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Description

From one of America's greatest minds, a journey through psychology, philosophy, and lots of meditation to show how Buddhism holds the key to moral clarity and enduring happiness.

Robert Wright famously explained in The Moral Animal how evolution shaped the human brain. The mind is designed to often delude us, he argued, about ourselves and about the world. And it is designed to make happiness hard to sustain.

But if we know our minds are rigged for anxiety, depression, anger, and greed, what do we do? Wright locates the answer in Buddhism, which figured out thousands of years ago what scientists are discovering only now. Buddhism holds that human suffering is a result of not seeing the world clearly - and proposes that seeing the world more clearly, through meditation, will make us better, happier people.

In Why Buddhism Is True, Wright leads listeners on a journey through psychology, philosophy, and a great many silent retreats to show how and why meditation can serve as the foundation for a spiritual life in a secular age. At once excitingly ambitious and wittily accessible, this is the first book to combine evolutionary psychology with cutting-edge neuroscience to defend the radical claims at the heart of Buddhist philosophy. With bracing honesty and fierce wisdom, it will persuade you not just that Buddhism is true - which is to say, a way out of our delusion - but that it can ultimately save us from ourselves, as individuals and as a species.

©2017 Robert Wright. All rights reserved. (P)2017 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ce que les critiques disent

"I have been waiting all my life for a readable, lucid explanation of Buddhism by a tough-minded, skeptical intellect. Here it is. This is a scientific and spiritual voyage unlike any I have taken before." (Martin Seligman, professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and best-selling author of Authentic Happiness)
"This is exactly the book that so many of us are looking for. Writing with his characteristic wit, brilliance, and tenderhearted skepticism, Robert Wright tells us everything we need to know about the science, practice, and power of Buddhism." (Susan Cain, best-selling author of Quiet)
"Robert Wright brings his sharp wit and love of analysis to good purpose, making a compelling case for the nuts and bolts of how meditation actually works. This book will be useful for all of us, from experienced meditators to hardened skeptics who are wondering what all the fuss is about." (Sharon Salzberg, cofounder of the Insight Meditation Society and best-selling author of Real Happiness)

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Moyenne des évaluations de clients

Au global

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    43
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Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Histoire

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    34
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Trier :
  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • joe okros
  • 2018-06-08

Great work.

Great book..hard to follow at times...but definitely worth the study...down to earth understanding of a fairly complex subject.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • John Mertz
  • 2018-01-03

Intriguing and Relatable

For someone who has long been interested in Western Buddhism but who has never has a easy introduction to integrating it into my life, this book was exactly what I needed.

It makes no claims about the purely hypothetical metaphysics of traditional Buddhism, but digs deeply into the practical application of meditation practice that have been recognized by academics, medical professionals, and regular introspective folks, alike. It uses modern psychological and clinical evidence to show how many of the core tenants of ancient Buddhism represented a better understanding of the mind than had been available in the West until recently.

The author frames the book around his own experience, handicapped by his own lack of aptitude for it. The shortcoming of the book is that his own somewhat-limited success was a result of a lengthy meditation retreat which might not be realistic for all readers to replicate. It is never implied that the book is a substitute for this practice and it should not be expected as a textbook on medication practice.

It is well read by a narrator who is very believable as first-person of the narrative. The summary chapter at the end is very valuable and is something I will referencing frequently in the future.

I was turned on to the book by it's discussion with the author on the "Partially Examined Life" podcast and would recommend this if you are not quite sold.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Colm Lynn
  • 2017-12-31

Great read on psychology, meditation and Buddhism.

One of the single most profound and concise books available on the subject of mindfulness and meditation from an evolution perspective.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Manish Bhatt
  • 2017-11-23

Finally all dots connected.

This is the best book for me. I spent lot of time understanding how natural selection works and in that process I had many many questions and I always struggled to connect natural selection with the "reality". Naturally that quest led me to deeper questions about reality and to meditation and Buddhism. This book connects all those dots. Makes so much sense. Finished once but will be listening to this many many times. Thanks ! Robert for creating this masterpiece.

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Kanoe Nut
  • 2017-12-01

Too much

I really wanted to like this book but the overwhelming details the author used were too much. I found myself getting lost at times. The writers style really doesn’t lend itself to narration. I think this book would have been better in print. Still, the content was incredible and I did learn quite a bit. Just wish it could have been done in a more upbeat fashion.

0 personnes sur 1 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

Trier :
  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Rugger Burke
  • 2017-09-12

More than a beginner's guide...

Would you consider the audio edition of Why Buddhism Is True to be better than the print version?

Having purchased and read/listened to both, consider them equal. One caveat: is not a beginner's guide to Buddhism. Therefore, would suggest others choose the medium best suited for taking in information. In either instance, however, the text flows easily as if having a conversation with a knowledgeable friend about a topic of mutual interest.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Why Buddhism Is True?

Wright's explanation of subjects typically glossed over by most books on Buddhism such as emptiness and non-self stood out for their clarity. Most books on Buddhism cover the basics of the branches of Buddhism, an explanation of the four noble truths, and the virtues of the eight-fold path. Instead of a general overview, Wright writes about some of the more seemingly esoteric areas of secular Buddhism. He does this well integrating both personal experience as well as helpful examples. He then pulls the threads together to demonstrate the importance of understanding these topics and why they are relevant to how we relate to our selves and the world around us.

Have you listened to any of Fred Sanders’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Yes. Sanders strikes a good tone in conveying the material, though sometimes the emphasis of a line or two may have been different than the author's internal voice while writing.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

If you will give two hours of time for your entertainment, why not meditate an hour a day to claim your life?

Any additional comments?

Wright commented in the book that one his teachers commented that writing the book may impede his progress toward enlightenment. Hopefully, this is not so. Instead, the book served as a reason for him to explore further and record his discoveries along the way, Regardless, he left firm footing for others following a similar path.

Thus, it's easy to recommend this book for someone with a basic to intermediate understanding of Buddhism looking for further reading on topics beyond the basic tenants of Buddhism or a meditation guide who prefers a contemporary, secular point of view. While this sounds like a relatively small group, perhaps so. But maybe this book will continue to expand its number.

18 personnes sur 18 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • George
  • 2017-08-10

Clear Explanation of How the Mind Works

Most books on Buddhism teach you how to drive; this book is like having Click and Clack lift the hood of the car and explain very clearly why the engine works. I think it may be one of the most helpful books I've ever read. The clarity with which emotions are explained is amazing. The author convinced me of the effectiveness of mindfulness. He is always careful to say where the science is uncertain or where the Buddhism is not grounded in science. I think I can now read other Buddhism texts, like the Suttas, with a framework for understanding that I did not have before. The author has a conversational, self-depreciating, and personal style of writing that I like. Narration is good.

67 personnes sur 73 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Roger
  • 2017-09-18

Weak on Science; Okay on Philosophy

I really wanted to like this book but it was not a book I would recommend to people who are looking for a book on Buddhism and Science. I agree with many of the authors' conclusions but is was not compelling and little of what was said was new or interesting. If you are considering a book on the subject of Science and Buddhism, then please consider "The Science of Enlightenment" by Shinzen Young. Shinzen is far more accomplished as a meditator and he is truly gifted in terms of articulation. I also found "Buddha's Brain" by Rick Hanson to be far more interesting in terms of Neuroscience and the benefits of Insight Meditation. The reader was really bland and did not do the book any favors.

31 personnes sur 35 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Acarya
  • 2017-08-19

Worth some of your time...

Worth some of your time...
The author makes a number of important observations. However, there is also quite a bit of filler to work through.
For example, there are numerous personal anecdotes many of which are rather banal.
So, I think your time would be better spent with essential Buddhist texts. Plus, it seems to me that the more analytical parts of the book are at least partly based on speculation; precisely what the Buddha advised us not to spend time on.
As you can see, the author's argument and presentation left me with mixed feelings.

16 personnes sur 18 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Dave Ferguson
  • 2017-10-03

Presentation Matters

I'm sure professor Wright is interesting in class or he wouldn't be teaching. The approach is thorough, the theories well researched, but the reader is devoid of emotion. I prefer to have the author read his own work for non-fiction titles because it's not just the words that matter. This is meaningful content and a valuable tool when you are able to use it in life.

3 personnes sur 3 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • feeble
  • 2017-09-09

So hard to listen to.

Fred Sanders makes it hard to listen to this book. He sounds like a computer program. You could get the same mundane tone from a text-to-speech app. Because of this, I found it hard to concentrate on the books material. Truthfully, this should be reread by another narrator and republished. I am not joking.

10 personnes sur 12 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • B. Margerum
  • 2017-09-22

Best book on Buddhism and Mediation ever written

Would you listen to Why Buddhism Is True again? Why?

I have already listened to it 3 times. Even though the explanations are clear and logical, the book is filled with rich information and paradoxes that you can't just listen to it once and get the full meaning. Just an outstanding book! Kudos to Robert Wright!

What was one of the most memorable moments of Why Buddhism Is True?

Understanding essence and how you need to look at it from a more universal view, i.e. as Einstein did for his Theory of Relativity

2 personnes sur 2 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Fyodor
  • 2017-08-15

Very clear and helpful

A great argument. Very clear and well structured. The best kind of introduction to Buddhism in a modern context. This helped me a lot to sort out some of the Buddhist concepts which seemed confusing or vague as they're commonly presented. (Something I was expecting for Sam Harris' book on spirituality)

11 personnes sur 14 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Tom
  • 2017-10-07

Speaks to psychology, not spirtual or relgious

A must read for all adults. Nothing in this book will conflict with your religious beliefs or change how you feel about your faith.

6 personnes sur 8 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Tom
  • 2017-09-11

I do not recommend this book

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

Nothing really. This author's perspective and story telling style simply does not resonate with my own life experience and preferences. Other readers/listeners may appreciate this book.

What could Robert Wright have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

The author could have interviewed other people and presented a broader range of perspectives on Buddhism than just his own.

What does Fred Sanders bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He was a neutral reader, and he did not add or subtract from the content.

What character would you cut from Why Buddhism Is True?

N/A.

Any additional comments?

It seems the author is an intellectual, possibly somewhat neurotic (no offense, some people are just that way), city-dwelling American whose internally focused mind is preventing him from understanding the subject of this book. He struggles with the most basic questions and never seems to satisfactorily answer them for himself, and certainly not for the reader. Ask anyone who has been through hard core physical/mental training for sports or military purposes, and they will provide a much better explanation of what it means for the self not to exist. As other reviewers have noted, his personal anecdotes are beyond mundane. In some ways it is cool that a feeling of detachment from a tingling sensation in his toe rocked his world, but it's not great fodder for storytelling. That said, I am sure there are many readers who will relate to the author's perspective on Buddhism, so if you are more on the cerebral end of the spectrum, definitely give it a try. Hearing this while driving through Montana dodging cows and whitetail deer on my way to the field for work was rough going for me, though. One final point; as I understand it, compassion is a central theme of Buddhism and he barely mentions it.

16 personnes sur 23 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente