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  • On the Brink of Everything: Grace, Gravity, and Getting Old

  • Written by: Parker J. Palmer
  • Narrated by: Steve Carlson
  • Length: 5 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

Reframing aging as "a passage of discovery and engagement", Palmer says, "Old is just another word for nothing left to lose, a time to take bigger risks on behalf of the common good." On the Brink of Everything is not a "guide to" or "handbook for" getting old. Instead, it's Palmer turning the prism of insight on his experience as a way of encouraging listeners to do the same with theirs. In elegant prose and lyrical poetry, he offers a set of meditations on the meanings of one's life - past, present, and future.  

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A feel good read

  • By Amazon Customer on 2019-06-24

A feel good read

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-06-24

Palmer claims “overriding gratitude” as his view from the brink at the end of life. He does not acknowledge fully that overriding gratitude is like other mental states including the depression that he has experienced. It is temporary.

This book is an unfocussed ramble with honest self revelation in places. He is honest about the limits of his and human knowledge. Overall the book leaves the reader feeling good, which makes it difficult to critique. Maybe I’m a curmudgeon, but I’ll take Atwood’s cutting realism with respect to human nature over Palmers sometimes accepting and sometimes judgemental approach.

  • Lost Connections

  • Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression - and the Unexpected Solutions
  • Written by: Johann Hari
  • Narrated by: Johann Hari
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 274
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 251
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 249

From the New York Times best-selling author of Chasing the Scream, a radically new way of thinking about depression and anxiety. What really causes depression and anxiety - and how can we really solve them?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • life changing and narrated conversationally

  • By Deraek on 2018-12-08

A moving account of human connection

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-12-03

Our culture encourages a lack of social connection, then encourages us to label the resulting disorders as mental illness and to treat that with drugs. This account explores the science, pseudoscience and economic drivers behind those attitudes. It also describes ways of reconnecting, reestablishing compassion as a core value. Hari is very clear that economic insecurity and workaholism can be helped by introducing a guaranteed basic income, and that pilot projects show this reduces anxiety and depression. He covers a lot of ground in a coherent way.

  • The Wolves of Winter

  • Written by: Tyrell Johnson
  • Narrated by: Jayme Mattler
  • Length: 8 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 22

The old world has been ravaged by war and disease, and as far as Lynn McBride is concerned, her family could be the last one left on earth. For seven years, the McBrides have eked out a meagre existence in the still, white wilderness of the Yukon. But this is not living. This is survival on the brink. Into this fragile community walk new threats, including the enigmatic fugitive, Jax, who holds secrets about the past and, possibly, keys to a better future.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A little too cheesey

  • By Blair Fay on 2018-08-08

Adventure-heroic

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-11-12

Good people, bad people, even some that are a mixture. Straight forward post apocalypse story with love interest.

  • Eichmann in Jerusalem

  • A Report on the Banality of Evil
  • Written by: Hannah Arendt
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12

Sparking a flurry of heated debate, Hannah Arendt's authoritative and stunning report on the trial of German Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared in The New Yorker in 1963. This revised edition includes material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt's postscript. A major journalistic triumph by an intellectual of singular influence, Eichmann in Jerusalem is as shocking as it is informative - an unflinching look at one of the most unsettling (and unsettled) issues of the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Small Man

  • By Amazon Customer on 2019-02-01

World War II continues

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-09-19

Vengeance is mine saith the Lord. Except that vengeance is human, so is the idea promoted here that justice is done when a murderer dies. Perhaps someday we will get past that idea. #Audible1

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • What Makes You Not a Buddhist

  • Written by: Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse
  • Narrated by: Tom Pile
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

Tibetan Buddhist master Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse, one of the most creative and innovative lamas teaching today, throws down the gauntlet to the Buddhist world, challenging common misconceptions, stereotypes, and fantasies. With wit and irony, Khysentse urges readers to move beyond the superficial trappings of Buddhism - beyond the romance with beads, incense, or exotic robes - straight to the heart of what the Buddha taught.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truth

  • By Amazon Customer on 2018-06-23

Truth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-06-23

Very straightforward, but can only be fully understood when the reader is ready to hear it!

  • The Last Family in England

  • Written by: Matt Haig
  • Narrated by: Mark Meadows
  • Length: 8 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 1

Meet the Hunter family: Adam, Kate, and their children, Hal and Charlotte. And Prince, their black Labrador. Prince is an earnest young dog, striving hard to live up to the tenets of the Labrador Pact (Remain Loyal to Your Human Masters, Serve and Protect Your Family at Any Cost). Other dogs, led by the Springer Spaniels, have revolted. As things in the Hunter family begin to go badly awry - marital breakdown, rowdy teenage parties, attempted suicide - Prince's responsibilities threaten to overwhelm him and he is forced to break the Labrador Pact.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not the best Haig

  • By Amazon Customer on 2018-04-25

Not the best Haig

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-04-25

The Humans was very funny and fresh in its dog’s eye view of the human condition. I bought this book hoping for equally fresh material, but it seems contrived and a bit boring. I will certainly try more Haig, but this is not his best. Try the humans instead!

  • Being Wrong

  • Adventures in the Margin of Error
  • Written by: Kathryn Schulz
  • Narrated by: Mia Barron
  • Length: 14 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

To err is human. Yet most of us go through life assuming (and sometimes insisting) that we are right about nearly everything, from the origins of the universe to how to load the dishwasher. If being wrong is so natural, why are we all so bad at imagining that our beliefs could be mistaken, and why do we react to our errors with surprise, denial, defensiveness, and shame?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Being wrong, making it admissible

  • By Amazon Customer on 2018-04-08

Being wrong, making it admissible

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-04-08

Great descriptions of our horror when seeing our own errors. Discussion of how we learn, how we avoid the destruction of our illusory rightness by refusing to admit error, or having changed our minds how we revise our past opinions. Easy to listen to, read with energy, essential reading for recovering perfectionists like me!

  • The Moral Animal

  • Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology
  • Written by: Robert Wright
  • Narrated by: Greg Thornton
  • Length: 16 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 18

Are men literally born to cheat? Does monogamy actually serve women's interests? These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years. Wright unveils the genetic strategies behind everything from our sexual preferences to our office politics - as well as their implications for our moral codes and public policies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wright on

  • By Amazon Customer on 2017-11-13

Wright on

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2017-11-13

Informative, logical, well written. This book showed how biological evolution can explain much otherwise puzzling human behaviour.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful