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Description

A masterpiece of historical fiction, this is the Great Novel of America's "Greatest Generation".

Herman Wouk's sweeping epic of World War II, which begins with The Winds of War and continues in War and Remembrance, stands as the crowning achievement of one of America's most celebrated storytellers. Like no other books about the war, Wouk's spellbinding narrative captures the tide of global events - and all the drama, romance, heroism, and tragedy of World War II - as it immerses us in the lives of a single American family drawn into the very center of the war's maelstrom.

©1971 Herman Wouk (P)2011 Audible, Inc.

Ce que les critiques en disent

"Wouk's real genius lies not just in the narrative power of his books, but in his empathy with the people and the times of which he writes…. The genius of The Winds of War and War and Remembrance is that they not only tell the story of the Holocaust, but tell it within the context of World War II, without which there is no understanding it." ( The Washington Post)

Ce que les auditeurs disent de The Winds of War

Moyenne des évaluations de clients
Au global
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    47
  • 4 étoiles
    8
  • 3 étoiles
    2
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    1
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    34
  • 4 étoiles
    13
  • 3 étoiles
    2
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    1
Histoire
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    36
  • 4 étoiles
    11
  • 3 étoiles
    2
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    1

Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Tee
  • 2018-05-30

WWII

By a curious coincidence, I listened to this audiobook in quick succession with two others by Jewish writers writing about WWII (including accounts of the European Jews under the Nazis): The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon, and QB VII by Leon Ulris. Each of these offer unique insights. All in, The Winds of War is an interesting book. Not quite a fun book (unlike The Amazing Adventures); not just from the Jews’ perspective and of concentration camps (unlike QB VII); but educational and broad-ranging. It is easy to listen to, as the language is contemporary, so one could multi-task while listening and yet follow along easily. Even the analyses, where they occur, are in plain language and pretty accessible to someone who’s not a WWII buff.

The book offers the U.S.’s perspective of the years (late ‘30s to 1941) running up to Pearl Harbor, i.e. prior to and up to U.S. officially entering WWII. Europe was already at war with Nazi Germany, and the Japanese on the move. Through the eyes of the Henry family, we gain glimpses into politics, personalities, military developments, battles, social changes etc during that period. Byron Henry’s adventures with Natalie Jastrow in Italy / Poland was a highlight.

Through the Jastrows and their relatives, we catch close-up accounts of the tragic ordeals of the Jews in Berlin, Warsaw and later Minsk. It felt like witnessing all the beloved characters in Fiddler on the Roof being cornered, carted off and massacred. One will probably not feel this in such a painful and personal way from history books or even holocaust museums.

It must have taken a lot of research and planning for Herman Wouk to skillfully position each member of the family in a place of action at the right time. In fact he also weaved in the memoirs of Armin von Roon, a German officer. This offers different views of the “good” and “bad” guys in history. It’s refreshing.

The book contains much information. For instance, Roosevelt’s “Lend Lease” is something I did not know before, and the fact that the Japanese attacked Clark Field back-to-back with Pearl Harbor.

A word about the characters... I am drawn to Byron’s free-spirited character, though he all but disappeared after Poland. Victor’s accounts dominate most of the latter part of the book, but I find him by-the-book and conservative, unlike his son. As for Natalie, all I could think, with increasing disbelief and exasperation throughout the book, was “get out of Italy!!”

The story continues in Part 2, “War and Remembrance”.

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

A Classic Story by Wouk

This book might appeal more to those who lived through WWII or those who are simply facinated by the Era, however I would highly recommend it to anyone as a superb piece of historical fiction. Great character development and personal stories set astride the key events of the pre-war and war years. You will need to listen to War and Remembrance to complete this great story.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Best Historical Fiction Ever Written

Herman Wouk is the penultimate master at wrapping a fictional tale around real events.

I read Winds of War when it first came out and the story transported me again even after 47 years.

The epic tale is told so well and so complete yet not in a grandiose way. You can so easily relate and believe you are a part of the Henry family.

Wouk will forever remain my weaver of historic tales. All these years later, still none can compare.

I suggest you read his sequel, too, War and Remembrance, just as stellar!

Only downside: the tale ended.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Epic WWII Saga

Great historical fiction and must listen for Wouk and WWII history fans. Greatly enjoyed the experience.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

great book

#Audible1 could not stop listening to this book the narrator is fantastic. war and remembrance is great as well.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Robert
  • 2013-05-24

A Masterpiece

Winds of War is the first in a two book historical fiction series about WWII. The time span of this first installment begins six months before the German invasion of Poland and ends with the attack on Pearl Harbor and the official entry of the US into the war. I found the story’s prelude to the war to be one of the most fascinating aspects of the book and it all mostly revolves around the life and naval career of one Victor “Pug” Henry, his immediate and extended family.

Prior to the war, this fictional character Pug, a naval attache to Berlin, draws the attention of FDR after writing an insightful prediction of the German-Russian nonaggression pact. Thus begins the relationship between Pug and FDR that will keep the former on land instead of at sea as the personal, though mostly unofficial, “intelligence” officer to the President. Pug’s goings and comings including his meetings with the likes of Hitler, Mussolini, Churchill and Stalin serve as the backbone of this novel.

I generally avoid books of this ilk aware that so many dwell on the Nazi atrocities that are more than this reader can handle. While mention is made of these, it is not what the book explores in detail and again, the novel is about the antecedent and beginning aspects of the war when not a great deal was known about what was going on in camps behind barbed wire.

I sometimes had issues with the book’s editing. The book is 46 hours (~900 pages) in length. I do not hesitate to take on a tome of this length as long as I don’t encounter too much fluff. And, while I felt there was not an inordinate amount of triviality, there were episodes of detail about the personal lives of friends and relatives of Pug that I could have done without. That said, this was still a “driveway” book; a book I would sit in my driveway upon returning home after my drive from work and continue listening to because it was just that captivating. Not to be misunderstood, I believe that the relating of the lives of Pug’s family and friends were essential to the book. It made the historical events personal, not just cold hard facts. I did feel, however, that the emotions of his immediate family were sometimes rather cavalier with respect to war in general. But they were what they were.

IMHO, the book is a masterpiece. The three E’s are all there contained within its covers. The book is educational, enlightening and entertaining. The text is peppered with excerpts from a fictional dissertation by a German General Armin von Roon. I found his [Nazi] German perspective on Hitler and the war to be particularly fascinating.

Finally, the book is made even better by the superlative narration and performance of Kevin Pariseau. I do not believe a book has ever been better performed. I would recommend this book to everyone.

261 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ann hartnell
  • 2011-10-25

Still a fantastic work

I read Winds of War 40 years ago when it came out & have reread it at least once since. It has always remained one of my all time favorites. The audio version is just wonderful with great narration that brings the characters to life. As with the book, I lived the story for the last several days as I listened every minute available.
The depth of the story, large cast of characters that Herman Wouk handles like a master so you never think, "now who is this?" & the way he paints visual images of people, places & events fully immerses the reader from page 1.
There is never a boring minute. Even with the length of this book, I was ready for more as it finished, not glad it was done.
I would recommend this audiobook to everyone & only hope War & Remembrance will come next & soon.

124 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Arken
  • 2011-11-07

Great storytelling

I have a real appreciation of the works of Herman Wouk. He was one of the first "grownup" authors I read, devouring "The Caine Mutiny" as a 14-year-old, and then a couple of years later reading this work. I was in college when "War and Remembrance" finally came out, and I remember going to the mall to buy a much-needed pair of pants and instead buying the book! Over the years I developed a taste for English literature, particularly 19th-Century stuff -- Austen, Dickens, Trollope, George Eliot -- the usual suspects. And Herman Wouk was always mentioned as an almost quintessential second-rate writer. Perhaps because of my youthful awakening under his spell, I have never thought of him like that. When people say he writes soap operas and wooden dialog, I don't see it. I think his characters are well-drawn, his plots full of interest, and his style very straightforward and middle-American (in a good way!) Maybe it's because one of his themes is the value of the seemingly boring, day-to-day doers who get most of the jobs in the world done. Pug Henry in "The Winds of War" is that sort of person. His other books don't make heroes out of these plodders -- lots of them in the role of the behind-the-scenes fathers, providing the wherewithal for the more interesting lives of the younger generations.

"The Winds of War" seems to me to be written as part English novel of manners and part a great, long complicated work of Dickens. There are lots of characters who are drawn realistically, but they are put in situations requiring strange coincidences and improbable virtues. Victor Henry is the chief example of this. He is a convincingly-portrayed career naval officer thrust into a minor diplomatic post against his will. But then he displays a level of acumen and presence of mind to rival the the greatest of statesmen. He always seems to come up with the perfect thing to say, earning him the surprised respect of the big shots of the era (Big big-shots, like Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin.) He is perhaps just a bit too perceptive and unfailingly correct to be quite believable, but he overall feels like a real person we are following around the globe. His rocky relationships with his children seem real enough, and his personal traits are well-drawn and always interesting.

The real model for this work and the sequel is the great "War and Peace" -- the mixture of personal stories with world events, the encounters with real historical personages, and the mixing of historical narratives with the story line. This works successfully as a plan for the two books, I think, despite the great chutzpah it took to try it. I don't claim that Wouk is the writer Tolstoy is, but WWII is a theme that can at least deserve the same kind of treatment. The brief interlude that the hero and his love interest spend at Tolstoy's estate accompanied by a moment of dejavu make this treatment explicit.

Finally, this very entertaining and even (I would argue) profound story is beautifully narrated by Kevin Pariseau. He does the usual different voices that all the good narrators pull off but he also does accents, and even impersonations when necessary (e.g., Roosevelt and Churchill.) I am very much looking forward to his rendition of "War and Remembrance", assuming that will be following soon.

104 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jan
  • 2013-10-25

45 hours + 56 hours = 102 hours of listening

The "Winds of War" is actually the first of a pair of novels which ambitiously cover WWII from beginning to end. The books follow the "Pug" Henry family and close friends as they are conveniently placed into each location where important events occur leading up to and during the start of the war. The fictional family events are woven through the factual historical events with experiences, letters, book excepts, newspapers and conversations used to guide the reader through the war. This book ends with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and all characters are left dangling... scattered around the world. The story is completed in the next book - "War and Remembrance." So you are looking at 102 hours of listening to completely read. I have to admit I was ready for something new when I finished, and some parts were boring... but I did enjoy it and learned tons. I have read a lot of WWII books set in specific areas, but this one helped me understand the entire war... step by step what happened where, when and why. It is presented in a PG to PG 13 format with mild language, mild sexual content, lots of drinking and of course the violence of war. It is slowly paced with a vintage feel although written in 70's (it's not a action packed Ken Follet type novel). Not as beautifully written as Wouk's "The Cain Mutiny" but still very satisfying and lots of reading for a credit.

58 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Olaf
  • 2011-10-23

Genius combination of writing and narrating

Contrary to the rule, I firstly want to extend my deepest appreciation to the narrator of this book. Kevin Pariseau performs marvelously and brings the book to life with colors and atmosphere coming close to pictures. He not only attaches well chosen timbre to the characters but even excels in singing - I see images by his reading. It is plainly outstanding. The story is - at least for me - extremely interesting and reveals a great deal of wartime in Europe. The characters are carefully developed and the alternation of political and private events and settings is very entertaining and consistent. I could hardly stop listening and recommend this book whole heartedly.

74 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ryan
  • 2014-09-06

Epic historical drama

At over 100 hours, this audiobook and its sequel are a commitment, a 20th century War and Peace. Over 2000 pages, Herman Wouk spins both a family saga and a sort of “bearing witness” document, a detailed history of World War Two that leaves no one excused for humanity’s greatest calamity (so far) and the many acts of blindness on both sides that allowed it to unfold as it did

The fictional narrative centers around an American naval family headed by one Victor “Pug” Henry, a stolid, unpretentious career officer of classic mold. Yearning for a battleship command, Victor is instead sent to be the US’s naval attache in 1939 Berlin, at a time well before most Americans had any desire to get embroiled in another European mess. Because of his thorough reports, Victor finds himself coming to the attention of FDR, who makes him a high-powered informal go-between. Meanwhile, Victor’s two sons have their own stories -- one training as a Navy pilot, while the other “finds himself” in Italy, where he gets involved with a Jewish author and his lovely, headstrong niece. These two, trapped in Europe, become significant viewpoint characters in their own right. Others enter the narrative, too, including Victor’s wife, who is beginning to chafe at the sacrifices of being a Navy wife, and his daughter, who takes a job at a NYC radio station. While most of the action happens behind the lines, we do get a few tastes of the shooting war.

Wouk’s style is a bit nostalgic, but the characters are well-written and credible. For all the contrivances in the plot -- such as Victor managing to meet Hitler, FDR, Churchill, *and* Stalin -- Wouk makes us believe that such path-crossings were plausible. Maybe one family wasn’t in so many places, but history did have plenty of small actors who played such roles. In any case, the small details of the characters’ thoughts and actions give events a full, living color. Sometimes Wouk pulls the camera back and explains in a clear, compelling way what was happening on the broader stage, which was a counterpoint that appealed to me, since the protagonists seldom have all the facts themselves. It’s to his credit that almost nothing feels irrelevant -- personalities and family lives seem to dovetail neatly into greater events and vice-versa.

No, Herman Wouk isn’t Tolstoy, but he’s certainly a writer with a strong grasp of the forces of history, gentle insight into human behavior, the ability to connect small-scale events with large ones, and a storyteller’s gift for putting it all in familiar terms, through the eyes of some memorable characters.

What pleased me most about this book, though, and a big reason for my enthusiastic recommendation, is its absence of simplistic rah-rah patriotism. Instead, Wouk soberly examines the causes of the war and the dangers of nationalism and ideology. He also notes the hypocrisies of British and American imperialism, and the self-absorbed apathy of both countries in the face of fascism’s self-image of surety. One of the most fascinating features of the novel is the inclusion of the memoirs of a German general, translated decades after the war by Pug himself. There’s a creepy familiarity to his critiques of the “decadent” West, and one begins to remember that evil is often rationalized away, sometime quite convincingly, by those who worship strength and power. This mattered at the time the author was writing, around the height of the Vietnam War, and it matters now.

Ultimately, this novel and its sequel are a rich mix of intimate and broad-scale human themes, 20th century history, and wistful nostalgia for a time when the American middle class family embodied all that was hopeful. Audiobook narrator Kevin Pariseau rises to the occasion, with some impressive imitations of certain famous figures, a range of accents, and a narration voice that has both friendliness and gravity. Put the sequel on standby, because you’ll want to know what happens next.

31 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Book and Movie Lover
  • 2011-10-31

Eagerly awaiting the next installment

This is one of those books you will not want to finish, even though it is over 40 hours of listening. A WW II novel, it starts soon after Hitler was elected and carries through the attack on Pearl Harbor, following the lives of the Henry family and those they encounter. The central character, Victor ("Pug") Henry is a Navy man who becomes one of FDR's confidantes, as a plot mechanism to bring FDR into the story in a personal way. Through the experiences of Pug and his family, we learn much about FDR, pre-war Nazi Germany, Stalin, and the crimes against the Jews of Europe. Also explored is the plight of Britain and the reluctance of 80% of Americans to participate in another European war. The characters throughout the book are well developed and quite familiar by the time the book ends. I am very much looking forward to the next installment, War and Remembrance, which I believe will be on audible.com by the end of November 2011.

46 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Hollace
  • 2011-11-03

Thrilled!

I read this book and "War and Rememberance" years ago. I have always hoped it would become available on Audible. I was not disappointed. I am really perplexed that anyone could find a reason to score this book below 5 stars in any area. Pariseau makes the story really pop!!! I can't wait for "War and Rememberance" to be available and I hope Pariseau once again is the narrator. Thank you Audible!

34 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Connie
  • 2011-11-11

War & Peace lite, but still enlightening

As much as I love historical fiction, I didn't think any author short of Tolstoy could make battle strategy interesting to me, but Wouk did. My test of good historical fiction is being "driven" to fact check a detail then being able to jump right back into the world of the story, and not wanting to leave. This book beat a satisfying path to my reference shelf.

I expected only a pot-boiler with a traditional Yankee bias, but the novel exceeded that, both in style and content.

Narrator Parriseau does a good job, but with such a range of voices and characters there are some misses.

32 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Bebe
  • 2011-11-02

A good old-fashioned historical epic novel

I don't know when I've enjoyed a book more. This is a really interesting book with multiple plot lines. I've listened to a LOT of WWII history. This brought the first part of the war to life. I hope Audible has War and Remembrance soon.

I liked this book so much that I ordered the mini-series so I can watch it.

27 les gens ont trouvé cela utile