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Great book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-04-16

Read this after reading the writer’s other novel, Circe. A tale of forbidden love and loss, but this time with a male-male couple, which is refreshing. The first bit is a little slow, but you realize that it has its place in building their story together. By the end you’ll cry over how beautiful their relationship was.

An amazing story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-04-07

This book was awesome. Such a magical way of description, with really solid character development. I would re read this in a heartbeat.

Climate change through a social policy lens

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-04-03

Naomi Klein does a great job expressing secondary factors associated with climate change, indigenous rights, socialist policies like universal basic income, universal education and healthcare. Thought the section on indigenous rights was particularly well done. The first section of the book was a little difficult to get through as it revolves around scare tactic and anecdotes to punctuate the need for climate action, sort of easy to see through. Would rather have had a more detailed science or even economic approach to discussing the need for climate action. All in all a great listen if you’re interested in learning about climate change through a social policy lens, but if you’re looking for a scientific discussion probably best served elsewhere.

1 person found this helpful

Could have used a bit more of a political center-lean

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-03-13

Alex Epstein does a good job of explaining why, through a human centric lens, fossil fuels should be a part of our energy mix and the positive impact they have had so far on human progress.
I think he misses the mark in a few ways:
1. He argues himself around hydro and nuclear as “green” fuels. Hydro and nuclear should both play a significant role in decarbonization.
2. He places essentially all human progress on the back of fossil fuels. Yes they played a large role in giving us capacity, but there are plenty other things you could point at in a similar light.
3. Shifts the lens to “human centric” because it suits the argument well and spends little to no time talking about “impact centric” ideals.


All in all, a well explained moral argument for fossil fuels, but could have used a bit more lean to political center to be more holistic.

Really well done summary of black oppression in America

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2019-02-08

Gives a great chronological view of how mass incarceration has unfolded. Hammers on the severity of the issue with a good mix of quantitative and qualitative reasoning. I feel like I understand and have a better appreciation for racism at a policy/legal level.