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The Box

How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger
Auteur(s): Marc Levinson
Narrateur(s): Adam Lofbomm
Durée: 12 h et 20 min
Catégories: Affaires, Économie
4.5 out of 5 stars (18 évaluations)

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Description

In April 1956, a refitted oil tanker carried 58 shipping containers from Newark to Houston. From that modest beginning, container shipping developed into a huge industry that made the boom in global trade possible.

The Box tells the dramatic story of the container's creation, the decade of struggle before it was widely adopted, and the sweeping economic consequences of the sharp fall in transportation costs that containerization brought about.

Published on the 50th anniversary of the first container voyage, this is the first comprehensive history of the shipping container. It recounts how the drive and imagination of an iconoclastic entrepreneur, Malcom McLean, turned containerization from an impractical idea into a massive industry that slashed the cost of transporting goods around the world and made the boom in global trade possible.

But the container didn't just happen. Its adoption required huge sums of money, both from private investors and from ports that aspired to be on the leading edge of a new technology. It required years of high-stakes bargaining with two of the titans of organized labor, Harry Bridges and Teddy Gleason, as well as delicate negotiations on standards that made it possible for almost any container to travel on any truck or train or ship. Ultimately, it took McLean's success in supplying U.S. forces in Vietnam to persuade the world of the container's potential.

Drawing on previously neglected sources, economist Marc Levinson shows how the container transformed economic geography, devastating traditional ports such as New York and London and fueling the growth of previously obscure ones, such as Oakland. By making shipping so cheap that industry could locate factories far from its customers, the container paved the way for Asia to become the world's workshop and brought consumers a previously unimaginable variety of low-cost products from around the globe.

©2006, 2007 Princeton University Press (P)2014 Marc Levinson

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Moyenne des évaluations de clients

Au global

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • -E
  • 2014-07-23

Outstanding!

Any additional comments?

Marc Levinson finally wrote the book that was long-overdue to be written. Professors often tell students that the shipping container revolutionized business platform around the world, but until now, they weren't been able to explain exactly *how* this came about. Before shipping standardization, international trade was not much to speak of by comparison since loading and unloading merchant ships with non-standardized items such as baskets, barrels, cages, bags, etc. would take several days and many bodies. The vision and implementation was driven by entrepreneurs like Malcom McLean, among others. The idea was to be able to take a container off of a truck or rail car, effortlessly place it onto a ship, quickly remove it from the ship and place it onto another truck or rail car (intermodal freight transport). Along the way, McLean and his competitors fought against protectionism from the railroads, trade unions and various governments, but ultimately, the demand for standardization became strongest during the Vietnam War as the US government desperately sought a more efficient means to transport goods.

The Box is both exciting and very well-written. Anyone remotely interested in international trade, business, logistics or related fields should consider The Box a must-read!

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • zombie64
  • 2014-07-15

Fascinating Topic sometimes lost in minutiae

What did you love best about The Box?

The author did the best he could with a very technical topic. He started quite strong, with images of how society before the container moved goods and what waterfront life looked like. But throughout the middle of the book he spent too much time on the legal wranglings of the unions and various commercial and municipal entities and the unstandardized box sizes, etc. Although the author seemed to lose sight of his own story at times, he would always come back to it because it was anchored around the lives of a few key individuals, especially that of Malcolm McLean, the "father" of container shipping. The narration was unproblematic, but not stellar. For a topic such as this, I wouldn't expect it to be.

What did you like best about this story?

This book definitely communicated the monumental changes that container shipping brought about, and also made us understand that container shipping was not an overnight success, but evolved over time through the perseverance of pioneering individuals who had a vision of its power to streamline society.

What three words best describe Adam Lofbomm’s voice?

Normal, non-irritating, radio.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No.

Any additional comments?

This was a great book with a respectable narration.

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Steven
  • 2018-11-09

Thinking outside 'The Box'

If the book were 30-50% shorter, it might have received higher ratings from me. Summation: Economy's of scale make sense. Global transportation, infrastructure and logistics require government subsidies and with that come government control and restrictions. You could fast forward to the last 6 minutes of the book to garner 80% of the knowledge in the book.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Holland
  • 2014-06-09

A portrait of disruptive innovation.

Any additional comments?

What kind of cutting edge technology allowed the world to collapse in size within a generation? It’s hiding in plain sight in every rail-yard and shipping port in the world- the humble shipping container. This isn’t so much a book about the transportation industry but rather a surprising look into a pivot point in globalization. The shipping container (or box) annihilated whole segments of the economy that were constructed around the inefficiency of break-bulk shipping and the sheer armies of labor required to transport goods via ship prior to this simple concept.If you enjoy economics and the nature of trade give this a listen!

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • John
  • 2014-06-02

Disappointing

I bought this audiobook with high hopes after I saw that it got pretty good reviews and because I am always interested in a good business/economics story. I was disappointed. The story is straightforward and fairly dry. This felt stretched as a book and would have been a better long magazine article. In addition, the narrator is pretty flat. This one was a bit of a slog to get through.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • drew
  • 2020-02-28

Like others have mentioned

Great book a lot of amazing stories and knowledge with a solid performance but it is numbers heavy and some may find it easier in print then audio just to keep up. Outstanding content though.

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Pavel
  • 2020-02-04

An avalanch of facts

Great story about how one of the most crucial logistics innovations came to be. Worth a listen.
Positives: Great abundance of facts and whenever possible - numbers
Negatives: From time to time the author would just dump too much facts in too short a time that would just break the overall sense of the story.

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Tirzah Moore
  • 2020-02-03

Super Interesting But The Narration Can Get Tiring

This is a fascinating look into the history of shipping containers and how a seemingly simply concept revolutionized the shipping industry. The writing style made it very easy to understand and kept my interest. There is a bit of history of the shipping industry in the beginning but you quickly get into the history of the shipping container. It is crazy to think that just 70 years ago in the 50's, the shipping container wasn't even a concept in anybody's mind. Today the world is much smaller thanks to Malcolm McLean and his relentless mission to efficiently get widgets from Point A to Point B.

The narration was pretty good but after awhile, I would have appreciated some changes in tone or tempo. I fully realize reading a book like this must be difficult but the last few chapters got to be a bit of a chore.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Utilisateur anonyme
  • 2019-11-15

Read it for Gradschool

very interesting and informative read. definitely enjoyed gaining a new perspective on a huge industry that I had little understanding of previously.

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Miha
  • 2019-08-23

Great book, poor editing

A good example of a great book suffering from poor editing. There are parts where it wants to be a history book, parts when it fantasizes about future, parts where it’s focused on global economy, parts when it wants to be an investigative journal,… it’s a mess. But the overall story is indeed super interesting - how such a “trivial” invention changed the global trade forever and in ways no one could ever imagine.

So I recommend it, but feel free to skip chapters.