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Witch: A Tale of Terror

Narrateur(s): Sam Harris
Durée: 3 h et 4 min
Catégories: Histoire, Europe
4 out of 5 stars (54 évaluations)

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Description

For centuries in Europe, innocent men and women were murdered for the imaginary crime of witchcraft. This was a mass delusion and moral panic, driven by pious superstition and a deadly commitment to religious conformity. In Witch: A Tale of Terror, best-selling author Sam Harris introduces and reads from Charles Mackay's beloved book Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.

Public Domain (P)2016 Sam Harris

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Au global

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Histoire

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Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live

Listening to Sam recite the horrors men and women were subjected to for the imaginary crime of witchcraft is simultaneously enthralling and disturbing.

It is thought provoking to imagine that people were put to death for such bewildering claims as are documented in this book or for having the characteristics of being a witch. (ugly, old or just unpopular)

Listen and consider the value of rational thought and the impact methodological naturalism has had on our lives in chasing superstition to the shadows.

Imagine - you might have been so accused and made to confess under the less than gentle persuasion of your neighbours.

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars

Informative, non history of witch hunts and trials

A rather dry, but interesting retelling of infamous witch trials that swept Europe then America in the 17th Century. The book cover is a bit misleading; this is a non-fiction novel. So beware..

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars

not bad coulda been better

when audible book writers look for narrator's why they dont get sumone who sounds interesting is beyond me I only kept listening because of the story which wasnt really that interesting....

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

Fascinating, Informative, and Entertaining

This book is too short. It ended with me wanting more. Charles McKay's work is peppered with anecdotes which bring to life his conclusions about the nonsensical nature of witch-hunting.
Sam Harris is a good reader. I've listened to his podcast before, and the man knows how to make a point. Unfortunately, his zealous atheism shows through in his foreward and how he edits the work.

3.5 stars out of 5

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  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • aspidistra
  • 2017-02-25

more Sam, please

What made the experience of listening to Witch: A Tale of Terror the most enjoyable?

Sam's choices from the text, and delightful reading.

Any additional comments?

I'd like to encourage Sam to do more short audiobooks like this where he excerpts some of his favorite books, does a preface, and then reads selections. I'd buy them all.

15 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Karl Boone
  • 2017-02-25

Interesting and informative

If you could sum up Witch: A Tale of Terror in three words, what would they be?

Shocking and horrifying

What was one of the most memorable moments of Witch: A Tale of Terror?

Covers in grim detail a dark and superstitious era in Europe that happened from the 12th to late into the 17th century.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

What really surprised me was that the crusaders were charged for witch craft, and later Joan of Arc. Along with the inhumanly way self-proclaimed morale people treated those accused of a non-crime. Along with the ways they used a "holy" book to justify their cruelty.

Any additional comments?

It's an informative book to listen to and Sam Harris does a great job imparting the information in the book.

6 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • A Stevens
  • 2017-02-25

An uncomfortable reminder of the power of belief

This well-produced audiobook is introduced and read by author & neuroscientist, Sam Harris, who is also host of the very popular 'Waking Up' podcast. Harris' experience as a podcast host, reader of the audiobook versions of several of his own books and leading light across a diverse field of important public conversations and debates shines through in his measured yet compelling reading.

The subject material concerns the 'Witch Mania' of Early Modern Europe, as described by Charles Mackay in his seminal 1841 book, 'Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds'. The quality of Mackay's writing is excellent and the detailed picture he paints of this extraordinarily tragic (and often gruesome) period (which for Mackay - and even, to some extent, for us now - was relatively recent) conveys in almost palpable terms the ability of individuals and societies to drive themselves into an ever-deeper ditch of terrible suffering when the wheels of their beliefs (which drive their behaviour and much of their experience of the world) run-off the rails of reason.

8 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jacomien de Klerk
  • 2017-02-05

Unconscionable Christianity - Burning Women

Sam Harris found this and reads it to illustrate a point - how presumably good people do the most terrible things in the name of their religious beliefs. Shocking, mortifying, stomach-turning, and more relevant than ever in these theocratic times. Five stars on every count.

9 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • willie bond
  • 2019-07-03

Religion strikes again.

Religion and superstition show their true colors once again. Leave it to human beings to murder mass amounts of people only to assume they’re “doing the lords work”. Such a shame. Amazing book. Excellent narration.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jon
  • 2017-01-21

Couldn't stop listening!!!

Well written, well read, overall - great work!

I think it is very important to keep these accounts of suffering in the name of superstition available to our society, in an effort to rid our species of these atrocities in the future.

Once again, Sam Harris has produced an account of factual evidence that so clearly demonstrates the power of belief.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Oskar
  • 2017-01-18

Very interesting. Perfectly narrated by Sam Harris

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

This book is funny in parts but overall the context and content of the stories of witch hunt in Europe are fantastically tragic. The elaborate voice of Sam Harris is perfect for this absurd tale of superstition.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • optimistjl
  • 2019-10-30

great listen

a solemn reminder of past hysteria and the perverseness that still exist in no small number today

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Perry L. Porter
  • 2019-06-24

The details of the horrific treatment of so-called

this makes an excellent case of why it is so important to have separation of church and state so that the superstitions of one religious sect or another cannot use the power of local state or national government to turn around and torture and kill innocent people without proper checks and balances and oversight

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Neuron
  • 2017-12-28

Only witches talk to themselves…

This is an excerpt from the book Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles Mackay. He wrote this book in 1841, almost 200 years ago. Based on the excerpt, the title more or less says it all. The book, which has a slightly catalog-esque feel to it, describes a number of cases where a person, usually a woman or a girl, was accused of being a witch. It also gives you a brief history of witch hunts - from its peak in the beginning of the 17th century to the end in the late 18th century (although in some countries people still believe in witches).

It is entertaining in - a macabre kind of way – to read about the witch trials. Although I have read a fair amount about witches, I am still amazed every time I read about the trials. Witness accounts in which someone claimed to have seen a cat that looked like the accused were taken seriously. Experts claimed that if you talk at loud to yourself then you are definitively possessed by a demon and must, therefore, be a witch. I am guessing that to some extent the witch hunts were a way to satisfy the crowd's lust for blood and their desire for vengeance over the extreme hardships in their life. We should keep this in mind today when people on social media seem to think that they are better jurors than the people working within the judicial system.

If you want a brief introduction to the history of the witch-hunt, with a European bias, then this book is a good buy. However, you can get more detailed accounts (remember that this is an excerpt) and while the book has a Sam Harris feel to it, only small parts of it were actually authored by him.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile