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Publisher's Summary

Moneyball is a quest for something as elusive as the Holy Grail, something that money apparently can't buy: the secret of success in baseball. The logical places to look would be the giant offices of major league teams and the dugouts. But the real jackpot is a cache of numbers collected over the years by a strange brotherhood of amateur baseball enthusiasts: software engineers, statisticians, Wall Street analysts, lawyers, and physics professors.

In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Lewis shows us how and why the new baseball knowledge works. He also sets up a sly and hilarious morality tale: Big Money, like Goliath, is always supposed to win.... How can we not cheer for David?

©2004 Michael Lewis (P)2012 Audible Ltd

What the critics say

"Lewis has hit another one out of the park... You need know absolutely nothing about baseball to appreciate the wit, snap, economy and incisiveness of [Lewis'] thoughts about it." (The New York Times)
"I understood about one in four words of Moneybal, and it's still the best and most engrossing sports book I've read for years. If you know anyting about baseball, you will enjoy it four times as much as I did, which means that you might explode." (Nick Hornby)
"Engaging, informative and deliciously contrarian." ( Washington Post)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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This book is not about baseball!

This book is not about baseball. The stories show deep commonalities with nearly every facet of contemporary life well outside of sports. There is not a single topic that would not benefit from the lessons, insight, and wisdom that the heroes of these accounts display.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Not an Underdog story.

completely different from the movie. a little hard to follow with the stat calculations. overall a great listen though.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Great even if you don't know baseball

An engaging exploration of the difference between conventional wisdom and a new perspective. It will encourage you to look at familiar problems in new ways.

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An inspiration to challenge mental models

I don't think I've ever sat through a professional baseball game, but I had no problem listening to Scott Brick narrate this excellent book.

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  • A Kirk
  • 2018-09-24

So you aren't a baseball fan?

It's OK, neither am I. I wouldn't know a shortstop from a triple play. Actually that's not quite true, I do now courtesy of this book, but it doesn't matter because Michael Lewis is a (perhaps THE) master of telling a story on a specific subject and making it about a whole range of issues related to that subject. You won't even notice that you've left the main road for a scenic detour through (for example) one player's formative years, his thoughts and hopes and aspirations and experiences, until you're suddenly back on topic and cruising through the main story again. You never lose sight of the main road, but the detours let you see it in context.

As is often the case he looks into the technology of his subject (without ever making it dry), the schools of thought surrounding it, both the conventional ones and the heretical ones... and most of all the people. Just as you don't need to be a finance expert (or even be particularly interested in finance as such) to appreciate The Big Short, you don't need to be a baseball fan to appreciate this story.

The story is about overcoming odds. About developing new ways of thinking to achieve something when conventional wisdom says you can't. About finding value in skills and people where the world says that the value doesn't exist. And, of course, about the people who come up with those ideas, the people who are affected by the ideas, and the people who push back against them.

As with many of Lewis' books you'll meet an interesting array of diverse characters who come to life through the words Lewis uses, and the stories he tells about them.

Scott Brick does an excellent job of bringing the story to life; he has a good voice, is easy to listen to, and adopts just the right pace to keep the listener engaged.

I really couldn't tell you how many times I've listened to this book since I bought it, save to say that I know the last time I listened to it won't be the last time that I listen to it.