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A Forbidden Rumspringa

Gay Amish Romance Series, Book 1
Written by: Keira Andrews
Narrated by: John Solo
Length: 8 hrs and 41 mins
Categories: LGBT
4.5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

When two young Amish men find love, will they risk losing everything?  

In a world where every detail of life - down to the width of a hat brim - is dictated by God and the all-powerful rules of the community, two men dare to imagine a different way. At 18, Isaac Byler knows little outside the strict Amish settlement of Zebulon, Minnesota, where there is no rumspringa for exploration beyond the boundaries of their insular world. Isaac knows he'll have to officially join the church and find a wife before too long, but he yearns for something else - something he can't name.  

Dark tragedy has left carpenter David Lantz alone to support his mother and sisters, and he can't put off joining the church any longer. But when he takes on Isaac as an apprentice, their attraction grows amid the sweat and sawdust. David shares his sinful secrets, and he and Isaac struggle to reconcile their shocking desires with their commitment to faith, family, and community. Now that they've found each other, are they willing to lose it all?   

Contains mature themes.

©2014 Keira Andrews (P)2019 Tantor

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Beautiful

3.5 Blue Roses
3.5 Blue Flames

Narrator John Solo performed an anxious forbidden romantic drama. Lots of drama. He reads very well and is work is usually good. His voices are easy differentiable and comfortable to listen to.

This story just rubbed me up the wrong way. I feel like pulling my hair out if I hear how people still allow themselves to be controlled with the fear of GOD. The plot was believable and I was sucked into it, maybe too deep.

It's like watching a horror movie, you keep watching although you absolutely don't want to.
We did have a HEA, and it sounds like we can expect more, since the boys have a place to escape to on the outside.

Happy Listening

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Aerielle
  • 2019-09-04

Heart wrenching!!!

Oh man this audio had me feeling ALL the feels. My heart broke for the pain Isaac and David went through while trying to figure out their forbidden relationship.
John Solo did a great job with the narration. I always enjoys audios he’s narrating.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • brennanboys3
  • 2019-08-29

Beautiful and narration was wonderful

Beautiful...

When I first read this book a few years ago I think it was my first Keira Andrews story. I never read anything about the Amish before and I was pretty new to reading m/m. This books solidified Keira Andrews as one of my favorite writers and I’ve never looked back.

This story is gentle in a way, it tells the tale of Isaac Byler, an Amish man who has always felt different from other men in his community who are joining church, getting baptized and taking wives. Isaac has always noticed David Lance, another man in the community who is a skilled carpenter and taking care of his mother and sisters after his fathers death a few years prior. When Isaac’s father sets up an apprenticeship for him with David, Isaac is so nervous and he just doesn’t quite understand why he gets that way around David. As they work together the two men grow closer and Isaac learns that his feelings for David are reciprocated. There is a lot of guilt on both sides because of the way they have been raised but what is between them is just too strong to deny.

The story is so beautiful and flows so well. There is no rushing into things and the struggles both men face are true to life. Growing up in an Amish community is difficult for some of the youth, especially with all the technology that is around today. The Amish community Isaac belongs to follows the old traditions so they do not even have indoor plumbing or electricity and the head of their community is a hard man. Guilt seems to be used to keep many in line and I know that is how it is for a lot of people who are very religious no matter what type of religion they follow. Isaac would be shunned if his family found out he is gay, that is considered a worse sin then using a telephone or trying alcohol like some of the youth have done. Isaac and David know that the only way to be together is to leave but that isn’t an easy choice, especially for David who doesn’t want to leave his mother and sisters alone.

I really enjoyed John Solo’s narration. I am disappointed when one of my favorite books is put on audio and the narrator does it no justice but that was not the case here. I hope the next two books come out in audio soon. The narration with Keira’s stellar writing was a perfect combination.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • TLD
  • 2019-09-26

Original,creative,captivating,engrossing

The author explores gay invisibility in a dour world of disapproving Amish. Isaac and his fellow sect members in Minnesota have never seen a mirror "the devil's plaything," which encourages vanity. Nor have they spoken on phones, seen TV, films or read non-scripture books. What if one of them is gay, same as the 4% of people in the Western world? The story explores the characters in this environment, the attempt to establish love despite its danger and the effect of this vacuum life on different men.
I loved it & can't wait to listen to the remaining audiobooks in the series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Zell Oakley
  • 2019-11-08

I'd recommend the kindle version

I approached this novel with trepidation, because I was sort of afraid it would end up being like those ridiculous Harlequin Amish romances you see at the bookstore where the biggest conflict is whether Hortencia's new dress shows off her bosom too much (spoiler alert: it does) and whether Ichabod will mind (he won't). So I was pleasantly surprised at the depth of research Keira Andrews did. Everything seemed (to me) to be authentic and believable, and the characters were well drawn and fully realized. It's beautifully written, really.

Which is why it's a shame that, at least in my opinion, the narrator was all wrong. Actually, he was fine except two very major points. The first is that his voice for Isaac, the main character, was timid, shaky, and not at all masculine. Isaac seemed to be on the verge of bursting into tears every time he opened his mouth, and I found myself not liking him. The narrator's voice for David was fine, and managed to convey emotion without histrionics, so I'm not sure what happened with Isaac. The second issue is the non-dialogue narration, which was good most of the time, but, especially when there was any emotion involved, tended to go over-the-top and giddy or maudlin. The sex scenes were awkward because the narrator almost sounded like he was narrating a children's book, it was that phony sounding to me.

But I still kept coming back because I liked the story, in fact I purchased and finished all three books in the series that are available on Audible. And just to test, I purchased the first and the third books on kindle and read them, and I was pleasantly surprised to find that Isaac was not excessively weepy nor even particularly weak. So It was definitely the narration that conveyed this.

So I'd recommend reading the kindle version, but I would DEFINITELY recommend it, because, again, the story is good. If you must buy the audiobook version, your experience may vary from mine (a lot of other people seemed to like Solo's narration, so what do I know, apparently?), but having both listened to and read the book separately I'd say that the kindle is the way to go.