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Kevin Canlas

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Helps you understand when you're in a rut.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-04-09

Things you'll learn:

* How to identify when you're working a dead-end job.
* How to identify when you're in "The Dip". The dip is basically a metaphorical "filter" or "sticking point" in terms of your career. Some people get through it, some don't. The people who get through it become great. The people who don't, quit just before the tipping point, essentially wasting their time

Essential reading for men

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-08-24

This is it.

One of the greatest books for men when it comes to dating and relationships.
Especially in this day and age where feminism is the norm.
It's not about pick-up lines or magic phrases to get you laid.

It's about being a better version of you.
Why is being a better version of you essential to dating and relationships?

Because if your life is shit, why would anyone want to be a part of it?
This book explains why you should strive to be better and how to do it.

The narrator also captures the author's tone and has great clarity.

Essential reading for (potential) entrepreneurs

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-08-24

This is one of the greatest books you can read as a (potential) entrepreneur.
I say "potential" because this book isn't just for entrepreneurs. It's for the men and women who work 9-5 jobs.
This book will convince the average person that the 9-5 isn't the ideal lifestyle.
It'll explain why you should take the "risk" of being an entrepreneur and how to succeed as an entrepreneur.
It'll also show you how to get your business going from a 1 person company to a 100 (and more).

10/10 book.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

Ideas are for a specific group, narration is bad

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-08-24

Firstly, a lot of his ideas are HARD/IMPOSSIBLE to get into. I have a strong belief that this book is only good for people who've already achieved a higher position in a career that they're proficient in. Otherwise, they wouldn't be able to ask their bosses (if they have any) if they can work remotely. Let me make this clear that no one will let you do that unless you're an essential SENIOR employee that a company can't afford to lose.

This book is catered to PROFESSIONALS who sit in front of a computer who have actual OPPORTUNITIES (meaning they're higher up in the corporate ladder and very skilled at what they do), not blue-collar workers, not essential medical employees, etc. As such, this book has a VERY niche group of people that it can relate to. If you're not someone who has ANY opportunities to work remotely, then sorry, this isn't for you. This is LITERALLY the first step in his book.

Now let's get into the narration:

The narrator (unfortunately) can't quite grasp Tim's voice (not literally obviously, I mean figuratively; the way the book was written). The way he narrates is awkward and it's not necessarily his fault. It's the way the book was written.

An example would be when he starts new chapters. Each chapter has a title, a sub-title, a quote from a famous person and his/her accomplishments, and then another quote from a famous person with his/her accomplishments. Each "Step" in the book is another issue.

The narrator would read it like this:

"Step 1
[Name of this Step]

[Insert fancy quote here from some famous successful person blah blah blah] - famous person, [what they're known for.]

Chapter Title
Chapter Sub-Title

[Insert fancy quote here from another famous successful person]- famous person, then what the famous person is known for.

[Insert fancy quote here from another famous successful person]- another famous person, then what the famous person is known for.

[START OF THE ACTUAL CHAPTER]"

If you can't grasp what I'm trying to convey, buy the book and listen to it for about an hour. It's VERY jarring. Not to mention that there are several charts and diagrams in the book.