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Trent T

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 11
  • ratings
  • The Omnivore's Dilemma

  • A Natural History of Four Meals
  • Written by: Michael Pollan
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 15 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 40

"What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another, this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredibly well written and interesting

  • By Trent T on 2019-01-07

Incredibly well written and interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-01-07

Even though this book deals with American food supply chains, it's still definitely a worthwhile read for Canadians, as many of the issues discussed in this book apply to us as well. Michael Pollan is an incredible writer, his style of investigative journalism interlaced with his own anecdotes is a delight to read, it kept me interested the whole way through. It's reshaped the way I view the food industry and what I eat, I think pretty much everyone would take away something from this book. A must read.

  • 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • Written by: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 608
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 514
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 511

Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Harari’s Books are a delight

  • By Jose Amaya on 2018-11-18

It seems like Harari is running out of steam

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-01-07

I've both Sapiens and Homo Deus before this one, and thoroughly enjoyed both of them. Sapiens in particular is one of the most interesting books I've read/listened to. However, this book doesn't really bring that much new to the table. If you've already read his two previous books, you'll notice that he has already covered the vast majority of the content of this book.

Calling it '21 "Lessons" for the 21st Century' is a bit of a stretch, as Harari doesn't really offer much in the way of solutions to the problems we may face in the coming decades. I think calling it '21 Topics for the 21st Century' would've been a more fitting title, as Harari does do a good job at initiating a conversation on these topics, but not necessarily resolving them.

  • Homo Deus

  • A Brief History of Tomorrow
  • Written by: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 14 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 848
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 738
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 730

Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams, and nightmares that will shape the 21st century - from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Accept minor defects and enjoy this book

  • By Anonymous User on 2017-12-10

Not as captivating as Sapiens

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-01-07

I was blown away by Sapiens, it was one of the most thought provoking and even challenging books I have read/listened to. In this book, Harari takes the themes he established in Sapiens and projects them into the future, both near and far. There is quite a lot of overlap between the two books as Harari re-explains many of his ideas from Sapiens, so reading Sapiens isn't a prerequisite for this book.

Harari makes some fascinating arguments in this book, many of which are terrifying. However, it is also highly speculative, so take everything in this book with a grain of salt. If you plan on reading this, I think it's worthwhile to read other books from other futurists as well to get a balanced picture of predictions for the future. On its own it's a rather cold and pessimistic, and it's worth hearing other peoples take on an inherently speculative subject.

Overall I didn't enjoy it nearly as much as Sapiens. As Harari is a historian by trade, I think he was much more talented at writing on that subject. This is still a great book that's worth reading if you don't take it too seriously.

  • The Storm Before the Storm

  • The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic
  • Written by: Mike Duncan
  • Narrated by: Mike Duncan
  • Length: 10 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 166
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 156
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 156

The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. After its founding in 509 BCE, the Romans refused to allow a single leader to seize control of the state and grab absolute power. The Roman commitment to cooperative government and peaceful transfers of power was unmatched in the history of the ancient world. But by the year 133 BCE, the republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, especially for beginners like myself

  • By Stefan J. Knibbe on 2018-02-13

Entertaining, Interesting, Educational

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-01-07

Mike Duncan and his podcast "The History Of Rome" is what got me into podcasts and audiobooks, so I was delighted to hear him return to Rome with this book. It offers a very detailed account of a period of Roman history that often only gets a cursory glance. There's an amazing amount of detail in this book, and Mike Duncan delivers it masterfully. I definitely recommend it to those who love Roman history.

  • From Yao to Mao: 5000 Years of Chinese History

  • Written by: Kenneth J. Hammond, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Kenneth J. Hammond
  • Length: 18 hrs and 14 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13

For most of its 5,000-year existence, China has been the largest, most populous, wealthiest, and mightiest nation on Earth. And for us as Westerners, it is essential to understand where China has been in order to anticipate its future. These 36 eye-opening lectures deliver a comprehensive political and historical overview of one of the most fascinating and complex countries in world history.You'll learn about the powerful dynasties that ruled China for centuries; the philosophical and religious foundations-particularly Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism-that have influenced every iteration of Chinese thought, and the larger-than-life personalities, from both inside and outside its borders, of those who have shaped China's history. As you listen to these lectures, you'll see how China's politics, economics, and art reflect the forces of its past.From the "Mandate of Heaven," a theory of social contract in place by 1500 B.C.E., 3,000 years before Western philosophers such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, to the development of agriculture and writing independent of outside influence to the technologically-advanced Han Dynasty during the time of the Roman Empire, this course takes you on a journey across ground that has been largely unexplored in the history courses most of us in the West have taken.In guiding you through the five millennia of China's history, Professor Hammond tells a fascinating story with an immense scope, a welcome reminder that China is no stranger to that stage and, indeed, has more often than not been the most extraordinary player on it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Comprehensive review of China's history

  • By Trent T on 2019-01-07

Comprehensive review of China's history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-01-07

There is A LOT of history that is covered in this lecture series, as the title would suggest. As someone who didn't know much about Chinese history, there was a lot I learned from the course. Unfortunately, the professor was not the most exciting person to listen to, in fact he is one of the weakest speakers I have heard from The Great Courses. Nonetheless it's still a great introduction to Chinese history and it's loaded with interesting information, even if it's delivered in an uninteresting way.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World

  • Written by: Robert Garland, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Robert Garland
  • Length: 24 hrs and 28 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 59

Look beyond the abstract dates and figures, kings and queens, and battles and wars that make up so many historical accounts. Over the course of 48 richly detailed lectures, Professor Garland covers the breadth and depth of human history from the perspective of the so-called ordinary people, from its earliest beginnings through the Middle Ages.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it!

  • By Trent T on 2018-10-29

Loved it!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-10-29

I've always enjoyed learning about history, but I've always thought that most of history focuses on the powerful elite, Kings, Emperors and the wars they fought, etc. I've often wondered what the mundane details of life were like for the common person. What beliefs did they hold? What was their daily routine like? If you are like me in this regard, then you absolutely have to get this lecture series. The professor does an amazing job at bringing the details of daily ancient life into focus. Historical writings have left out so many of the details of what life was really like, and the professor does an incredible job at them in.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Sapiens

  • A Brief History of Humankind
  • Written by: Yuval Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,618
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,279
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,271

In Sapiens, Dr. Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical - and sometimes devastating - breakthroughs of the cognitive, agricultural, and scientific revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology, and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'll definitely listen to this again.

  • By Shea Earl on 2017-11-25

A profound look at our collective human history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-10-29

This book changed not only the way I view history, but human society as a whole. It's incredibly thought provoking and will almost certainly challenge your views, whatever they may be. You may not agree with everything the author says, but his arguments are certainly well worth the listen. If you have any interest in history, or even sociology, this is a must read.