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Quadratic

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Index badly needed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2020-08-19

This collection is in desperate need of titles to the chapters. To help with that, this is an index written by an Amazon.com reviewer named "chuck": Start Essay 00:00:00 1) The Grand Miracle 00:21:25 2) Is Theology Poetry? 00:55:35 3) The Funeral of a Great Myth 01:26:52 4) God In the Dark 01:39:14 5) What Are We to Make of Jesus Christ? 01:50:53 6) The World’s Last Night 02:25:09 7) Is Theism Important? 02:35:45 8) The Seeing Eye 02:57:58 9) Must Our Image of God Go? 03:01:23 10) Christianity and Culture 04:05:30 11) Evil and God 04:14:07 12) The Weight of Glory 04:45:44 13) Miracles 05:18:54 14) Dogma and the Universe 05:42:43 15) The Horrid Red Things 05:51:58 16) Religion: Reality or Substitute? 06:10:10 17) Myth Became Fact 06:22:22 18) Religion and Science 06:29:46 19) Christian Apologetics 07:04:21 20) Work and Prayer 07:12:02 21) Religion Without Dogma? 07:55:00 22) The Decline of Religion 08:08:09 23) Unforgiveness 08:16:37 24) The Pains of Animals 08:43:20 25) Petitionary Prayer: A Problem Without an Answer 09:06:28 26) On Obstinacy in Belief 09:36:03 27) What Christmas Means to Me 09:40:18 28) The Psalms 10:19:15 29) Religion and Rocketry 10:35:42 30) The Efficacy of Prayer 10:49:29 31) Fern Seed and Elephants 11:25:59 32) The Language of Religion 11:58:42 33) Transposition 12:34:04 34) Why I am Not a Pacifist 13:12:04 35) Dangers of National Repentance 13:19:02 36) Two Ways With the Self 13:24:01 37) Meditation on the Third Commandment 13:32:29 38) On Ethics 14:06:13 39) Three Kinds of Men 14:09:30 40) Answers to Questions on Christianity 14:40:31 41) The Laws of Nature 14:48:58 42) Membership 15:15:03 43) The Sermon and the Lunch 15:26:43 44) Scraps 15:29:49 45) After Priggery – What? 15:39:21 46) Man or Rabbit? 15:51:47 47) The Trouble With X 16:02:00 48) On Living in an Atomic Age 16:17:21 49) Lillies that Fester 16:48:51 50) Good Work and Good Works 17:06:20 51) A Slip of the Tongue 17:18:44 52) We Have No Right to Happiness 17:32:08 53) Christian Reunion: An Anglican Speaks to Roman Catholics 17:39:16 54) Priestesses in the Church? 17:53:30 55) On Church Music 18:07:12 56) Christianity and Literature 18:33:28 57) High and Low Brows 19:07:54 58) Is English Doomed? 19:16:58 59) On the Reading of Old Books 19:31:50 60) The Parthenon and the Optative 19:39:56 61) The Death of Words 19:47:06 62) On Science Fiction 20:21:27 63) Miserable Offenders 20:33:09 64) Different Tastes in Literature 20:50:18 65) Modern Translations of the Bible 21:00:28 66) On Juvenile Tastes 21:07:02 67) Sex in Literature 21:14:00 68) The Hobbit 21:17:03 69) Period Criticism 21:27:16 70) On Stories 22:10:34 71) On Three Ways of Writing for Children 22:40:43 72) Prudery and Philology 22:49:41 73) Tolkein’s “The Lord of the Rings” 23:07:31 74) Sometimes Fairy Stories May Say Best What’s to Be Said 23:15:38 75) It All Began With a Picture 23:17:54 76) Unreal Estates 23:40:58 77) On Criticism 24:16:38 78) Cross Examination 24:33:39 79) A Tribute to E.R. Eddison 24:35:15 80) The Mythopoeic Gift of Rider Haggard 24:44:59 81) George Orwell 24:53:37 82) A Panegyric for Dorothy L. Sayers 25:03:24 83) The Novels of Charles Williams 25:20:03 84) Learning in War-Time 25:43:51 85) Bulverism (or, The Foundation of 20th Century Thought) 25:55:13 86) The Founding of the Oxford Socratic Club 26:01:56 87) My First School 26:09:37 88) Democratic Education 26:19:09 89) Blimpophobia 26:26:26 90) Private Bates 26:34:16 91) Meditation in a Tool Shed 26:43:55 92) On the Transmission of Christianity 26:57:30 93) Modern Man and His Categories of Thought 27:11:02 94) Historicism 27:46:59 95) The Empty Universe 27:58:36 96) Interim Report 28:12:12 97) Is History Bunk? 28:21:26 98) Before We Can Communicate 28:29:54 99) First and Second Things 28:39:32 100) The Poison of Subjectivism 29:05:59 101) Equality 29:14:25 102) De Futilitate 29:52:43 103) A Dream 29:59:49 104) Hedonics 30:11:13 105) Talking About Bicycles 30:22:01 106) Vivisection 30:33:41 107) The Humanitarian Theory of Punishment 31:07:08 108) Behind the Scenes 31:17:41 109) The Necessity of Chivalry 31:26:45 110) The Inner Ring 31:50:26 111) Two Lectures 31:58:20 112) Some Thoughts 32:06:47 113) X-mas and Christmas 32:13:42 114) Revival or Decay 32:23:06 115) Delinquents in the Snow 32:33:40 116) Willing Slaves of the Welfare State 32:48:10 117) Screwtape Proposes a Toast Start Letters 33:24:21 118) The Conditions for a Just War 33:30:18 119) The Conflict in Anglican Theology 33:31:11 120) Miracles 33:33:12 121) Mr. C.S. Lewis on Christianity 33:35:19 122) A Village Experience 33:36:50 123) Correspondence With an Anglican Who Dislikes Hymns 33:39:56 124) The Church’s Liturgy, Invocation, and Invocation of Saints 33:48:49 125) The Holy Name 33:50:36 126) Mere Christians 33:52:16 127) Canonization 33:55:08 128) Pittenger-Lewis and Version Vernacular 33:57:01 129) Capital Punishment and Death Penalty Start Short Stories 34:01:01 130) The Man Born Blind 34:12:31 131) The Dark Tower 35:16:16 132) The Dark Tower (continued) 36:15:57 133) The Dark Tower (continued) 37:07:58 134) Ministering Angels 37:31:23 135) The Shoddy Lands 37:49:13 136) After Ten Years 38:38:46 137) Forms of Things Unknown

4 people found this helpful

Well-researched, though imbalanced by a narrative

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-11-21

It's an excellent book for making the case that it sets out to make. Clearly well-researched, and (at least for someone as boring as me) it was an interesting read with minimal filler (though one or two chapters may qualify). My only substantive problem with it is that it felt like the plaintiff's argument on its own, with the facts honed to a particular ideology, anthropomorphizing an industry into a being that can be judged across generations, with no real attempt to explore rebuttal offered by the *individuals* named. In a word, it needs more balance. The audio quality is fine. I marked it 4 stars there because the bar has been raised elsewhere on audible and because the (bizarre) step was taken to play a Russian song in the middle of the book. That's right up there with Tolkien's random elf poetry. Could have been left out.

Good counterweight to Basic Economics

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-11-21

This book was helpful as a layperson to get a better understanding of left-wing thought on the topic. My only criticism is that these authors do apply principles a bit inconsistently in favour of what I can clearly read as their political orientation. They're fast to point out correlation is not causation with respect to tax cuts for the wealthy and economic growth (even while admitting there is growth, and that they don't know what is really creating it), yet when this same lack of causal connection exists for left-leaning theories, they seem to embrace the correlation as evidence and a reason to push forward. In large part that's human nature, and for me it was actually a bit helpful in using this book as a counterweight to the more individualistic economic thinkers like Sowell. Maybe my best praise is that I filled an A4 page of small-print, concise "interesting notes" on this book, which (for the book's size) is higher than my average, and I mainly only read real classics so that says something.

2 people found this helpful

Excellent narration.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-07-02

For classics such as these, the only real way you can judge it from an audio book perspective is narration, for which they did a really good job with this. Letters in Dracula are read by actors playing the role of each letter's author. This way of telling the story really helps to separate the chapters as distinct letters from distinct points of view, rather than having us misunderstand it to be a chapter-by-chapter novel (as would otherwise be easily confused by having one person read the letters one after the other as written). It makes it very easy to follow. Frankenstein was excellent also. Clear, distinct voices for each of the main characters really brings it to life. Well acted throughout.

Great narration. Historically biased writing.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-06-10

My main problem with this book is that the author goes beyond the facts and inserts his own narrative. It's fine to point out when Napoleon said something that the facts don't support. It's also fair to draw comparisons of alleged war crimes with actions taken by other countries commonly at the time. What's not fine as an historian is to insert your own moral judgements into the text. Let the reader conclude from the data what to believe about Napoleon. Don't outright tell the reader that what he did was good, or what he did was bad. It's also not fine to put yourself into Napoleon's mind and assert his motives throughout his life. Stick to the facts as we know them, outlining how we've come to know them, but stop there. No complaints about the audio work. It's top notch.

3 people found this helpful

Excellent narration, and very engaging biography

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-05-31

The book is thoroughly sourced, where the author goes through Churchill's life with referencing memoirs, government records, personal accounts, etc., all with an effort to piece together a true picture of the man. The narration is top tier.

Saddening

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-03-27

I was actually saddened by this book, in how a person can view the world and her circumstances as negatively as she does. I'll account but one example here. The first section of the book details her growing up in a two-parent middle-class home in the 1970's, in the United States. She accounts how the piano she took classes on was not tuned properly, and there may have been some broken keys, which she realized after playing later on a nice grande piano shortly after. It is simply amazing that people before us set up a system of strings of particular length and thickness, aligning them in such a way for them to play particular tones at a keystroke, ordering them by semi-tone. It's amazing that people would develop a skill on top of that, to arrange the playing of notes in such a way as to create music with their hands off of those strings. It's amazing that people further developed a system of language to music, and that people before her birth designed musical pieces for others to play and to practice. The very fact that she was able to play the piano at night, with electricity, puts her above almost all humans in history in terms of opportunity and privilege. Instead of seeing any of that and being grateful, she ends that section by pointing out how - she imagines - some of the other children probably had better pianos than she did, that they were probably tuned closer to that grande piano than hers was, and probably didn't have broken keys. Thus, she probably had less privilege than other people did, and for this we should really take note. I really did view pianos that way (the positive way) when I was a kid. Heck, every day I was in continual amazement at how many things people set up for us. I was amazed that a stranger actually comes to our house every week to take our garbage away forever. I was amazed at the idea of a television. I didn't have access to a piano as she did, but their very existence on this earth was amazing to me, and I was grateful to be in a world where such things even existed. I strongly urge potential readers not to learn from this person. There are far better ways to look at life than through the dance of mimetic desire, looking for crisis and scapegoats in the form of oppressors. The one value in this book is that she seems unaware of this condition of her character, giving us a brutally honest exposition because she does not know to guard it.

7 people found this helpful

Very close to the mark

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-03-21

The author has done several hard things very well in this book, although there are some misses here. I don't feel the author has correctly understood the kind of ally Kant was in this narrative, as one who highlighted the importance of revelation, and one whose usage of the word "reason" was so expansive that he could easily be mischaracterized as one who would ever want reason without faith. This book desperately needs someone like René Girard in this conversation, and John 6's "To whom shall we go?". I feel as though the author is just observing the phenomena across history rather than really getting to understand the mechanisms at play. For the final advice to be individualistic appeals to western values, I can understand that leaning from a right-leaning author, but the problem is memetic and the solution is the exposition and despelling of that memeticism.

1 person found this helpful

Starts off pretty slow

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-03-07

The second half of this book is what I thought the book would be (a breakdown of key Talmudic concepts across the various categories of thought touched on by the volumes). I felt, though, that the amount of focus on the historical background of the development of the Talmud was much more than warranted. The first half is a history book, and the second is an essential breakdown of the Talmud.

1 person found this helpful

Karl Marx's History of the United States

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-02-19

My first impression of the book was that the author was telling the American story from the perspective of "the people" as the title and preface suggest. My second impression was that he was telling that story from the perspective only of the poor and down-trodden. After the second or third positive reference to Karl Marx, I realized that this is not a book trying to put a spotlight on the poor at all, but rather on the bourgeoisie and their oppression of the proletariat. In other words, this is a book about communism, thinly veiled. I'm not a historian, but I've read enough letters and quotes from some of these figures to say that this author is putting a number of American heroes in their worst possible light, such that this book will give you far from a balanced, multi-lateral understanding of US history. At times the author sounds like a conspiracy theorist, attributing the most nefarious motives to people like Madison, Jefferson, and Lincon, so far as to suggest the US constitution itself was a deliberate deception put on by the privileged few rich people to control the masses. Insofar as a nation is defined by its values and ideals rather than its people, I think I can comfortably say that this author hates the United States of America, its founding document, its founders as people, and nearly all of its heroes. Cliché as this may sound, this author does not see the United States for the vanguard of freedom that it has been for the last century, and he thoroughly does not understand much less love the country he is writing about.

4 people found this helpful