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Description

The best-selling author of The Botany of Desire explores the ecology of eating to unveil why we consume what we consume in the 21st century.

"What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another, this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't, which mushrooms should be avoided, for example, and which berries we can enjoy. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance.

The cornucopia of the modern American supermarket and fast-food outlet has thrown us back on a bewildering landscape where we once again have to worry about which of those tasty-looking morsels might kill us. At the same time we're realizing that our food choices also have profound implications for the health of our environment. The Omnivore's Dilemma is best-selling author Michael Pollan's brilliant and eye-opening exploration of these little-known but vitally important dimensions of eating in America.

We are indeed what we eat, and what we eat remakes the world. A society of voracious and increasingly confused omnivores, we are just beginning to recognize the profound consequences of the simplest everyday food choices, both for ourselves and for the natural world. The Omnivore's Dilemma is a long-overdue book and one that will become known for bringing a completely fresh perspective to a question as ordinary and yet momentous as "What shall we have for dinner?"

©2006 Michael Pollan (P)2006 Penguin Audio

Ce que les critiques en disent

Gold Medal in Nonfiction for the California Book Award • Winner of the 2007 Bay Area Book Award for Nonfiction • Winner of the 2007 James Beard Book Award/Writing on Food Category • Finalist for the 2007 Orion Book Award • Finalist for the 2007 NBCC Award

"Thoughtful, engrossing.... You're not likely to get a better explanation of exactly where your food comes from." (The New York Times Book Review)

"An eater's manifesto...[Pollan's] cause is just, his thinking is clear, and his writing is compelling. Be careful of your dinner!" (The Washington Post)

Ce que les auditeurs disent de The Omnivore's Dilemma

Moyenne des évaluations de clients
Au global
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Histoire
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

Plenty of food for thought

Should be required reading/listening for anything that can read and listen and who also eats. Our food shouldn't come from boxes.

" we eat by the grace of nature not industry"

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

A revelationary journey through food chain

Narration was excellent and never distracting.
Story managed to be both compelling and enlightening.
It will most likely force you to think about where your food comes from; just don't expect a guide to eating responsibly. That's left up to you to figure out.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

A thoughtful and well-rounded book.

Informative, poetic and very funny. I particularly enjoyed how the modern hype around organic industry is also examined. I learnt so much

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Incredibly well written and interesting

Even though this book deals with American food supply chains, it's still definitely a worthwhile read for Canadians, as many of the issues discussed in this book apply to us as well. Michael Pollan is an incredible writer, his style of investigative journalism interlaced with his own anecdotes is a delight to read, it kept me interested the whole way through. It's reshaped the way I view the food industry and what I eat, I think pretty much everyone would take away something from this book. A must read.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

very educational and informative

love the book! probably will read it again just really absorb everything! these books cover information that most people will never get the chance to learn in school!

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

If you eat, you should listen to this!

Informative, entertaining, captivaing! If you eat, you need to listen to this!! Michael takes you on a guided tour from farm to table, giving you the downlow on where your food really comes from! #Audible1

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent listen.

I struggled reading the actual book over a few attempts. The audio version was a very enjoyable way to experience the book which had a powerful ending.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Inspiring and eye opening

I absolutely love this book! So easy to listen, so informative and entertaining.

Michael Pollan is great because whatever he researches he immerses himself in the subject. Like literally!

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Life changing

Everyone should be required to read this book. It has completely changed the way I look at food and how I spend my money on food. My only critique is that I wish it was read by the author, as he, in my opinion, has the perfect voice for his own words. This narrator has an affectation that comes off quite pretentious, even though the underlying message is not. Still, worth every second and definitely worth a credit.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Turning on the light

I loved this book - although parts of it were difficult to hear - it was shining a light on what I already sort of knew. There is hope for more far reaching change in the booming movement of polly farming. I am amazed that we have evolved so much as a species and western culture- and yet are so blind and ignorant to how we nourish our bodies. Scott did a brilliant job narrating. This book was the catalyst for me - the game changer to a healthier lifestyle and conscious food choices.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • MCRedding
  • 2009-02-07

Great presentation of a moral dilemma

Pollan's examination of the cultural, moral and socioeconomic tradeoffs we make when eating food is a deep and exhaustive consideration of the consequences of seeming simple choices. By structuring the work around 4 meals, he presents four alternative relationships to nature and the world, and lays bare the personal consequences of each. I found that the detail was, at times unnecessarily fastidious, as when Pollan agonizes over the authenticity of hunting, but not killing, the wild boar in his hunter and gatherer meal, and then taking us through the process again, just so he can personally pull the trigger. I would have rather he had just lied, and took credit for the first kill.

The mix of science, economics and gastronomy was what I would like the Food Network to really be about. The personal perspective of the book sometimes got in the way, but gave it a visceral feel that kept my interest.

What did I learn from the book? That sorting out the food chains involved in what I eat daily is way too complicated to really address it in real life. I would have liked to see an epilogue that explained the way Pollan has worked it out. He hints at this at the end, but doesn't ever present a cogent agenda for how making responsible choices about food fits into the real world of budgets and schedules that we have developed since making the evolutionary choice to not spent most of our waking hours feeding ourselves.

I learned how mushrooms are gathered and the physiology of corn. I learned more than I would ever really want to about the beef industry, and the ecology of grasses. Overall, it was an enjoyable read that will stick with me longer than the meal of boar and mushrooms Pollan serves to his friends at the end of the book.

60 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • chris
  • 2007-07-16

Engrossing and enlightening

When the book opened, I thought it was going to become some PETA fueled anti-meat rant, and then I thought it was going to become some anti-GM food hippy organic food rant, but I was wrong on both counts. It touches those subjects and many more. In fact, the book moves seamlessly between many subjects.

The author loves meat, and food, but he wants to know exactly where it comes from. He starts by homing in on corn, which is by far the most important component of our diet, being in almost everything we eat in one form or another (interesting, eh?). He then looks closer: how did corn come to dominate our diet, and why do farmers get paid less for their corn than it costs to grow it, and what is the real cost of all that cheap corn?

He then looks at the organic movement, and shows that organic is far from the pastoral ideal we imagine it to be. It is better than over-tilled and fertilized fields and manure filled feedlots, at least. I know a lot of farmers and I have seen some of this first-hand.

Then the author focuses on a truly sustainable farm, and the genius farmers who not only make it work, but make it work well. They can also tell you precisely why it works.

And that's only the first half of the book. The author keeps moving, filling the pages with startling facts and truly excellent writing. The author is apparently a journalist, and it shows in his extensive research and persuasive arguments.

I enjoyed this far more than I expected to. It helps, I suppose, that I was receptive to it. Still, I couldn't put it down, and I can recommend it to anyone who eats.

72 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Nancy
  • 2007-06-13

Good Content, Difficult Narration

I really enjoyed Michael Pallin's last book and this one is very good too. The section on local agriculture was very interesting. Bu the narrator was overly dramatic to the point of being difficult to listen to. I'm a dedicated listener, and I liked the book, but I nearly turned it off a few times due to the narration.

16 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Dave Staats
  • 2011-08-12

Great for anyone. Should be required in school.

This is a fascinating soup to nuts description of the food chain particularly in America. It felt like Mr. Pollan did a great job of presenting all sides of many questions in a way that leaves the reader free to make the best of some rather difficult choices. Right now, many people don't even realize there ARE choices. One great point of this book is that we don't really know what we are putting in ourselves. Scott Brick wasn't as hammy as usual since it was non-fiction.

15 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • history buff
  • 2009-08-26

FANTASTIC LISTEN!!

this is one fantastic book. do yourself, your family, loved ones, anyone who EATS FOOD!! a favor and give, discuss, live this book. my favorite gift to give. my health has improved dramatically by taking his lessons to heart.

8 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Kathryn
  • 2009-07-30

Loved it!

Quality from the research to the narration. Pollan deserves a medal for the work he's done. This is a dense book, and is particularly well-suited to audio. (Quite frankly, I'm not sure I would have gotten through the print version, and that would have been a shame.) One of the most influential books I've "read" in years.

8 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lily
  • 2008-11-02

Great book; didn't love the reading

While raving to a friend about Barbara Kingsolver's "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle", she recommended this book, so it was my next purchase. Early on I began to wonder if ANYTHING was really healthy and ethical to eat, unless you can produce all your own food! But it turned out to have some fascinating and valuable information about the way our food is grown, processed and transported, so it was well worth reading.

As for the narration... I've listened to several other books narrated by Scott Brick, and he's never been a favorite, but this was just baaaaddd. This book did NOT require a dramatic reading, but that's what it got! And I wish someone would give narrators a list of uncommon words in advance so he or she can be prepared! Mr. Brick really butchered a few words, and based on sentence context, I think he may have mis-read a few words altogether! I kept telling myself it's not a big deal - I got the point - but it's just so distracting!

79 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Joao
  • 2009-11-01

You owe yourself to listen to this book

This book is big, and the reason it's big is because there's a lot to say about this subject. You may decide to not change anything in your habits, but at least you'll be making a conscious decision. This book talks about how a lot of other people make decisions for us on what we eat in a journalistic way that is not radical. Tells it like it is, backed up with research. I thank the writer for getting this book out there and the reader/producers for making it possible for me to get its contents during my commute.

12 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Robert
  • 2011-08-29

A must read

I don't think most people welcome the knowledge contained in this selection. What's the expression?... more information than I wanted to know. But it's not more information than we need to know. The book is long. As a biologist and geek, it was not too long for me. While most of what I have listened to by Scott Brick has been fiction and I have not always appreciated him as a reader, I believe he was perfect for this book. My only concern is that because of its length, some readers might be turned off and this is not a subject that should be turned off or not listened and paid attention to.

18 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Elton
  • 2007-04-29

Corn as a Four Letter Word

So I guess Pollen doesn't like corn...I liked this book, but one thing I could not understand is the extravegant nature and methods Pollen uses to do the mundane. The lengths he goes to just to prepare a natural meal are pretty extraordinary. We do need greater transparency, especially when it comes to knowing what we are putting in our bodies for sustinance. This is clear...but I disagree with some of the subtle over statements and poor choices made by the author. He has a good point, but he should have fought the urge to indulge.

11 les gens ont trouvé cela utile