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  • The Ideal Team Player

  • How to Recognize and Cultivate the Three Essential Virtues: A Leadership Fable
  • Auteur(s): Patrick M. Lencioni
  • Narrateur(s): Stephen Hoye
  • Durée: 5 h et 3 min
  • 4,5 out of 5 stars (224 évaluations)

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Description

In his classic book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni laid out a groundbreaking approach for tackling the perilous group behaviors that destroy teamwork. Here he turns his focus to the individual, revealing the three indispensable virtues of an ideal team player.

In The Ideal Team Player, Lencioni tells the story of Jeff Shanley, a leader desperate to save his uncle's company by restoring its cultural commitment to teamwork. Jeff must crack the code on the virtues that real team players possess and then build a culture of hiring and development around those virtues. Beyond the fable, Lencioni presents a practical framework and actionable tools for identifying, hiring, and developing ideal team players.

Whether you're a leader trying to create a culture around teamwork, a staffing professional looking to hire real team players, or a team player wanting to improve yourself, this book will prove to be as useful as it is compelling.

©2016 Patrick Lencioni (P)2016 Audible, Inc.

Ce que les auditeurs disent de The Ideal Team Player

Moyenne des évaluations de clients
Au global
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    145
  • 4 étoiles
    55
  • 3 étoiles
    16
  • 2 étoiles
    5
  • 1 étoile
    3
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    120
  • 4 étoiles
    49
  • 3 étoiles
    18
  • 2 étoiles
    3
  • 1 étoile
    4
Histoire
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    122
  • 4 étoiles
    46
  • 3 étoiles
    19
  • 2 étoiles
    3
  • 1 étoile
    3

Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Good start, but missing some important things

A few criticisms:
1. I don't think Lencioni defends the claim that we need to have "ideal team players" well enough. It's very brief when it happens. It seems we're supposed to already believe we should value teamwork over each individual's competency in their field. But how do you actually convince others that we need to value teamwork over hiring for talent?

2. The qualities of the idea team player are humble, hungry and smart (about people). This leaves out at least one thing: empathy, or concern for other's feelings. In the book, they discuss how someone who's smart does not necessarily care for the good of others. They could use their people smarts to manipulate others for instance. But they also say that someone who's humble will hurt other's feelings by being indelicate or rude because they just don't have the people smarts to know how to communicate. (Nancy in the fable.) How can both these things be true, but when you have all three qualities together, you then have someone who all of a sudden cares for you personally? I am surprised that this has evaded the author!

3. It completely ignores the role of context and culture and focuses solely on individual traits. I get that the book is about the idea team player, and this enables each of us to use it on ourselves. However, I'm surprised there is no discussion of how important it is for executives and managers to consider more than just each person's traits. It seems to suggest that a leader has no role to play in developing a team other than selecting good team players. A leader must also create an environment that rewards and encourages team effort. In fact, it may even be the case that these aren't traits one either has or doesn't, but skills one can develop, and thus something that leaders should focus on developing. The book Turn that Ship Around comes to mind because the author, Cpt David Marquet, was able to take the USS Santa Fe from worst in the Navy to best without letting a single sailor go. Not one person fired and they go from last to first (out of something like 40 ships). Obviously I'm very skeptical that each of these hundreds of guys was already an ideal team player. No! It was something about the culture that Marquet encouraged through his leadership that created a successful teamwork environment.

Taken with that in mind, I still find HHS to be a useful set of qualities to consider when hiring team members and creating your team. For that reason, despite 3 stars, I think this book is worth a read.

7 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Exciting Life and HR concept

The fable and following discussion gave a clear idea of the many aspects of the concept. Certainly more than just an HR concept but even a life concept. An excellent read.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

love this concept

this would be a perfect for for any culture based business! It would also create an understanding of what is expected of everyone and increase accountability in the workplace.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Love Lencioni!

I absolutely love Patrick Lencioni fables with the in depth analysis at the end. It really gets you thinking! This was no different!

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Very valuable for hiring practices

Great book for guiding your hiring & measuring soft skills. This one will be in my 'read again' pile.

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

It was okay

The real meat of the book is on Part V but you need to listen to the first 4 parts in order to understand it. It would be easier if the story was acted out instead of narrated

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

great read but..

the narrator stressed the last bit of some words and every sentence. It sounded super pretentious and interrupted the flow of the story.

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars

Utter shite.

It's shite aimed at used car salesmen and mlm housewivesves. Genuinely upset I can't get my money back.
I suppose they got me too. Utter shit.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Great Audiobook

Great listening. I will definitely recommend it, and will play again.and again. thank you very much for this great audiobook

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars

the story dragged

let me some this book up into 3 words. Be humble, hungry & smart.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mauricio Giommi Ochoa
  • 2020-09-15

great

Great tool for professional and personal development, highly recommended for anyone who wants to get better at life.

Trier :
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  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Andrea
  • 2016-09-05

Lot of talk about a simple concept

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Sure, but the guy reading the book was terrible, almost put me to sleep several times. I would buy the book not the audible version. Go to the end and simply read the overview. If you have read a lot of Patricks stuff then this is repeated material on some levels. I do love Pats stuff so don't think I'm down on him, not at all, just that it is repeating material.

Has The Ideal Team Player turned you off from other books in this genre?

No

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Stephen Hoye?

Whoever it was that narrated "The hard thing about hard things" by Ben Horowitz, THAT was a great book and well narrated. Also, Steve Jobs narrator.

Did The Ideal Team Player inspire you to do anything?

Perhaps, but not much.

18 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Shawn N Price
  • 2016-09-20

Required Reading/Listening

Would you listen to The Ideal Team Player again? Why?

As the Chief of Staff for my organization I am designing and implementing the Team Development programs. These programs are based on The 5 Dysfunctions of Teams, The Ideal Team Player, and Sean Covey's The Four Disciplines of Execution. While "5 Dysfunctions" focuses on team level development, "The Ideal Team Player" focuses on individual development. I find that I "rewind and re-listen" often with Lencioni, and that I stop and take notes (OneNotes) and record thoughts.

What did you like best about this story?

The drama was fantastic. The characters and personalities engaging.

What about Stephen Hoye’s performance did you like?

Hoye's performance was great. I liked his energy and pace.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes!

Any additional comments?

While I began this book thinking about how to teach and share the principles of ideal team players with others, I came away with the determination to change my nature and to become a much better team player. Having and using this book is changing my life and making me a much better team player, and I am making my life a whole lot more fun and exciting.

16 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • A. Yoshida
  • 2016-08-10

Humble, Hungry, and Smart

Like his other books, the business advice is provided through the telling of a story. The benefit of doing it this way is that it provides a context as if you're in the story and can relate to what the characters are going through. You gain an understanding of the advice and how it might apply in real life. However, the author should not have written the story as if it's a fiction book written for entertainment, where the plot is drawn out to create suspense and details are added to develop the characters. Finally after multiple meetings and discussions, the characters (executives of the construction company) conclude the three key qualities of an ideal team player are: humble (not arrogant or dismissive of people), hungry (wanting to do more and learn more), and smart (emotional intelligence). Then the story dragged on again as they met with employees to figure out if the employees possessed those qualities. The last few chapters were useful in explaining key behaviors expected from ideal team players, such as willing to display vulnerability and build trust, hold people accountable, and commit to group decisions.

8 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • R. Sttz
  • 2016-09-08

Great format, narration

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would definitely recommend this. I found the story form "fable" in the first 70% of the book to be a solid way to put the concepts into practice, so that the nuts & bolts description of the model was crystal clear.

What about Stephen Hoye’s performance did you like?

I listen to virtually all audio books at 1.5X speed, and I found that to be a good pace for this narration. The narration was very clear, contained appropriate inflections, and was engaging. For those who listen to audio books at 1X and find themselves getting distracted/bored, speed up the narration to a speed that will keep you engaged.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

It would be a lot of information for one sitting, but the "fable" portion could certainly be engaging for one sitting. The model/application would be something you'd want to listen to more than once. Since the book was split up in this fashion, one can listen to the nuts & bolts application portion and get a lot of benefit w/o having to listen to the entire book over again.

6 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Adam13
  • 2020-08-10

Good book, horrible voiceover

My only complaint here is the person doing the audio book itself sounds like he learned to speak from William Shatner. I feel like I’m listening to a Star Trek reading, his over enunciation is absolutely horrible and making this book a challenge to get through.

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lori
  • 2016-12-26

loved it

my husbands company required him to read this book. what a great way to show your company Style. it's nice because he's listening to it on his drive to work great motivator

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Caroline
  • 2016-05-05

Maybe the best book in team players yet.

I really enjoyed listening to this book. It has provided me some tools that are going to help me a great deal in hiring and coaching staff

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 2022-02-03

In a perfect world….

Heavily relies on modern day capitalistic slavery. This is an excellent how to get your employees to make you lots of money. This would work in a perfect world, where the leader’s themselves follow through on what they say, but I have worked in the construction industry for many years, and that is almost never the case.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Jack PM
  • 2020-11-16

Tedious and not for non-managers

I had to read this as a work requirement. Not being in a managerial position, it was far from any information that I need and the whole book can be summed up as follows.

You want employees who are hungry (ambitious), humble (know and admit when they're wrong, or when someone can do better), and smart (aware of people's feelings, and abilities). I just saved you five hours, and not having to hear the word "jackass" literally fifty times.

At the end of the book while talking about who is humble, Lencioni goes into the most humble person that still walks among us -- Jesus Christ. I can accept someone wanting to promote their faith, but it does rather come out of nowhere. Perhaps he also wants us to hire just Christians. Don't know.

The narrator is absolutely wrong for this book. Perhaps good for an episode of Nova, but is utterly dry for any kind of story.

Overall, this book is far too time consuming for something that could have been written in ten pages. I suppose there are managers who eat up this stuff, but if you're not a person who hires then there are more enlightening books about the human condition.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Magpie
  • 2020-09-24

Subjective much?

A pleasant tale about a team becoming more cohesive. K. So, what objective tools can a business use to achieve that goal? I dunno, cause you certainly won’t find that information in this book. There is no evidence based fact on what to look for in successful employees. Just vague mentioning of “strong culture” and “no jackasses”. There is never once a clear definition of what “success” actually looks like. Save your time, look up actual research, and find objective useable data that is relevant to your company.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile