narrator. First time I've listened to a performance and considered buying a book just because this guy is reading it (though I love Michael Kramer and Roy Dotrice).
One very small issue. Why can't any Non-Canadian say the word "toque"?

All in all, an exceptional novel. 4.5 Stars out of 5.

1 personnes sur 1 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

Quirky, Kitschy fun. YA for nostalgic GenXers

Au global
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-07

If you were born between 1960 and, say, '78, this book has tons of (hopefully fond) remembrances for you. Wil Wheaton is a great choice for a narrator, and does a fabulous job. Wesley Crusher reading Star Trek trivia. The story is fun, something like "American Treasure" set in a computer-generated fantasy universe.

Unfortunately it suffers from all the elements that I hate about Young Adult fiction. There's the stereotypical self-conscious misfit loner with few flaws. There's the obligatory (ugh) mysterious, attractive love interest. There's the pathognomonic precocity. How does a 17 year old get all of this amazing knowledge and insight? Have you ever met a high school student? There are some pretty big plot holes.

Set those problems aside and enjoy a pretty entertaining novel. 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Not quite Canada's answer to Orwell...

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-04

...but very, very close. This is an excellent novel. The characters (even the "antagonists") are mysterious and fascinating. Atwood's descriptive writing is unparalleled. The themes explored are worthy of discussion (no wonder this book is studied in high schools and universities) - I kept thinking of Hawthorne's 'Scarlet Letter', another great book exploring religion and misogyny.

There were a couple of small issues I had with the novel.
First, it's just too implausible. Part of the fun in speculative fiction is wodering how I (the reader) would behave in a similar situation. It's intriguing to imagine what I would do if there were a 'Big Brother'...but I think there actually COULD be an overbearing, oppressive government...happens all the time. I simply can't imagine more than half of the population being marginalized and used like this. Wouldn't happen. A little less effective because of that.
Secondly, Atwood at times blatantly ignores her choice of perspective. This is written in first person narrative (a great choice) but at times she describes how this person "would have looked" or what they "would've said"...then she shifts noticeably to third person to relate a conversation that Offred NEVER heard. Not a huge deal, but it subtracts a little from the author's credibility. While I understand why she does it (the scenes are very well described and add to the richness of her setting), the fact remains that Atwood CHEATED. I feel like I'm unfairly nitpicky pointing it out, but I'm not cool with that. I wonder why Atwood's editor didn't cut these scenes out. They are extraneous - they add very little to the plot - and they mar an otherwise near perfect novel.

I've read a couple of concerns from readers that I will comment on.
First, some have said the story is hard to follow and like a Seinfeld episode. Much Ado About Nothing. It's true that not until the second half of the novel does Atwood start even approaching a linear narrative. It IS confusing to start. Atwood jumps from events in Offred's past pre-downfall to her "training" with other handsmaids to her time with the Commander. It hops around and initially explains very little. Just jumping in like I (of course) know what has happened rather than TELLING me what has happened. I like it. Rather than leading the reader through the story from beginning through the events of the main plot, she "Tarantino's" it, trusting the reader to catch up and figure it out. A little unsatisfying unless you're patient. Oh so rewarding if you are.
Secondly, a few readers suggested listening at 2x speed. Claire Danes is an excellent reader. There are subtle differences in intonation for different characters. At high speed, they ALL sound like Smurfette, and you lose Danes' skill. Also, Atwood's writing is beautiful, descriptive, with a phenomenal attention to choosing just the right words. She has an economy of words, so her sentences are quite short. At 2x speed it's way too choppy. You just spent at least 14 bucks on a book and you want to, what, get through it as quickly as possible? A waste of a great story imo.

The small issues I have with the story are annoyances more than anything. They don't really detract from what is a great novel. 4.5 out of 5 stars

Surprised that I loved it

Au global
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
5 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-02

I was hesitant to spend a credit on this. The hype is for real. This is a very, very good novel. I don't much like 'Young Adult" fiction. A little too polished, a little too cookie-cutter, often just pushing out stuff that will sell.
While guilty of a little of this, 'Ender's Game' works. The broody, overly self-conscious kid fits the story. The precocity is actually part of the plot, so the way-too-mature protagonist makes sense, where it seems somewhat inexplicable in most YA. While a little weak on the Science underlying the make-believe, the events are still plausible (descriptions of moving in zero G are excellent).
The one (minor) weakness in this audiobook is the performance. It would do better with a single reader, rather than an ensemble. 4.5 out of 5 Stars.

While this is a great book, I won't go on with Scott Card's "Enderverse". If you are looking for a space epic - grittier, more mature, and with a bit more hard science to back it and make it plausible - I suggest James S.A. Corey

Not sure how to rate this...

Au global
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Histoire
4 out of 5 stars

Évalué le: 2019-09-02

This book was bought for me by a Psychiatrist friend when I had some health issues. It's a pretty innovative take on CBT. Audiobook is not the best format for this kind of book. I would suggest if you are really interested in pursuing the techniques McGonigle suggests, a hard copy of this book, and maybe the app, would serve you better.
I have no real experience with psychological self help books such as this. Thus, I am unsure how to rank it among such books. Well-written and well-researched I guess. I am a physician, and the techniques seem reasonable and are likely to be effective for the right person