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Infinite Powers

How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe
Auteur(s): Steven Strogatz
Narrateur(s): Bob Souer
Durée: 10 h et 41 min
Catégories: Histoire, Monde
4.5 out of 5 stars (8 évaluations)

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Description

Without calculus, we wouldn't have cell phones, TV, GPS, or ultrasound. We wouldn't have unraveled DNA or discovered Neptune or figured out how to put 5,000 songs in your pocket.    

Though many of us were scared away from this essential, engrossing subject in high school and college, Steven Strogatz's brilliantly creative, down-to-earth history shows that calculus is not about complexity; it's about simplicity. It harnesses an unreal number - infinity - to tackle real world problems, breaking them down into easier ones and then reassembling the answers into solutions that feel miraculous.    

Infinite Powers recounts how calculus tantalized and thrilled its inventors, starting with its first glimmers in ancient Greece and bringing us right up to the discovery of gravitational waves. Strogatz reveals how this form of math rose to the challenges of each age: how to determine the area of a circle with only sand and a stick; how to explain why Mars goes "backwards" sometimes; how to turn the tide in the fight against AIDS.    

As Strogatz proves, calculus is truly the language of the universe. By unveiling the principles of that language, Infinite Powers makes us marvel at the world anew.

©2019 Steven Strogatz (P)2019 Tantor

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Au global

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars

Narration borders on unlistenable

It's challenging to give this a fair review. The text clearly included jokes and whimsical passages, but it was virtually impossible to appreciate these given the narration. The narration borders on unlistenable.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2019-09-05

Elegant, clear, cutting edge.

If you're curious, but mathematically hopeless, this is splendid. I found the opening overview particularly illuminating, but throughout it joins history, to biography, to physics, to math in a clear but not condescending manner.

10 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous
  • 2019-09-05

Great for those learning calculus

I'm in differential equations right now this is a good overview of the theories of calculus and covers aspects missed in lectures

7 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • A Reader in Maine
  • 2020-02-21

Fascinating Book, but...

As someone who has taught calculus, I found this book quite fascinating. I am not so sure that someone who stopped at, say, high school algebra would get that much out of it. Also, I think this is a book quite ill suited to listening. I will probably buy the hard copy and read it again. It is very hard to follow equations read out loud, even when I know what is coming.

This book gave me several new insights to bring into my teaching.

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • M. McCreary
  • 2020-02-10

Read the book

This is a great discussion of the development and use of calculus, but if you're not comfortable with the topic, the audiobook isn't the best way to read it. The narrator does a great job, but with so many equations in the text, it's just easier to read the hard copy.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • J. Gudger
  • 2020-01-30

Great overbiew

I'm not a math person by trade although I do enjoy mathematics. This book is a great way to get a wide breadth idea of the history of calculus. I suggest this book to anyone who kind of wants to know about the math without getting too into the Weeds about how to do it. Beautifully written and excellently narrated.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Timothy S.
  • 2020-01-24

Infinitely Awesome! So much fun.

Missing insight on eastern math is meaningless compared to the tale of modern infinities.

Fun listen on headphones but some pencil and paper moments when a peek at the math is required.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Tyler
  • 2019-12-29

Beautiful

As a young newly inspired fellow, I’ve been surprisingly driven to read and listen to such books as Strogatz’s here. It gorgeously weaves often difficult to imagine notions of mathematics into a web of relevance.

I am registered to take calculus in the next semester, and could not have imagined a better primer. I’m hooked. I am craving to learn more, and this book has teased the desire for advancement to an incredible degree. I’ve listed this book as one I must return to after actually learning to DO the calculus he dances around. But until then, I have only dreamy things to say about the book.

Narration is wonderful. As with any scientific / mathematic audio, there are tedious portions where it becomes difficult to follow given the nature of embedding equations and proofs into paragraphs. But this is, to me, apparent and obvious. I like to consider the portions of technical speak as a challenge to myself whether I can follow. I’ll repeat it several times until I understand or decide I’m not quite studied enough to understand more deeply than I do.

Mathematics is a language of translating “reality” into symbols and back again, judging their synergy along the way. To expect a book on mathematics NOT to contain technical paragraphs, is a mistake. I loved them.

If you are reading reviews looking for fuel to motivate your own decision, do it.

Especially if you are willing to be curious.
If you would like to learn.
And if you want to explore the universe, mathematics is nestled amongst the best available tools to do so.

Dive in. Enjoy.

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • TJ Granack
  • 2019-09-17

Disappointing

William Gilbert, not Galileo Galilei, wrote the first book to use scientific method. It's called De Magnete, published in 1600, Kind of a famous treatise. (There's an original copy at the SPARK Museum of Electrical Invention in their permanent Dawn of the Electrical Age Exhibit, Bellingham, WA.)
Minor inaccuracies like this made the book irritating and ultimately unreadable. Perhaps this book is intended for beginners uninterested in specifics (Galileo is a more easily recognizable & memorable name--and perhaps the author thought it too confusing for readers to get the whole Galileo, Kepler & Gilbert thing right.) You'd think a book on mathmatics would be more accurate and less interested in shaving corners to make a point.
TJ Granack

5 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Dillird
  • 2020-01-05

No more pc revisionism pls

Was it the "Islamic Arabs" who made innovations in algebra? or the pre Islamic Persians? Appears to be more historical revisionism, here. I'm also tired of the perpetuation of the Einstein myth. The man was a fraud who stole his ideas from German scientists who came up with them long before Saint Einstein broke onto the scene.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Todd
  • 2019-09-20

Lots of rehash

A lot of what's in here has already been covered elsewhere. It didn't really bring up anything new. If you're an engineer, no need to read this.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile