LISTENER

Daniel T.

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 7
  • ratings
  • Born a Crime

  • Stories from a South African Childhood
  • Written by: Trevor Noah
  • Narrated by: Trevor Noah
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4,254
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,907
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3,898

One of the comedy world's fastest-rising stars tells his wild coming of age story during the twilight of apartheid in South Africa and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed. Noah provides something deeper than traditional memoirists: powerfully funny observations about how farcical political and social systems play out in our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Superb

  • By Amazon Customer on 2017-11-10

must listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-03-09

what an incredible story. excellent performance, well written, totally engrossing and interesting. edifying. highly recommended

  • Sapiens

  • A Brief History of Humankind
  • Written by: Yuval Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3,157
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,739
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,729

In Sapiens, Dr. Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical - and sometimes devastating - breakthroughs of the cognitive, agricultural, and scientific revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology, and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I've learned so much from this book!

  • By Amazon Customer on 2017-09-17

Powerful insightful book with a few foibles

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-10-03

Overall this is a very engaging and thought provoking book. Harari does a superb job weaving together historical, anthtopological and sociological research into one cohesive and well written narrative. The prose is fun and enhances the delivery of his often profound insights. The downside of the book is that his tendency to oversimplify and generalize (which may be necessary in this type of work) casts a shadow on the rest of the book and leads to doubting other seemingly sound conclusions. In some cases, Harari overgeneralises to the point that his statements are at least seemingly if not blatantly historically inaccurate. Still, it may be that such an ambitious project requires a certain degree of creative license. Who could possibly gain a sufficient mastery over all of human history to totally avoid inaccuracies in a work of these proportions, or even if that were possible, would it be readable given the level of detail required? Great book though.