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Bennymac

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  • helpful votes
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Medicore

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2020-01-10

I was pretty disappointed with this one given all the good ratings. I managed to make it throw about 2/3 of the book before the bit on randomness of billing and changing costs was the final straw and I stopped there. To me, this book had the feel of someone who's gotten fairly lucky and done well financially but cant quite articulate the specifics as to how to replicate it for others. Or maybe the author has been successful in a certain niche but it's one that customers are already feeling hopeful to want to believe in - 'you dont have to work hard, you deserve success, you're a powerful force and and the universe should recognize you, ...'. Sort of a mix of manifesting success, sending out positive vibrations to the universe, ignore detractors, and live your passion. If you're a fan of Gwyneth Paltrow and goop, this is probably in your wheelhouse. My main take-aways are that its possible to be successful without having significant planning and strategy right out of the gate, you may need to try a bunch of different avenues before finding something that works for you, and that there's probably more people just figuring it out as they go than you realize.

4 people found this helpful

I'd Pass

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-09-29

The book is pretty well done; however, it's likely one that is better read than enjoyed in audible format. There's a lot of reference to tables and figures, which would be better understood if they were in hand. There is quite a comprehensive list of options to assist in reducing carbon emissions, but no real surprises or unheard of techniques / technologies etc. And the reader has probably THE most automaton-sounding voice I've ever heard. Literally on par with automated text-to-voice technology. If you already have some interest and knowledge in climate change mitigation or reducing your carbon footprint, you likely won't learn anything new from this one.

Grain of Salt

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-08-14

This was a bit of an odd one. The general take-home messages are ok, but the book feels as though it was written by someone stuck in a different generation, educated years ago, and who grew up in a stringent, religious household. There are a lot of stereotypes to wade through (real men look like the Brawny towels guy, watch football, drink beer, hunt, and build engines) while women are emotional. There is also a significant push to introduce the daughter to god. Further, weed is a gateway drug, the interweb is the devil and those without religious faith are doomed. The narrator also has an odd habit of pronouncing ‘dad’ like ‘dahhht’ - a minor gripe but still somewhat distracting. I think the author weighs on her credentials and a few carefully selected research articles to win arguments, but the majority of what is written is opinion. Mostly well intentioned but could be updated for more progressive and modern parenting styles.

Politics

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-03-11

Upfront disclosure: I came into this as leaning towards the left, politically, with no real strong opinion of Harper. I guess I was hoping to get some insight as to how right-leaning conservatives hope to see the world proceed and what conservative priorities are. Maybe I'm missing something that they're seeing? This felt more like Harper giving himself a pat on the back for his time as PM, grouping anyone more liberal than his conservatives as essentially idiotic, and giving nods to Trump's accomplishments. Anybody who can give any credibility to Trump and will pretend that Trump has any sort of coherent, formal strategy has lost my confidence on that basis alone. It was also ironic that Harper weighs in on what happened in the US to see Trump elected over Clinton, but in no instance does he take a stab at how he got walked out the door himself, even though there is likely parallels and significant overlap (i.e. using hindsight to appear knowledgeable). The book felt more like a speech that would be given at a Conservative fundraiser, bolstering pre-existing commitment to the organization, with language such as "we, as conservatives, must..." and "i'm confident that our party...". It felt like a good example of confirmation bias to be shared amongst conservatives, rather than providing outsiders with convincing, stand-alone arguments that demonstrate how conservative ideology can be successful. It's by no means an objective look at our state of affairs and I would continue to keep it at arms length without significant fact-finding to support its arguments. I'm walking away with more disdain for politicians in general, less respect for Harper specifically.

2 people found this helpful

New Perspective

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-12-12

I listened to this book after recently finishing a few other biographies - David Space, Arnold Schwarzenegger etc. While I felt either unchanged or to have lost respect for those individuals after getting through their books, I feel as though I have a greater level of respect for Rob after finishing this one. There is some honesty, realness, truth and insight in this book which helps appreciate the life he's lived, his understanding of his place in the industry, and how a life of success can have drawbacks. Also great that he read the book himself as well.

1 person found this helpful

Unsatisfied

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-11-24

I had read other reviews before getting into this one. I was hoping to hear about the grandeur of Arnold’s life but it seemed like he skimmed over a lot of things. I suppose each accomplishment could be a book unto itself but he seemed to gloss over the emotional impact of each major event in his life. I was disappointed in his personal character in the ways in which he did not open up to his family about significant events and changes (heart valve replacement, running for governor etc). My new view of Arnold after listening to this book is of someone who put in some work, but was unbelievably lucky in the ways that numerous people put work into him and his career, even his finances to build his wealth. There is no thanks given by him to those people in the book. There are a lot of instances in which he seems to charge forward without considering others. I definitely feel for Maria in the ways in which Arnold walked all over her, and made himself the priority. It also feels more like an example of ‘a thousand monkeys at a thousand typewriters...’ but in his case, a team of monkeys have prepared him things to type, a quicker typewriter, better paper, publicity, support, and access to publishers. Very disappointing he also didn’t read the book himself.

2 people found this helpful

Filler Content

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-06-26

I was disappointed with this one. I had expected the book to primarily focus on 'discovering your calling..' but found that it was only the first chapter or two that spoke to that topic. The remainder was mostly along the lines of life hacks that you've likely heard elsewhere - get enough sleep, look people in the eye, remember others' names and use it when you speak with them etc. It had the feeling of going off on tangents that don't specifically relate to finding your calling. The chapters that did speak to finding your calling were also material commonly found elsewhere - write a list of the things you enjoy, write a list of the things you dont enjoy, steer towards the things you enjoy..... The performance on the audiobook was suitable but I'd recommend to others to start with another title if they're looking for helping figure out a calling / career plan.