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Another brilliant book by Gladwell

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-10-19

This is the third book by Gladwell which I read. Brilliant and insightful.

A mentor once told me that understanding negates judgement.

This book is proof of this. From a racially charged encounter with a policeman, judges who seem biased, fraudsters who steal millions and millions from intelligent and experienced investors .. and many other examples.

All of these scenarios and more are discussed and explained with a deeper understanding and a more comprehensive perspective and suddenly I found my judgement set aside and a more reflective view of these stories emerged.

Not an easy read, some chapters were painful to read, just because I found it hard to see the the disproportionate amount of pain caused by a little misinterpretation and our unwillingness to rise above our bias.

Truly, understanding negates judgement.

A really "big" deal ...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-09-30

There is an idea in economics that consumers vote with their money. Every dollar you earn is a reward, a vote and affirmation that you have added value to someone else.

If you subscribe to this idea, then Mr. Schwarzman is someone we need to listen to and pay attention to. With $500 billion under management, Mr. Schwarzman and the company he co-founded, Blackstone, sure have a lot of "votes" and they created a lot of value.

The book shares a story of privilege, educated in Yale and Harvard, a successful career from day one and the right opportunities at the right time. Combined with a brilliant intellect, talent and ambition.

The result is phenomenal BIG success.

The reader needs a basic understanding of economics and finance to follow some of the deals Mr. Schwarzman describes. With that foundation and an interest in the subject, you will find the book informative and interesting.

Beyond sharing his knowledge, Mr. Schwarzman shares his wisdom.

Enjoyed it and learned from it. Recommend read.

Brilliant!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-09-20

This is the third book I read by Malcolm Gladwell (Blink, Outliers).

One word describes the man .. BRILLIANT!

In this book he describes how fashion, technology, copy cat behavior and epedemics spread - all in the same fashion.

He talks about the influential few who affect the rest of us, about the power of context and about stickiness (yes stickiness).

He talks about how graffiti in a train or a broken window can have huge ramifications in the not so distant future and about how influencers and word of mouth will have an increasingly more powerful role as we move further and further into the information age.

An enjoyable, engaging and thought provoking book. Highly recommend.

His newest book (Talking to Strangers) is already in my library and I plan to read it soon.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A fine book ...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-08-19

One key message, eat more starch in its natural state!

It didn't take the whole book to get this across to me, but the other material in the book as (while not new) relevant, informative and interesting.

Glad I read it, would not read a 2nd book on this same topic though.

I do plan to implement the suggestions in the book into practice.

A profoundly touching book ...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-08-10

A profound and deeply touching book.

Sincere, humane and genuine.

Not easy to listen to. Many segments of the book were painful and sad to listen to.

Yet somehow in the midst of the suffering the therapist is sharing I felt a deeper insight into the human condition. I felt awakened from the state of numbness we sometimes escape to. I felt compassion, a lack of judgement and a deeper understanding.

Well worth the time.

Good Read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-06-24

interesting, a bit long winded, applicable, relevant. Glad I listened, but I would not re-listen a second time.

So / So

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-06-07

I really wanted to like this book.

Some (not much) original thought. The idea of measuring financial health through cashflow from portfolio income is interesting. The comments about financial education were interesting. The distinction between assets and liabilities (based on the author's criteria) is interesting ...

Some generalities and lack of substance. For example (using my words), if you don't have your own money's to invest, use other people's money. High risk investments sometimes pay off. It's a great idea to buy low and sell high. Come on!

All in all, not a total waste of time, but not a masterpiece either.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

Essential Business Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-06-04

I just finished "Never Split the Difference" and wanted to revisit "Getting to Yes" to compare and contrast the two books.

Bottom line, you need to read both books and apply the knowledge to the situation you are facing. The former is relevant
when negotiating with someone who doesn't share your value system. The latter is relevant when negotiating with someone who shares your principles and fundamentals.

Both books are essential business reading.

Brilliant!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-05-29

What a great book.

The head negotiator of the FBI shares his wisdom and insights into how to drive negotiations. Beyond conventional notions of win/win, beyond assumptions of reasonableness, beyond "yes".

Brilliant book, I thoroughly enjoyed it and will review again (and again). Two enthusiastic thumbs up.

Profound Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-05-24

A profound book which discusses Adlerian Psychology. I learned new concepts such as Life Tasks, Ernest Living and Dancing in the Here and Now.

I agreed and recognized some of the ideas as true - intuitively, while disagreeing with others - vehemently.

At no time did the book leave me in a state of neutral.

Not an easy read. Substantive and weighty, it will appeal to readers with an interest in psychology and philosophy.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful