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Inglorious Empire

What the British Did to India
Auteur(s): Shashi Tharoor
Narrateur(s): Shashi Tharoor
Durée: 10 h et 33 min
Catégories: Histoire, Europe
5 out of 5 stars (25 évaluations)

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Description

In the 18th century, India's share of the world economy was as large as Europe's. By 1947, after two centuries of British rule, it had decreased six-fold. Beyond conquest and deception, the Empire blew rebels from cannons, massacred unarmed protesters, entrenched institutionalized racism, and caused millions to die from starvation.  

British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes on and demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial "gift" - from the railways to the rule of law - was designed in Britain's interests alone. He goes on to show how Britain's Industrial Revolution was founded on India's deindustrialization and the destruction of its textile industry. 

In this bold and incisive reassessment of colonialism, Tharoor exposes to devastating effect the inglorious reality of Britain's stained Indian legacy.

©2016 Shashi Tharoor (P)2018 Tantor

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Au global

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Overwhelming with facts (could be fiction )

The author have very good argument against the colonial past. I am overwhelmed with facts but to an extend sound like fiction as well.
Very well narrated with dynamic voice of the author.
I wonder if this book will produce anything positive or constructive. I feel The narrative of this book is falling into the category of rising popular ism. I believe this book will produce more ultra-nationalism fanaticism and some friction among nations especially between Britain and India.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

Irrefutable details well interwoven

such a learning experience to understand the atrocities British done during the colonization in India. helps us to understand how blessed we are to be born in the post colonial era. else all the hard work of us/indians would have been looted by the British. Every british should feel shame for what their ancestors had done to many countries for more than 250 years.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Can it be told any better? I believe not.

Coming from the Indian subcontinent, I'm very much aware of what the British did during colonial times. My grandfather was an anti colonialist and spent years in jail for his activism. The Raj even offered him the vaunted district commissioner role in exchange of his views towards it. But nothing suade him from his zeal to rid the nation of colonial power. ST has done a marvelous job in summarizing 200 years of oppressions and subjection of India.

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  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • James Moseley
  • 2020-01-07

An entertaining and provocative history

Having lived in India for two years and having researched and written two books while there, I vaguely knew a fair bit of Tharoor's thesis, but this book drew threads of information that I was vaguely aware of into a carefully woven Bayeaux tapestry of the corrupt British Raj. It makes you think. The more history I read, the fewer heroes I have. This book answers questions that I have often fleetingly considered, such as how England ever managed to dredge up the resources to win the Napoleonic Wars, the Boer War, and WWI and WWII - apart from getting bailed out by the USA in the latter two. Well, the answer is, they were siphoning off the human and material wealth of India and using it to prop themselves up against what otherwise would have been insuperable enemies. I also understood from this study for the first time how so many upper class Britons in the 18th, 19th and early 20th Centuries managed to lead lives of such idle affluence - they did it directly or indirectly by picking India's pocket. Tharoor is pretty fair, which is refreshing. He freely admits the failures of Indians which permitted the English to subjugate them and also recounts the resistance that eventually put British Dominion to an end. You might consider this book one-sided, but that's defensible, because it is meant to be a thesis and exposé of the Raj, not a full trial by jury of the defendants, the Colonialists, and the plaintiff Indians. Still, Tharoor is good at acknowledging the arguments that arise against his, and personally I find Tharoor's thesis more persuasive than the antithesis. Mercantilism was a shockingly rapacious and cruel thing and those who practiced it had much to be ashamed of. But we should be careful not to read history backwards. The bad stuff that the winners in history did are probably the very things the losers wish they had done but couldn't manage to do. We will never know, but just as, in my view, we shouldn't lionize the rogues who won, we shouldn't too gullibly romanticize those who lost. As the Bible says so wisely, there are none who do good, not one - all fall short of the glory (worth) of God. The great value of history, apart from its riveting dramatic value, is the moral lessons it teaches - how we may rise on the stepping stones of the dead past to be better than our forbears.

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • saurabh
  • 2020-02-10

very refreshing....a must read i'd say

a must read i'd say.. the more we go further ..more intriguing the details become.

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Christopher
  • 2020-01-24

Healthy antidote to Raj romanticism

This book is a biting indictment of the two centuries of British rule in India. While the author makes the point that not all the ills of modern day India can be laid at the feet of the British, he is very clear on the problems that do owe something to the legacy of colonization, and particularly from the disordered and irresponsible way in which Great Britain shed India after the Second World War.
The arguments are cogent, the evidence appalling. They serve as a useful and powerful antidote to the sort of rose-colored romanticism that comes from works of British fiction around the end of the Raj, like Paul Scott's "Jewel in the Crown" tetralogy. In an era when the legacy of post-colonial troubles is front and center, it would be well to understand what actually went on in the empire on which the sun never set.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sameer Siddhanti
  • 2020-01-16

An artistically crafted treatise on British Raj

There is no Indian who is not familiar with this well articulate voice in Indian politics. While, I do not endorse his views regarding the current politics or the current dispensation, I must say, listening to him through this book has been an unforgettable experience that would be both cherished and reflected upon. It was a pleasure listening this audiobook both in its content and its linguistic mastery. I highly recommend this book to all Indians, English and to all those who romance the idea of British Imperialism. The book did influence my views a little regarding Indian sociopolitical issues.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jitendra Kumar Meena
  • 2018-12-31

one of the best from Shashi Tharoor!

liked the narration, presentation of facts and a calculated, critical assessment of British Raj in India.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Vij
  • 2019-03-08

Excellent book

Every child in ex-colinies should read this book. this boojs should be made part of academic curriculum.

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Humza Malik
  • 2019-01-17

No Sugar court

a good narrative and lots of information about ways of the inglorious empire, and there total disregard for basic humanity when it came to the needs of the masses.
He did not sugar court at all

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Pudd Master
  • 2019-01-15

I understand my people

Loved it, basically, all the things I found wrong with my people are a result of the British. haha, just kidding, but this gives great insight to the story of India and how the British only set us back, we are determined to change the world. and Tea isn't Indian... WTF!!

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Cowboy Up!!
  • 2019-08-06

Lame

Totally a Negative view of The British Empire! Not worth reading! Not good when the author insults other authors or historians!

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile