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  • 6
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  • Something in the Water

  • Written by: Catherine Steadman
  • Narrated by: Catherine Steadman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 250
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 246

Erin is a documentary filmmaker on the brink of a professional breakthrough, Mark a handsome investment banker with big plans. Passionately in love, they embark on a dream honeymoon to the tropical island of Bora Bora, where they enjoy the sun, the sand, and each other. Then, while scuba diving in the crystal blue sea, they find something in the water....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it!!

  • By T Lynch on 2018-06-21

Every minute was fascinating!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-07-13

As much as I admire the whole adventure and especially the author's narration, I'm feeling very uneasy about the way the story seems to have worked out. Is Erin in touch with reality? How many favours will Eddie ask of her? What happened to her conscience? It's as though it got washed away, like some intangible thing in the water.

But this is a marvellous debut novel! I loved the grave-digger opening--brilliantly compelling! Not a male shovelling, but a young woman who instantly makes us care about her. Not about the meaning of death, but a meditation on the physical stamina required of the living to dig a grave and how that marathon affects consciousness. Stunning!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Remains of the Day

  • Written by: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: Dominic West
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 13

Kazuo Ishiguro's Booker Prize-winning masterpiece became an international best seller on publication, was adapted into an award-winning film, and has since come to be regarded as a modern classic. The Remains of the Day is a spellbinding portrayal of a vanished way of life and a haunting meditation on the high cost of duty. It is also one of the most subtle, sad, and humorous love stories ever written.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Layer upon Layer of Nuance and Ambiguity!

  • By Amazon Customer on 2018-06-23

Layer upon Layer of Nuance and Ambiguity!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-06-23

Despite the historical context of this work, the book is about the butler Stevens and how he represents the appalling narrowness of the old British class system. Is Stevens merely an unreliable narrator, or is he so clueless about himself that he actually believes all his excuses for hiding from life? Often I thought him an idiot, even a liar, and wondered how Miss Kenton, with all her intelligence and spark, could ever think of him! But the character of Stevens grows more complex as he reflects the rigid imperatives he espouses with obsessive loyalty and zeal. His pomposity seems ridiculous and amusing at first, but by the end of the story the very ideals he holds so tenaciously-- like an oxygen mask to his face as his world suddenly plummets-- have become strangely courageous. He is a victim of his own failure to connect with his emotions, but he is also a victim of the fated British ideals that bring down his hero, Lord Darlington. By the end, poor Stevens knows only how to pretend (as Miss Kenton once accused him of), but he plays his role as a paradox that has become somehow moving, even tragic.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Warlight

  • Written by: Michael Ondaatje
  • Narrated by: Steve West
  • Length: 8 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39

In a narrative as beguiling and mysterious as memory itself - shadowed and luminous at once - we hear the story of 14-year-old Nathaniel, and his older sister, Rachel. In 1945, just after World War II, they stay behind in London when their parents move to Singapore, leaving them in the care of a mysterious figure named The Moth. They suspect he might be a criminal, and they grow both more convinced and less concerned as they come to know his eccentric crew of friends.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Work of Moving Sensitivity and Expansive Range!

  • By Amazon Customer on 2018-06-11

A Work of Moving Sensitivity and Expansive Range!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-06-11

How does Michael Ondaatje know so much about war and the hidden things in governments, as well as England, the Thames, nature, and human nature? I love the way the central mystery unfolds from the viewpoint of a teenaged boy who is abandoned with his sister by their parents after WWII. The human search for oneself and for knowledge of one's parents is made more urgent and bewildering than normal by the numbing silence around a mother who leaves voluntarily, deliberately misleading her offspring about her purpose.The whole story shines dimly from darkness, feeling like the liquid murkiness of inner consciousness. People appear and disappear, the characters move from place to place as in a dream. There is a pervasive sense of danger, but also a deep love for small ordinary things, which uplifts and gives relief. The love of dogs and nature touched my heart in the midst of my shock and distress at the larger story. Such things do go on hidden from us--as the recent poisoning of the Scripals, father and daughter, bizarrely attests.

Steve West reads it all gently in a beautiful voice!

I feel expanded by this book; its nuances will stay with me.

  • West Cork

  • Written by: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Narrated by: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Length: 7 hrs and 52 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 839
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 750
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 748

This much we do know: Sophie Toscan du Plantier was murdered days before Christmas in 1996, her broken body discovered at the edge of her property near the town of Schull in West Cork, Ireland. The rest remains a mystery. Gripping, yet ever elusive, join the real-life hunt for answers in the year’s first not-to-be-missed, true-crime series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It was really good!

  • By AmyLee on 2018-02-19

He did it!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-05-02

Isn't there something about killers who need to be the centre of attention? Isn't he just such a one? How can he still be getting away with it? He can't be believed any more than any of the others in West Cork, yet he seems to be. These outrageous blocks to justice are happening around us now in the world, where guilty liars are not arrested. Why? They seem to share an appalling narcissism in being at the centre, which prevents the law from touching them. In 2015, I spent a month in West Cork on the Beara Peninsula beyond Castletownbere. Oh it is magical country. I felt the fairies and little mischievous spirits on my solitary walks, and the mischief of Mishkish! It really is like the end of the world there in a gorgeous way. But had I known about Sophie, I may not have walked alone so much. It's almost as if the spirits of the land are somehow not allowing resolution by mortal means.

  • Never Let Me Go

  • Written by: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: Rosalyn Landor
  • Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31

From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Remains of the Day comes an unforgettable edge-of-your-seat mystery that is at once heartbreakingly tender and morally courageous about what it means to be human. Hailsham seems like a pleasant English boarding school, far from the influences of the city. Its students are well tended and supported, trained in art and literature, and become just the sort of people the world wants them to be. But, curiously, they are taught nothing of the outside world and are allowed little contact with it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Brilliant Condemnation of Science Without Soul

  • By Amazon Customer on 2018-04-19

A Brilliant Condemnation of Science Without Soul

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-04-19

This story breaks your heart by slow, horrifying degrees. I'll need time to recover from it.

  • Remembrance of Things Past

  • Swann's Way
  • Written by: Marcel Proust, Scott Moncrieff - translator
  • Narrated by: John Rowe
  • Length: 19 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

Swann's Way is Marcel Proust's literary masterpiece and the first part of the multivolume audiobook Remembrance of Things Past. In the opening volume, the narrator travels back in time to recall his childhood and to introduce the listener to Charles Swann, a wealthy friend of the family and celebrity in the Parisian social scene. He again travels back, this time to the youth of Charles Swann in the French town of Combray, to tell the story of the love affair that took place before his own birth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Feast of Greatness!

  • By Amazon Customer on 2018-03-22

A Feast of Greatness!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-03-22

I fell in love with Proust’s Swann’s Way when I was in Graduate School, decades ago. To return to Proust and listen to the work performed with such brilliance is indeed a sublime experience! New to audiobooks, I have to let go of the wish to reread the most wonderful passages, and just let myself be swept along by the genius of Proust’s consciousness, his startling, layered depths of description, his profound wit and insight in multiple fields, and his astonishing exploration of human longing in the inner realms of imagination and memory. Proust identified time as another dimension long before science! There are many such flashes of genius that I can appreciate much more now than I did long ago in my own temps perdu.

The performance of the late John Rowe is superb and does full justice to Proust. Each evening for all those hours, I found myself looking forward to hearing Rowe’s gentle, elegant voice with his nuanced timing and expression. It’s no mean feat to deliver some of Proust’s seemingly interminable sentences with such witty incisiveness. But Rowe becomes Proust, which adds another layer of enjoyment.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful