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Exanime

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super interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-04-19

Amazing look into how con artists work and how people simply believe what they want to believe

I tend to love journalist written books, they are often very well written.... this book is no exception

A Classic with good reason

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-04-15

This book was amazing... great story, well developed characters, etc. The story itself is well fleshed out and even though it belongs in a world I would barely recognize it does not feel alien to me.

The story narrative is a bit simplistic as old books tend to be, no jump in times, no dual perspectives, etc... but this is not a criticism, just a comment for those looking at a bit of an insight

Anthony Heald (the narrator of this audiobook) is a TREASURE... what an amazing performance!... I will probably end up listening to any book he narrates regardless of genre... he is THAT GOOD!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

It's a classic for a reason!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-06-07

Great book... I've always wanted to read it but was afraid of how massive it was...

It's a great story full of rich details and a very charming narrative... the dialog between the characters is often very very charming in a sailor-talk sort of way.

I must say thought that the narration by Anthony Heald is a MASTERPIECE... this is by far the best narration of an audiobook I have every heard... different and recognizable voices per character, perfect cadence, absolutely captures the spirit of the book. Kudos to you sir!

Excellent intro... Clear, concise and entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-05-09

These lectures were excellent, this is my second from the Great Courses and I see no reason to stop.

This one in particular was well explained, to the point and very informative. If I had to choose something to complain it would be that, at times, Professor Taylor seemed unable to stay neutral and leaned over to the right a bit much.

All in all, an excellent product and well worth the time investment

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Fantastic program and very entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-04-24

if "entertaining" is an acceptable word for a long story of horror. the pace of the lecture is fantastic, i couldn't stop listening

Fantastic voyage

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-04-11

This book may be old but it is still as relevant and entertaining as the year it was written.

Maybe back in the 70's

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-03-21

This book may have been a sensation back in the 70's but by today's standards it's just OK. The entire book is based on work by Dr. Haim Ginott (which as far as I can see, was completely ripped off by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish after attending his workshops) and can be summarized as follows:

* Never deny or ignore a child's feelings
* Only behavior is treated as unacceptable, not the child
* Depersonalize negative interactions by mentioning only the problem. "I see a messy room."
* Attach rules to things, e.g., "Little sisters are not for hitting."
* Dependence breeds hostility, let children do for themselves what they can
* Children need to learn to choose, but within the safety of limits.
* Limit criticism to a specific event—don't say "never", "always", as in: "You never listen," "You always manage to spill things"
* Refrain from using words that you would not want the child to repeat
* Ignore irrelevant behavior

The above advice by Dr. Ginott is sound, but in this book they do not explain the reasons why this works, they simply tell you what to do and spend the entire book selling their approach with anecdotal stories that border on the ridiculous...

Example:
Wrong way
Dad "Johnny, clean your room!!!, it's a mess you are a filthy animal, you'll never learn, you'll always be a failure, I should give you a good smack" (I'm not kidding, the "wrong way" examples are this much over the top
Kid "I hate you!"

Right way
Dad "I see a messy room"
Kid "I'll clean it up right away daddy... I love you so much... I will also do my homework and call grandma before saying my prayers and going to be an hour early" (again, not kidding, as soon as you apply the "right way" kids suddenly transform into magical unicorns

To top it all, this particular version of the book is about half full with the old 70's book and the last 6 chapters are just letters from parents telling these authors how amazing they are and how they saved the world (it felt like a giant ego stroke)... I feel everybody would be far better served by just reading Dr. Ginott's original work "Between Parent and Child (1965, Macmillan)"

31 of 31 people found this review helpful

Hugely entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-02-27

If you are a geek in your 30s or 40s this is the book for you... I also share the story with my kids and they loved it even though they couldn't get all the references

Wil Wheaton did an amazing job with this story... It was a pleasant experience from cover to cover (or whatever the equivalent of that expression is for an audiobook)

Best Science Book I have ever read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-02-12

This was fantastic in all ways... interesting, well organized, well read and performed, challenging, informative, etc

I have nothing but good things to say about this amazing body of knowledge

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

I'm surprised this book has such great reviews

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2017-12-15

I'm a casual reader of this genre and found very little original content here. All the principles boil down to common sense with little advice on actual application. The entire book revolves around: identify issues, solve them, voila! it wasn't that hard was it?!

At no point in this book I was persuaded that Dalio's principles actually made his company successful and not simply the fact that he made good calls on the market and made a ton of money... which by the way Dalio seems to make clear is the only definition of greatness that anyone cares about... money.

Dalio also seems completely oblivious to his privileged position and seems to assume everyone has the option to consult 4 Chief of Staff Physicians across the country when validating a medical diagnosis... easy right? why doesn't everyone do it? He often repeats how he started from "nothing"; his version of nothing being married rich with Harvard degree in tow

The biography part of the book is pretty much a long backdoor bragging narrative; in fairness, Dalio warns about it.
The life principles are just common sense with no original take nor any practical approach.
The work principles are the same life principles (literally) but from a work angle. Useful of course if you run your own Fortune 500 company because if you are just an employee (even a high level one) you will have no chance to even try these (almost all revolve around hiring and firing people anyway)

Finally, and perhaps in an effort to sound original, Dalio comes up with his own terms for ideas that already exist but as the book progresses he essentially betrays them. "Radical Transparency" ends up being not even "total transparency", just basically a tad more transparent than other companies?... "Radical open mindness" sure, accept other more "believable" (his word for "credible") people no matter what... unless you are the owner because principle 11 says "always hold the last word".

Anyway, there are better, more practical and evidence based books out there... skip this one.

59 of 68 people found this review helpful