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David M. Sullivan

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A lot of palaver

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-12-11

On his broad shoulders through the checkerwork of leaves the sun flung spangles, dancing coins.

A new hope

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-10-15

Smart and sassy cross between “Frankenstein” and “A Canticle for Liebowitz,” set on terraformed worlds with genetically modified inhabitants, and brilliantly read.

Likeable if not lovable

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-02-21

A long and complex story told by a saint. Her many tears become a bit wearying at times, but that was the age. A rather darker, less comic novel, compared to other Dickens stories, and perhaps that absence is what makes the piece seem to drag on, especially at the end, where Dickens spends a lot of time rewarding saints and punishing sinners. Critics seem to prefer "Bleak House" overall, but to my mind what is impressive in the book comes at the expense of what is loveable. To each his own. Ms. Margoyles is an excellent reader and "do the voices" as any good Dickens reader should, though perhaps understandably, better with female than male voices.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

Masterful Tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-01-22

A dramatic tale masterfully told, with a broad cast of characters vividly drawn, and the whole complex story drawn up in highly polished form. Mr. Barrett “do the voices” in fine style.

Great biography of a great man

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-02-07

I've both read and listened to Boswell's Life of Johnson with equal pleasure. Johnson was truly a great man, and Boswell's Life captures the great man in all his complexities. We don't have a recording of Samuel Johnson in conversation but I hope he resembled the fine, aged-in-oak performance of Bernard Mayes. Mr. Mayes, though an excellent reader in all his voices, saves a special character for Johnson himself, and is so conscious even to add decrepitude to his delivery as the great man approaches his end. I didn't remember nearly enough of the biography from my initial reading; I hope to remember much more from the Audible recording.

They Left Us Everything cover art

Death by detail

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2017-12-11

A 63-year-old daughter of recently deceased parents rambles through 23 rooms of stuff in the family home and over 180 years of collective memories. This story - if it can be called that, for the lives here reconstructed are pieced together out of a welter of rather tiny individual events, assembled rather at random - is not without humour, pathos or instruction for a survivor of aged and loved parents, but for this reader far too many of the memories are of a personal nature, lacking in enough anecdotal, dramatic or symbolic interest for the general reader. This book is subtitled a memoir, though as the author admits - if admits is the right word - that her parents were ordinary people, which to my mind limits the appeal of a book that to me seems almost like a compendium aimed at interfamilial use.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful