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My Man Jeeves and Right Ho, Jeeves

Written by: P.G. Wodehouse
Narrated by: Calvin Thais
Series: Jeeves, Book 1, 6
Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Presenting My Man Jeeves and Right Ho, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse. These classics are part of the P. G. Wodehouse Collection and The Great Books Series by Golding Books.

Jeeves presents the ideal image of the gentleman, being highly competent, dignified, and respectful. Incredibly knowledgeable about topics ranging from horse racing to history, Jeeves has an encyclopedic knowledge of literature and academic subjects. 

He frequently quotes from Shakespeare and the romantic poets. Well-informed about members of the British aristocracy thanks to the club book of the Junior Ganymede Club, he also seems to have a considerable number of useful connections among various servants. Jeeves uses his knowledge and connections to solve problems inconspicuously. 

About the author: Pelham Grenville Wodehouse was born in Guildford, Surrey, in 1881. His father Henry Ernest Wodehouse was a magistrate resident in the British colony of Hong Kong, and his mother Eleanor (née Deane) was the daughter of the schoolmaster and author Reverend John Bathurst Deane. His mother was visiting her sister when Wodehouse was born prematurely, and after his baptism (and being named after his godfather Lieutenant Colonel Pelham George von Donop - yet his nickname came to be “Plum”) the two sailed for Hong Kong. 

Raised by a Chinese nurse along with his elder brothers Peveril and Armine, the siblings returned to England when Wodehouse was two and were cared for by an English nanny in a house adjoining that of Eleanor’s parents’ (a then-normal arrangement for colony families). 

Whatever the effect of the distance, Wodehouse developed a love for reading and dreaming up stories and described his childhood as a happy one. He attended Malvern House Preparatory School in Kent, as his father planned for him to have a career in the Royal Navy, but poor eyesight prevented him from pursuing this (he later parodied Malvern House’s austerity by having character Bertie Wooster describe his school as a “penitentiary”). 

In 1894 he followed brother Armine to Dulwich College, and liked the camaraderie there, becoming editor of the school magazine, The Alleynian, and excelling in various sports as well as singing. His father’s pension lost value (it fell against the pound, since it was paid in rupees), and, rather than follow Armine to Oxford, Wodehouse was unhappily employed in a junior position at the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in London. 

He would write at the end of each working day, and during his two years at the bank, he had 80 pieces published in nine magazines, also writing for The Globe newspaper’s popular “By the Way” column. 

With the publishing of his first novel The Pothunters (1902), Wodehouse resigned from the bank to write full-time. Among his considerable literary output, his most enduring and beloved characters include the witty monocle-sporting Psmith, idle rich Londoner Bertie Wooster, and his highly capable valet Jeeves, the amiable if forgetful Threepwood family head Lord Emsworth and his idyllic home of Blandings Castle, Mr. Mulliner and his improbable recollections in the Angler’s Rest pub and the Oldest Member and his golf stories. 

It is also notable that, having moved to France in 1934 for tax reasons, in 1940, Wodehouse was taken prisoner at Le Touquet in northern France by the invading Germans and interned for nearly a year. On his release, six broadcasts (comic rather than political) from German radio in Berlin to the United States led to anger in Britain, and he never returned to England. From 1947, he lived, instead, in the US, taking dual British-American citizenship in 1955.

Over the course of his long career, Wodehouse wrote more than 70 novels, 40 plays (including books for musicals), and 20 collections of short stories, as well as assorted articles, autobiographical stories, and poetry. He died in 1975, aged 93, in Southampton, New York.

Public Domain (P)2007 P. G. Wodehouse

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  • 2020-07-29

Wonderfully Entertaining!

I laughed out loud through most of this audiobook!
What a talented author with perfect narration!