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Jordanetics

A Journey into the Mind of Humanity's Greatest Thinker
Written by: Vox Day
Narrated by: Thomas Landon
Length: 7 hrs and 31 mins
5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)
Price: CDN$ 25.00
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Publisher's Summary

Jordan Peterson is believed by many to be the greatest thinker that humanity has ever known. He is Father Figure, Philosopher-King, and Prophet to the millions of young men who are his most fervent fans and followers. He is the central figure of the Intellectual Dark Web, an academic celebrity, and an unparalleled media phenomenon who has shattered all conceptions of what it means to be modern celebrity in the Internet Age. 

He has, by his own admission, thought thoughts that no man has ever thought before. He has dared to dream dreams that no man has ever dreamed before. 

Of course, Jordan Peterson also happens to be a narcissist, a charlatan, and an intellectual con man who doesn't even bother to teach the subjects upon which he lectures. He is a defender of free speech who silences other speakers, a fearless free-thinker who never hesitates to run away from debates, difficult questions, and controversial issues, a philosopher who rejects the conventional definition of truth, and a learned professor who has failed to read most of the great classics of the Western canon. He is, in short, a shameless and unrepentant fraud who lacks even a modicum of intellectual integrity. 

But is Jordan Peterson more than a mere fraud? Is he something more sinister, more unbalanced, and even more dangerous? In Jordanetics: A Journey into the Mind of Humanity's Greatest Thinker, political philosopher Vox Day delves deeply into the core philosophy that Jordan Peterson advocates in both his written works and his video lectures. In doing so, Day methodically builds a shocking case that will convince even the most skeptical Jordan Peterson supporter to reconsider both the man and his teachings.

©2018 Vox Day (P)2019 Vox Day

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  • Tanicia Workman
  • Delta Junction, ALASKA, United States
  • 2019-04-15

great book

loved the book, loved the quotes and using them in context. I've read the 12 rules for life and this book easily explains why so much of that one confused me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Tom Poleski
  • Vancouver, Canada
  • 2019-03-28

Distasteful character assassination.

There's some paragraphs there where he nails Peterson pretty good but the majority of it can be easily countered and didn't change my opinion of the man as being noble and good overall. I found the parts about comparisons with the occult to be the most interesting part of the book, the rest I slogged through and found very distasteful. Day's own "12 rules" at the very end of the book are wise and a good alternative to Pererson's.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Anthony V
  • 2019-02-21

Pay credit for Narrator to read YouTube Comments.

If you are going to try and kill the king, you had best not miss. Vox Day misses (badly) and comes off as an insufferable twit in the process. Bombastic, overwrought, trite, churlish. Sad. About 10% of what the author notes are accurate observations where Peterson could improve his content or delivery. Unfortunately, they are buried in Bombast and manure of the remaining 90%. The narrator does a decent job of making it interesting.

Don't take my word for it:
Summary of final chapter 23 (at 6:47:35 in the book): "He wants to serve the tripartite role of messiah, savior, and pope ... Jordan Peterson is Crazy and Evil..."

The content reads like a deposition in which the FBI tries to catch someone on perjury. The focus is on process violations vs the subtext of the message. (for those not aware, when speaking with the FBI ANY statement you make, whether material to the case or not must be factual or you ARE guilty of making a false statement... for example, look up how they got Martha Stewart, it was in the details of the false statement, not securities fraud). That is what hearing this feels like.

Also, in the forward, Yiannopolis palters by leaving out the context of what Peterson said. The context was focusing on the comparison of Yianopolis to Hitler, which Peterson took umbrage with. Peterson was not calling Yianopolis a White supremacist, although the transcript they read could be construed to sound that way because they stop and leave out the part where Peterson takes umbrage with the comparison.

The ad hominem is strong in this one as well. Vox Day (real name Theodore Robert Beale) takes a heavy-handed approach, pointing out Peterson's discussions on his family's history with depression. Beale uses this as the basis to discredit Peterson's work out of the gate (mental illness = unsound arguments and fraudulent positions.) Yet, if Beale applies this own standard to himself, his assessment of Peterson would be tainted by the fact that Beale's father is a convicted felon who was found guilty of a multimillion-dollar tax fraud scheme and who subsequently threatened the life of a federal judge. The fact that Beale led with this ad hominem (which could also be said to apply to Beale and his family). was cause for concern... but I soldiered on. I really wanted to hear what Beale had to say because I value contrary points as they help me to see things from a different point of view.

At least 90 minutes of this audiobook is the narrator (somewhat skillfully yet tediously) reading youtube comments. Unnecessary and pedantic. It really was starting to border on childish at this point.

What is most frustrating about the premise of this book is the fact that Beale takes quotes from Peterson that he has made over time and takes them as a snapshot in time. An example that stands out to me is where he takes a quote Peterson made at age 14 about becoming Prime Minister of Canada and contrasts that with a statement made decades later about how he didn't really have an interest in politics. He uses this to accuse Peterson of being a liar and charlatan. I would ask Beale, is no one is allowed to change their mind over time based on new facts or life experiences? Sad. Waste of a credit.

5 of 15 people found this review helpful