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Ingrid Morse

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 15
  • ratings
  • Becoming

  • Written by: Michelle Obama
  • Narrated by: Michelle Obama
  • Length: 19 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3,216
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,859
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,843

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites listeners into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her - from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work to her time spent at the world's most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it - in her own words and on her own terms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • inspiring

  • By sheena on 2019-02-18

Beautiful, informative and powerful.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-04-03

A stunning, touching, powerful view into the life of an incredibly humble First Lady. Her words are moving, as they paint gorgeous pictures, and inspire deep emotions. This book is about more than just her life and Barack’s presidency. It’s a testament to love, respect, humility, action, and acceptance.
Not only is the book beautiful but to hear Michelle narrate her words, in a measured, patient cadence brought me pleasure and peace.
Highly recommended, regardless of whether you follow politics.

  • Indian Horse

  • A Novel
  • Written by: Richard Wagamese
  • Narrated by: Jason Ryll
  • Length: 6 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 466
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 434
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 432

Saul Indian Horse is in critical condition. Sitting feeble in an alcoholism treatment facility, he is told that sharing his story will help relieve his agony. Though skeptical, he embarks on a heartbreaking journey from the present - and into the woods of Northern Ontario, where his life began in a snowy Ojibway camp. The tale that follows is one of great pain and great determination from Richard Wagamese, an author who "never seems to waste a shot" ( New York Times).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Heart wrenching and Humbling

  • By Anonymous User on 2018-11-11

✨ Incredible. Moving. Inspiring. ✨

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-02-04

I loved this book! Like many good books, it started slow, and built and built until I was completely in love and wished it wasn't over.

While it does cover the topic of residential schools and the atrocities that occurred, it is so much more than that. And if you love the sport of hockey, you'll imagine yourself flying across the ice on many occasions. There are moments of joy and pain that most people can identify with in some way.

The narrator felt detached at first, but as I approached the end of the book, I found that it actually suited the character very well.

Richard Wagamese has a gentle narrative that pulls you along with beauty and grace. Do yourself a favour and take this journey. ❤️

  • Starlight

  • Written by: Richard Wagamese
  • Narrated by: Wesley French
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 62

The final novel from Richard Wagamese, the best-selling and beloved author of Indian Horse and Medicine Walk, centres on an abused woman on the run who finds refuge on a farm owned by an Indigenous man with wounds of his own. A profoundly moving novel about the redemptive power of love, mercy, and compassion - and the land's ability to heal us. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Didn't want it to end - and it didn't

  • By Anonymous User on 2019-04-01

Beautiful and heart-wrenching

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-12-21

Oh, how I enjoyed this book. The sheer beauty of the words and images created, juxtaposed against the plain and simple dialogue of the characters made it a feast for the senses. I feel like I have been on a journey to the wild as a result. The world lost a great gem when Richard Wagamese passed away last year.

  • Girl, Wash Your Face

  • Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be
  • Written by: Rachel Hollis
  • Narrated by: Rachel Hollis
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,547
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,354
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,355

As the founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Rachel Hollis developed an immense online community by sharing tips for better living while fearlessly revealing the messiness of her own life. Now, in this challenging and inspiring new book, Rachel exposes the 20 lies and misconceptions that too often hold us back from living joyfully and productively.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Mostly for moms and people with religious beliefs

  • By Anonymous User on 2018-06-10

Not the right tone for me

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-09-13

I recently saw Rachel Hollis's documentary about her Rise event, and loved it. Loved the messages, the empowerment, and all of it. So I picked up this book. But is not striking the right chord with me. I'm only about 1/3 the way through, but I had to put it aside. For now, at least. I read/listen to a lot of self-help/empowerment/mindfulness/motivational books. But this one feels like I am being scolded a bit. I get that it is just her story and she is not professing to be an expert/psychologist/etc. But something about the tone is falling flat for me - which is partly me and partly the book. I just think she has a lack of awareness about how some of her messages can be received, and I find myself wishing some of it was backed by research the way so many other books are. So I accept that this is really popular for many people as a great inspirational tale, but so far not my cup of tea.
#Audible1

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Goodbye, Things

  • The New Japanese Minimalism
  • Written by: Fumio Sasaki, Eriko Sugita - translator
  • Narrated by: Keith Szarabajka
  • Length: 4 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 141
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 141

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo - he's just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn't absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A Regular Guys Experience

  • By PBJ on 2018-06-13

Preachy and eye-roll worthy, with some good tips

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-06-10

This book started off pretty well. There were certainly some great ideas and concepts around minimalism. I wouldn't call myself a minimalist but I'm well on my way, and rarely buy much anymore. I just want to discard some more stuff and looked for some mindset tips. I got a few, for sure.
And then it went downhill. He starts saying that minimalism can solve every issue you can think of. For example, how it can save relationships, because if you don't have things, you have more time to talk to each other, etc. Guess what? You can also choose to have those conversations! You don't need to empty your life of all possessions and joy in order to appreciate those around you. Granted, minimalism is one way some people could achieve that goal, but by the time you get the end of the book, he implies that every issue in the world can be solved by minimalism. He says he avoids colour and sticks with whites and beiges because of visual noise. He even says that after you reduce things from your life, you can even then remove the things that give you joy as well. Why? Basically, he digresses more and more toward the end and I couldn't wait for it to be over. I just think he ends up way out of his league. Granted he is just telling his story, and at the very end, he says you don't have to be a minimalist to experience these lessons. It's just one way to learn them. Very true and glad to hear him say it. But I was really put off by the second half of the book and all the preachiness. The narrator was good.