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Kailey

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Transported into another life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-10-26

Before I started this book, I was expecting a more dry academic read, but what I got was a fully immersive book for the ages. I was shocked at the reality of Tara’s life in her Mormon family, the stark difference of it from my imagining of North American society was a griping reminder of my own ignorance. This book somehow managed to be a charged plot driven narrative and a scholarly text, worthy of its own place in university syllabi. I was transported into Tara’s life in Idaho and fully understood her rational as she struggled with themes of family loyalty, abuse, education, faith, and trust in herself. I don’t think I have ever read a memoir that I didn’t want to put down before. At the same time, it reminds me of something I might read in perhaps one of my women’s studies courses, an English course or even a religions course.

4 people found this helpful

Insightful. Thrilling. Inspiring. Funny.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-10-05

It is very rare that I find a book that has gripping story line while simultaneously reflecting SOOO beautifully on the state of the modern world. April May is a wonderfully developed character, flawed but always aspiring to do good and be good—much like the Humanity April believes to be true. This is a future classic. A modern rebuttal to Lord of the Flies, with the prose and excitement of Gatsby plus a sci-fi twist. This is a book for the ages.

Royal version of 50 shades of gray

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-07-17

The performances were lovely. But the plot was lacking quite a bit. It reads like a work of fan fiction rather than a full fledged novel. There was a lot of super corny dialogue and euphemisms to get through especially when it came to Josh. Adeline acted and thought like a petulant child, infatuated with a guy that she’d only known for a few days and was unable to think at the mental level for a woman of 30. Palace life and affairs was quite interesting but still fell to tropey. This was more so a book revolving around sex, which was poorly written btw, rather than a romantic drama set in the English monarchy. A large section of plot was saved for the last few chapters, almost like the author forgot about them until last minute and lazily slipped them in there.