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Description

The number one best-selling author of the Bobiverse trilogy returns with a space thriller that poses a provocative question: Does our true destiny lie in ourselves - or in the stars?

If it were up to one man and one man alone to protect the entire human race - would you want it to be a down-on-his luck asteroid miner? 

When Ivan Pritchard signs on as a newbie aboard the Mad Astra, it's his final, desperate stab at giving his wife and children the life they deserve. He can survive the hazing of his crewmates, and how many times, really, can near-zero g make you vomit? But there's another challenge looming out there, in the farthest reaches of human exploration, that will test every man, woman and AI on the ship - and will force Ivan to confront the very essence of what makes him human.

©2018 Dennis E. Taylor (P)2018 Audible Originals, LLC. Cover illustration by Stephan Martiniere.

Ce que les critiques disent

“Dennis Taylor serves up a top-notch outer-space adventure…. Ray Porter’s narration is simply brilliant…. In addition to suspense, action, futuristic detail, and moments of comedy, the book brings a light, investigative touch to the question of what exactly human identity is.” (The Washington Post

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Moyenne des évaluations de clients

Au global

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    38
  • 4 étoiles
    17
  • 3 étoiles
    4
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    48
  • 4 étoiles
    8
  • 3 étoiles
    1
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Histoire

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    35
  • 4 étoiles
    17
  • 3 étoiles
    5
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0
Trier :
  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Tiffany Carlyle
  • 2018-06-12

More Please! great work Taylor and Porter!

Maybe a sequel in the future? how do you see humanity after having big brother Ralph watching over us? do we get better? I forsee a church of Ralph.

1 personnes sur 1 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Schills
  • 2018-06-20

Ray Porter is quickly becoming a favourite.

I am looking forward to more from Dennis E. Taylor. Another greatly enjoyable sci-fi story.

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Chris Graham
  • 2018-06-20

Enjoyable listen.

I found this to be an entertaining listen. The story wasn't quite as good as the bobiverse books. but still entertaining and the performance by Ray Porter was spot-on again.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mike Munro
  • 2018-06-16

Better then BOB

After listening to the I Am Legion series I had to give this a listen. It is better then the forementioned series in every way can’t wait to see if there is a sequel.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Robert
  • 2018-06-15

Simply excellent

I am not sure how any one writer can be so gifted, but Dennis E.Taylor is a remarkable talent who is able to tell a great compelling story with characters that are dynamic living beings. Serious science mixed with some serious humour combined with dramatic tension, this book will not disappoint.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Dustin Gary thompson
  • 2018-06-14

Couldn't stop listening

I couldn't stop listening to this book, story and narration we're amazing. My favorite Book by far.

Trier :
  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • A Texan 2
  • 2018-06-19

Too many problems. Too many poor choices

I really wanted to like this book. After all, it had everything going for it. Written by Dennis E. Taylor, who has recently finished what has become one of my all-time favorites series with his “Bobiverse” trilogy. As I almost always consume my books by audio anymore, Ray Porter returning to narrate was also another element strongly in favor of this new book.
Let’s get some positives out of the way, for there are several. As stated, Ray Porter once again brings an A game to the narration with distinct voices for the major characters…though, having finished the Bobiverse not too long ago and also having listened to him narrate the works of Peter Cline, it is getting a little harder to not notice some similarities in voices across the different books. Still, there’s only so many voices one person can produce. At this point, I liken it more to recognizing actors who tend to pop up in different roles on the various syfy shows being filmed up in Canada. As I say, for these books, the character voices are distinct and easy to tell who is who at any given time.
The characters themselves are well written and engaging. I can tend to forgive a lot of story writing sins if the characters are at least interesting enough to make me care about what they are going through. Once again, Mr. Taylor delivers on that front.
Finally, the concept itself showed a lot of promise. A first contact situation for humanity is a common science fiction premise, so it’s getting harder to come up with something original. Weaving in the Fermi Paradox and Game Theory as integral elements of the story gave this a different spin. So, while I give credit to Mr. Taylor for this take on first contact, it’s the execution that ultimately soured me.
Especially getting through the meat of the story in the middle, one name kept popping up in my head – Prometheus. The movie set in the universe of the Alien movies. If you’ve seen it, one of it’s biggest problems is how much of the plot is driven by supposedly highly educated scientists making a string of amazing dumb decisions. At every turn in the middle of the book, I kept finding myself questioning out loud things like “Why would they do that?” “Who’s been watching this guy?” “Why is nobody talking to this guy every day?” So much of the conflict arises from an unbelievable lack of communication by a group of people who are all together in the same facility. I can appreciate some level of mistrust on the part of the central protagonist as he moves through this middle part of the story. But with that, he shouldn’t have been able to get away with doing much of what he did without being noticed. What compounds all this, and in many ways makes it worse that what happened in Prometheus, it just how dumb the alien intelligence is as well.
I’ve danced around any major spoilers up until now. I’m going to get into a few more detailed examples to illustrate some of my issues. I’ll try to keep spoilers limited, but I am going to reveal some more details. The book starts off with an alien probe arriving in our system, identifying Earth as a place with a good potential for sentient life to emerge, and leaves behind a small part of it’s payload to….sit inert until someone is dumb enough to make a grab for it. After Ivan is “infected” and has gone through his transformation, he begins communicating with the machine that has essentially replaced his body. Ivan is asked why the aliens just left a small package to be discovered. He replies with something along the lines of it allowed the aliens to make due with a minimum amount of material. The implication is that the main probe wandering the galaxy has a limited payload, so it leaves a small, inert batch in each system it identifies that waits for the local species to become advanced enough at space travel to come out and find it. The problem is that this whole premise quickly falls apart. Mr. Taylor shows that the alien artifact has considerable manufacturing capability in the form of nanites. It uses them to very quickly conduct major planet changing transformations – building mega structures on Mercury, Venus, and Mars in a matter of a few hours or days. The technology makes the 3D printing capabilities of the Bobiverse look like a quilting bee by comparison. It’s hard to reconcile a collection of alien intelligence that advanced leaving a package to sit dormant, doing absolutely nothing until it gets discovered. You would think it would have built itself up enough in the ensuing millions of years to establish contact and make regular transmissions back to the “space address” for lack of a better term, that is had hard coded within itself. Reporting back on the progress of human development on Earth and getting updates on the state of the galactic war over the ongoing millions of years – even at 142 years a round trip, would have made far more sense than leaving the whole thing to chance.
The book suffers from a number of other structural issues particularly with regard to how time flows through the narrative and how quickly things are able to move and, as mentioned above, be built, relative to other moving parts of the narrative.
Finally, I just found the world building itself implausible and lacking in internal consistency. As most science fiction readers know, we have to engage in a certain level of suspension of disbelief to accept the world that we’re asked to visit through piece of media like this. Warp drives, laser swords, space folding – various concepts that we buy into. But, we expect some level of internal consistency; some set of rules that are either explicitly spelled out by the author, or implicitly communicated by the events of the narrative. Certainly some properties handle this better than others. A system with strong space faring capability, multi-planet settlements, and the ability to exploit the resources of the system via mining is hard to reconcile with an Earth that is still suffering from rising oceans and global warming. This same system suffers from what seems to be near poverty and desperation for most of the population, yet the system has an abundance of exploitable resources and the “big rock” strike turns a crew of mining prospectors into billionaires with monetary resources to impact the behavior of governments. If this book had been written 40 years ago, I could forgive some of this. But, a lot of science fiction has been written, read, and critiqued in that time. Even though the author makes explicit references to some of our commonly know science fiction, in many ways, it tries to operate as though none of that literature and the thoughts behind it are part of our common understanding.
The book feels like the author really wanted to offer lessons in Game Theory and the Fermi Paradox and wrote a story backwards to build toward them. However, at least for me, the whole premise that he starts from just doesn’t make enough sense to be able to believably follow this ride. I think if this were posted on Bobnet, the Bobs would take Mr. Taylor to task for this piece of writing. He’s demonstrated that he is capable of far far better than this.

16 personnes sur 17 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jerry
  • 2018-06-06

Excellent!

The Bobiverse trilogy quickly became a favorite for me. I was excited to see another book from Dennis Taylor come up as recommended. I burned through this in a day. Excellent book. The audio effects were top notch! When characters talked over the radio or phone there was a light change to the dialogue. It worked well and I hope other audiobooks take note of how well it works.

51 personnes sur 59 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Tavis
  • 2018-06-06

12 hour book within 24 hours

I couldn't sleep last night. It wasn't insomnia. It was THIS DARN BOOK! I couldn't turn it off. I swear I set my sleep timer for 15 minutes at least 10 times. I've had my Bluetooth headphone in my ear since I woke up this morning. I don't know how Mr. Taylor does it, but thank you for being a fast writer! The Bob series and then this book. I might be in love. I think I will be going to look up his previous books now. Lord help my sleep patterns.

50 personnes sur 58 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mike Pluta
  • 2018-06-05

Five Stars Squared!

The team of Dennis E. Taylor and Ray Porter have again delivered audiobook good!

The Singularity Trap , penned by Taylor and voiced by Porter is a new hard sci-fi Audible exclusive release. The story incorperates first contact, nanotechnology, military conspiracies, interstellar conflict and more all wrapped in the warm quilt of Taylor-Porter fun and frivolity.

I've been patiently waiting for this release and have not been disappointed.

I wish I could give this five stars squared!

66 personnes sur 78 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Thomas M.
  • 2018-06-12

Taylor and Porter team up for another hit

I hadn't heard if either Dennis E. Taylor it Ray Porter before I listened to the Bobiverse series, but I'm happy someone brought it to my attention. I finished The Singularity Trap even faster than I did any book from the other series, and that's really saying something.

Taylor gives realistic depth to all characters, and spins an intellectual but fun tale. Porter is simply an amazing voice actor, sometimes making it sound like you're listening to an actual conversation between 2 people. I will read anything this team puts out in the future!

4 personnes sur 4 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • LINCOLN
  • 2018-06-06

Want more like the Bobiverse....YES!

You know when you finish a good series and long for more....well, this will satisfy Bobiverse fans and create many new one of its own. The story is well written with suspense, excellent character development and enough hard science to make it great entertaining Sci Fi. I love Ray Porter and Taylor and Porter are a dream team match. Enjoy!

23 personnes sur 28 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Daniel Schumacher
  • 2018-06-06

Fans of the Bob series will not be disappointed!

Dennis E Taylor does it again. A very different story from his previous trilogy but with the same level of detail and loving character development. I can't wait for more!

11 personnes sur 13 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ethan kilburn
  • 2018-06-06

diddn't think Bob would ever have competition!

I was hesitant. but this thing had me hooked. cannot wait for more. God I hope there is more.

18 personnes sur 22 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • T Heskett
  • 2018-06-07

Love this Narrator!

The story is great, and this narrator is the best thing an audible book author could ask for! If you loved the "Bob" books form Dennis E. Taylor, you will find this book a gem.

6 personnes sur 7 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Abdur Abdul-Malik
  • 2018-06-08

Not As Compelling as the Bobiverse

First off, I loved the Bobiverse and I think Dennis E. Taylor is a great addition to the world of sci-fi. That acknowledged, and it pains me to say this, The Singularity Trap is a miss. The narration is top-notch, but the story isn't arresting. I didn't make much of a connection with the protagonist. I also felt the dialogue wasn't riveting either. Too many times the author tells us the characters laughed at something I personally didn't laugh at. Also, referencing Star Trek was okay in the Bobiverse, but I cringed when it came up again in this book (even in passing). However, my central issue is the plot itself. I have read many books about the singularity and I don't feel the author portrayed the subject convincingly. The singularity is a huge idea, one that basically says no human being alive at this moment can fully comprehend what a post-human world would be like. It would be a universe of staggering complexity and wonders. Such grandeur wasn't really conveyed or even really hinted at. We have some gee-whiz moments, but not enough of them. This is a criticism that can be aimed at many authors. Read The Age of Spiritual Machines, Life 3.0, and Superintelligence, all non-fiction books. I wish more authors would borrow ideas from those tomes.

9 personnes sur 11 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente