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  • Silent Child

  • Audible's Thriller of 2017
  • Written by: Sarah A. Denzil
  • Narrated by: Joanne Froggatt
  • Length: 9 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 395
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 370
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 370

Introducing Audible's Thriller of the Year: Silent Child by Sarah A. Denzil, performed by Joanne Froggatt. In the summer of 2006, Emma Price watched helplessly as her six-year-old son's red coat was fished out of the River Ouse. It was the tragic story of the year - a little boy, Aiden, wandered away from school during a terrible flood, fell into the river, and drowned. His body was never recovered. Ten years later Emma has finally rediscovered the joy in life...until Aiden returns.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wish it'd been even longer!

  • By Ola Maria on 2017-09-01

An Utter Mess

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-05-04

The Silent Child is a story so marred with erratic logic and delivery that it was difficult to appreciate any of the supposed “thrills”. The only saving grace is Joanne Froggatt’s reading of the story. She is versatile in her tone and on point with her emotions. Sometimes you can tell the personalities of the characters by her voice alone. She had certainly became one of my favourite readers.

That been said, Joanne Froggatt could not save the mess that is of the Silent Child. I have never read any other book by Sarah A. Denzil, but this book alone would make me want to shy away from any of her other works. The issue lies in her characterization. Without going into the specifics, not much actually happen in the story, there is no real active progression of the plot and everything plows along from one dreary event to another. There is also no “normal baseline “ for her characters, they are either bumbling emotionless drones to high strung hysterics.

Every single one of her characters would be awful to have around as a real individual because they seem to love to create drama when there is none. Perhaps that is what the author is trying to portray, but it makes the story not even remotely relatable. A good story is meant to suck you in, immerse you in a tale that you will otherwise not experience. The Silent Child does not offer this. The event in the story is so sporadic that I was irked from one mindset to another. One moment the main character is accusing others of being unfair and the next moment she does the very things she hates. And because the characters are more like caricatures, I care very little for anyone in the book. If it wasn’t for the fact that I force myself to finish every book that I start, I would have long returned it and asked for a refund. When the final line is read and the book wrapped, I’m just glad to delete it for good.

  • Death's End

  • Written by: Cixin Liu, Ken Liu - translator
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
  • Length: 28 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 106
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

Half a century after the Doomsday Battle, the uneasy balance of Dark Forest Deterrence keeps the Trisolaran invaders at bay. Earth enjoys unprecedented prosperity due to the infusion of Trisolaran knowledge. With human science advancing daily and the Trisolarans adopting Earth culture, it seems that the two civilizations will soon be able to coexist peacefully as equals, without the terrible threat of mutually assured annihilation. But the peace has also made humanity complacent.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • excellent conclusion to an epic series.

  • By Mickey on 2018-01-20

A Whimpering End

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-04-27

It has became a theme almost of this trilogy to deal with world event with a flat human emotion. Hence, when Cixin Liu tries to create a female character who is supposed to embody a motherly emotion, the result is of an unconvincing mess. There is a strong push for the idea of the first two book to be pushed to a grander scale but the idea of cosmic sociology just isn’t well developed by the author to do so. And the end became an atomic bang of nothingness. A truly unfulfilled ending.