Get a free audiobook

CDN$ 14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Featuring his famous literary detective Atticus Pund and Susan Ryeland, hero of the worldwide best seller Magpie Murders, a brilliantly complex literary thriller with echoes of Agatha Christie from New York Times best-selling author Anthony Horowitz.

Retired publisher Susan Ryeland is living the good life. She is running a small hotel on a Greek island with her long-term boyfriend Andreas. It should be everything she's always wanted. But is it? She's exhausted with the responsibilities of making everything work on an island where nothing ever does, and truth be told she's beginning to miss London. 

And then the Trehearnes come to stay. The strange and mysterious story they tell, about an unfortunate murder that took place on the same day and in the same hotel in which their daughter was married - a picturesque inn on the Suffolk coast named Farlingaye Halle - fascinates Susan and piques her editor’s instincts. 

One of her former writers, the late Alan Conway, author of the fictional Magpie Murders, knew the murder victim - an advertising executive named Frank Parris - and once visited Farlingaye Hall. Conway based the third book in his detective series, Atticus Pund Takes the Cake, on that very crime. 

The Trehearnes' daughter, Cecily, read Conway’s mystery and believed the book proves that the man convicted of Parris’s murder - a Romanian immigrant who was the hotel’s handyman - is innocent. When the Trehearnes reveal that Cecily is now missing, Susan knows that she must return to England and find out what really happened. 

Brilliantly clever, relentlessly suspenseful, full of twists that will keep listeners guessing with each revelation and clue, Moonflower Murders is a deviously dark take on vintage English crime fiction from one of its greatest masterminds, Anthony Horowitz.

©2020 Anthony Horowitz (P)2020 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about Moonflower Murders

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    19
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    25
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    16
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

What did I just read?

Despite feeling speechless in the moments immediately after finishing this book, I also feel compelled to write this review while I'm still experiencing the overwhelming feeling that I need to stand up and clap. Where to even begin... This book is a monumental achievement worthy of all of the Agatha Christie comparisons. Intelligently written and constructed, to say the least, this is something different. If you liked the crucial minutiae dripping from the pages of They Do it With Mirrors and the layer-upon-layer style of the 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle, then buckle up for Moonflower Murders.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Intricate and interesting. and very clever

I liked the idea with two mysteries stories connected in one book. it worked well and was enhanced by excellent narration by both the narrators

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Story within a story!

This was wonderful entertainment. Never lags, always keeps you guessing with literary clues,. Just superb entertainmentf while knitting socks for my grandson. Kept knitting so I could keep listening to resolution of next plot twist/turn!

3 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 2020-11-13

Amazing mystery!

Oh my goodness! I have been looking forward to diving into this book for over a year when Anthony Horowitz first announced it's conception. I can honestly say that I was not expecting the end. They way Horowitz hinted at the identity of the killer from the beginning of the story was done in such a way that it made me think "Oh, well they're obviously not the killer then." I was up until the early hours of the morning trying to finish it in one go and audibly exclaimed my surprise on more than one occasion. Horowitz's use of telling a story within a story has always fascinated me, and in this instance, it gave me the false sense of confidence that I could solve the mystery before finishing the book. While that obviously was not the case, it did provide me with tips on how to successfully write a mystery that keeps its readers on the edge of their seats.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Winsome
  • 2020-11-18

Keep a note pad handy

Whoa -- you might need to write down the names of all the characters in this very complex story-within-a-story. Suggest creating two side-by-side columns with the names of Story 1 characters in the first column and the names of Story 2 characters in the second column. As the book progresses, you may be able to draw connecting lines to associate a character in one story with a character in the other, but be sure to draw in pencil! A very cleverly plotted mystery (even more so than Magpie Murders), and I enjoyed it very much. Excellent narration, too, but I might tackle it again in hard copy so that I can more closely follow all the plot twists and turns. This one will keep you guessing, and after all, isn't that just what we want in a mystery?

13 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Emma
  • 2020-11-15

Fantastic!

I loved The Magpie Murders, which I'd found in a secondhand bookshop and then purchased on Audible after giving the book to a friend. When I heard a second book was coming, I preordered on Audible immediately. When you love a first book so much, a sequel sometimes makes you nervous that it won't live up to high expectations. Not so with Moonflower Murders. Although the structure of the book was slightly different (we hear Conway's novel *after* meeting the cast through Susan's perspective this time), it adds an extra puzzle for the reader/listener which I found to be very fun. As with the first book, the narrators are engaging and both parts are very well acted. If you love stories in the style of Agatha Christie, you'll absolutely love these books. I can't wait for the next one! And in the meantime, I'll listen over and over!

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • roseanne woerner
  • 2020-11-26

THOUGHT IT WOULD NEVER END

If you loved the throaty voice of Samantha Bond in Magpie Murders, those crisply uttered syllables, the expressive delivery, you'll be unhappy with Leslie Manville's performance in Moonflower. While Ms. Manville does a perfectly fine job, she's soft spoken. She didn't come across as the strong and independent character she was supposed to portray. During her portion, I imagined a retiring older woman instead of a fearless thirty something with a big need for excitement and adventure.
As with Magpie, there was a story in a story. While I appreciated the switch in narrators, it was hard to keep the characters straight. In Magpie, there was a brief interlude before the second story began, so it was much easier to learn the two separate casts.
In Moonflower, the reader is introduced to the main story, and then the fictional tale is introduced as the character names swim - Who was that? Was he the friend or the husband? I thought he was in the other story, etc.
The plot is too contrived and not just the fact that a former editor living in Crete is sought out to investigate a disappearance. That situation is unbelievable, but the fact Susan Ryeland has the ability to ferret out this particular murder, and the sequence of events that follow so quickly is unrealistic. The cause and effect didn't work for me.
Did I care Susan Ryeland wasn't happy in Crete? Not so much. Her love life had little to do with the story. Her character wasn't especially likable either. Plus, the fact that she was so wishy-washy about her own situation made her ability to untangle the roadmap from victim to killer - not once but twice, doubtful.
Were the other character's agenda's unrealistic? Absolutely. Almost every one of them seemed to have a lust for someone else's blood.
Getting through this book was hard work. I did it. Sadly, I have to give it a thumbs down.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Linda
  • 2020-11-13

I want the next one now!

Though a little “twisty turny“ thoroughly engaging. You do have to pay a bit more attention than one might ordinarily pay it is worth it. Maybe the next one will be a book within a book within a book. Characters well drawn, plot complicated but engaging, scenes brought to life with creation of atmosphere rather than boring descriptions. Loved it!

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • alexis roizen
  • 2020-11-15

Another good one! But where’s Susan?

Horowitz delivers again. I binged this book in the first 3 days of release and it didn’t disappoint. My only annoyance was that Susan had a different narrator from Magpie Murders. Samantha Bond has such district texture in her voice that I missed her throughout Moonflower. But that’s my only grievance. A wonderful book for fall corona lock down.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • CR
  • 2020-11-25

Slightly disappointing

I loved the first book in this series so I may have come to this one with my expectations too high. The book within a book format didn’t work quite as well this time unfortunately. It felt disjointed, the two stories having very little to do with one another. That was perhaps the point, but it still felt off to me, and while the “book” mystery was nicely woven the modern day mystery felt somehow lacking. It was almost too self aware and just because you point out that you’re doing something cliched or improbable doesn’t necessarily make it feel any less so. At the end of the day I just didn’t buy the solution, which was a weird feeling, and the easy way everyone accepted supposition as fact with no evidence was, in a modern setting, a bit surreal.

Also, and I’ll keep this vague to avoid spoilers, there is a certain thing that happens with the main protagonist and her love interest in both the first book and this book. It works once, but repeatedly and totally out of the blue it starts to feel pretty contrived. I have this weird suspicion that something isn’t right about Andreas, but I’m not sure if I’m actually picking up on something or just tripping over a kind of tacked on love story. Well, time will tell because I will definitely read more in this series. This book may not have been as good as the first but it was not a bad book, the author is very talented and I look forward to seeing what future installments may bring.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jeff M.
  • 2020-11-13

Just spectacular! As usual!

Anthony Horowitz is quite probably the best writer of whodunnits currently working. I eagerly await each of his new books being released!

His plots are excellent, the prose is quite enjoyable, and the characters are well fleshed-out.

And once again, we are not let down. The framed-story of a murder mystery novel set within and against the backdrop of a separate but related murder mystery makes for an enjoyable ride.

The narrators do a wonderful job with the book as well.


4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Linda
  • 2020-11-21

Layer upon Layer

I have read most of Anthony Horowitz novels and enjoyed them. The Moonflower Murders was less satisfying for two reasons:
First) it contains a novella within the main novel. This novella is to illustrate how the characters in one book were actually leads to the solution of the main mystery. However, the novella distracted me from the main story, so much so that I almost forgot what the main mystery was about; and Secondly) the final solution to the main mystery was so complicated, layer upon layer of clues and misleading clues, that it detracted from the enjoyment of finally learning who the villain was. The narrators were fine, though I preferred the male voice to the female one. Perhaps this book is better to read, than to listen to.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Diane M. Gregson
  • 2020-12-27

Disappointing and Basically Boring

I am amazed that Horowitz who created "Foyle's War" (one of my favorite TV series), writes novels with such a snide and mean-spirited mood.

There is not a likable or relatable character in this book. The "love" story line between the "main" character and her boyfriend/fiance is contrived and painful to read. Their dialogue seems lifted from a second rate romance novel. Horowitz seems bitter about happy relationships and gleefully and maliciously destroys every couple in the book.

The "duo mysteries" are not that interesting or riveting. There is a lot of silly soul searching and breast beating.
More caricature than characters.

My main complaint is that Horowitz is disparaging about the mystery genre. Constantly, he inserts little barbs belittling mystery and mystery writing. I get a sense of rancorous man smirking at readers for buying his tripe.

I will not be tempted to read Mr. Horowitz again.

2 people found this helpful