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H. Scott Elliott

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  • 1
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  • David Copperfield

  • Written by: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Richard Armitage
  • Length: 36 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128

Between his work on the 2014 Audible Audiobook of the Year, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark: A Novel, and his performance of Classic Love Poems, narrator Richard Armitage ( The Hobbit, Hannibal) has quickly become a listener favorite. Now, in this defining performance of Charles Dickens' classic David Copperfield, Armitage lends his unique voice and interpretation, truly inhabiting each character and bringing real energy to the life of one of Dickens' most famous characters.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A classic worth savouring

  • By Tee on 2018-08-18

Bringing a classic to life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-11-22

Richard Armitage does a masterful job of breathing life into this nearly 200 year old tale. Creating a separate voice for each character within the story helps the listener build an image of the entire ensemble. The pacing is spot-on, and spoken with such emotion that you cheer for Copperfield's victories or weep for his heartbreaking loses.

A small technical note: there are times throughout the recording when you can tell that Armitage re-recorded a few passages of the book as it "sounds" different. But those are few and far apart to be merely a minor distraction.

  • Radical Candor

  • Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity
  • Written by: Kim Scott
  • Narrated by: Kim Scott
  • Length: 9 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 134
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133

From the time we learn to speak, we're told that if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all. When you become a manager, it’s your job to say it--and your obligation. Author Kim Scott was an executive at Google and then at Apple, where she developed a class on how to be a good boss. She has earned growing fame in recent years with her vital new approach to effective management, Radical Candor. Radical Candor is a simple idea: to be a good boss, you have to Care Personally at the same time that you Challenge Directly.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Kim Scott delivered a great Audible experience

  • By Don B. on 2019-06-21

Great & straightforward advice on managing people

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2018-01-15

While many claim that Kim Scott's ideas laid out her book are neither new nor revolutionary, she does a great job of packaging up honest and straightforward guidance to managing people. Regardless if you're a relatively new manager, or have been managing people for several years, Scott corrals best practices and suggestions in an easy-to-understand book that will be helpful to almost anyone.

The book is in two main parts:
Part 1 outlines the "theory" of radical candor and why you should subscribe to this philosophy.
Part 2 gives several step-by-step suggestions on how to implement radical candor into your management style.

Within those two parts, Scott touches on a lot of the common topics you would expect:
1. Giving valuable feedback -- both praise and criticism
2. Valuing the rock-stable workers just as much as the ambitious workers (rock stars versus super stars)
3. Classifying your meetings into distinct types, and the purposes of each
4. Growing your team and ensuring you cater career advice for your team members.

The book was an enjoyable listen -- it was fantastic balance of ideas/concepts with numerous stories from Scott's work experience. However, Scott's vocal performance was slightly monotonous. It's obvious she is passionate about the topic and does well mixing typical business vocabulary with some honestly blunt "earthy language," but she would do well changing the pitch and speed of voice while reading the text. It makes a significant difference when an experienced voice actor reads the text.

  • The Speed of Trust

  • The One Thing that Changes Everything
  • Written by: Stephen M. R. Covey
  • Narrated by: Stephen M. R. Covey
  • Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29

For business leaders and public figures in any arena, The Speed of Trust offers an unprecedented and eminently practical look at exactly how trust functions in our every transaction and relationship - from the most personal to the broadest, most indirect interaction - and how to establish trust immediately so that you and your organization can forego the time - killing, bureaucratic check - and - balance processes so often deployed in lieu of actual trust.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Read it

  • By Scott on 2018-01-27

Helpful information, but no real insights

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 2017-12-14

My executive team is handing out this book as a resource to all directors and up in my company. Just so that I can see what ethos they claim to be following, I decided to give this book a try. I was never a fan of his fathers "7 habits of highly effective people" and this one falls short of that book unfortunately.

Steven M.R. Covey actually recorded this audio book -- with the rare and somewhat odd interjections of Rebecca Merrrill. While he doesn't exactly have a monotone voice, Covey's deliver is mostly flat and hard to listen to for any prolonged period of time. Added to the fact that the recorded material "skips" in several places throughout the book, this has the feel of a rather immature audio book.

To be honest, you can get by on a someone's summary of this book on the concepts within as reading/listening to the book in its entirety doesn't provide any additional insights as Covey tends to be rather repetitive. I would have given up on the book long ago if it wasn't for the fact that my company's CEO has claimed that he wants our company to live up to the values within this book (and as an aside: 3 months after laying out this game plan to senior management, there aren't any signs that they are).

And just a few notes about the examples given throughout this book (granted, the book was written over 10 years ago and the hindsight of time can point out some obvious mistakes):

1. Tiger Woods was trotted out as a example in the "self-trust" and how he was working at always bettering himself (I guess the big sexual addiction scandals somewhat got in the way).

2. Nokia was an example that was a company that constantly worked at reinvented itself to stay relevant and a world power in the telecommunication industry (and now all but disappeared into the huge Microsoft beast).

3. Joe Paterno and the Penn Stat football team was an organization demonstrated qualities that exemplified a great example of a trusted organization (except for the small problem of 15 years of sexual abuse of several vulnerable boys).

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