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Every Drop of Blood

Hatred and Healing at Lincoln's Second Inauguration
Written by: Edward Achorn
Narrated by: Adam Barr
Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins

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Publisher's Summary

A brilliantly conceived and vividly drawn story - Washington, D.C. on the eve of Abraham Lincoln’s historic second inaugural address as the lens through which to understand all the complexities of the Civil War

By March 4, 1865, the Civil War had slaughtered more than 700,000 Americans and left intractable wounds on the nation. After a morning of rain-drenched fury, tens of thousands crowded Washington’s Capitol grounds that day to see Abraham Lincoln take the oath for a second term. As the sun emerged, Lincoln rose to give perhaps the greatest inaugural address in American history, stunning the nation by arguing, in a brief 701 words, that both sides had been wrong, and that the war’s unimaginable horrors - every drop of blood spilled - might well have been God’s just verdict on the national sin of slavery. 

Edward Achorn reveals the nation’s capital on that momentous day - with its mud, sewage, and saloons, its prostitutes, spies, reporters, social-climbing spouses and power-hungry politicians - as a microcosm of all the opposing forces that had driven the country apart. A host of characters, unknown and famous, had converged on Washington - from grievously wounded Union colonel Selden Connor in a Washington hospital and the embarrassingly drunk new vice president, Andrew Johnson, to poet-journalist Walt Whitman; from soldiers’ advocate Clara Barton and African-American leader and Lincoln critic-turned-admirer Frederick Douglass (who called the speech “a sacred effort”) to conflicted actor John Wilkes Booth - all swirling around the complex figure of Lincoln. 

In indelible scenes, Achorn vividly captures the frenzy in the nation’s capital at this crucial moment in America’s history and the tension-filled hope and despair afflicting the country as a whole, soon to be heightened by Lincoln's assassination. His story offers new understanding of our great national crisis, and echoes down the decades to resonate in our own time. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.  

©2020 by Edward Achorn. Recorded by arrangement with Atlantic Monthly Press, an imprint of Grove Atlantic, Inc. (P)2020 Audible, Inc.

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  • Dr. Bill- Northern NJ-USA
  • 2020-03-06

After 155 Years- History Repeats Itself

The research put into this book is unbelievable!
It is very apparent today that after 155 years the Confederate South has still NOT recovered from their loss. White Supremacy is still showing its ugly side!

3 people found this helpful

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  • I read everything
  • 2020-03-25

Tremendous

The stories of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War are always so amazing and pertinent to modern America in so many ways. Great reading performance by Mr. Barr.
Thank you it was very enjoyable

2 people found this helpful

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  • Stanowski
  • 2020-05-24

Impossible navigation

Trying for now to get to where I left off reading the sample. Want to listen from that point to the audible which I purchased. ???????

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  • BK
  • 2020-05-23

An extraordinary work of history

Extremely well-done history of the speech itself and the many threads of history of history that led up to it: the war itself (of course), the public perceptions of Lincoln (surprisingly crude and unforgiving), the people and their experiences (an extraordinary assembly that includes, in part, Walt Whitman tending to wounded soldiers in the hospitals; John Wilkes Booth, seething through DC and elsewhere and tending a secret romance with the daughter of a sitting American senator; Salmon P. Chase, haughty and ambitious, and his striking daughter, Kate; Ulysses Grant; foreign dignitaries; and many, many others, famous, infamous, and forgotten); the angry politics of the time and the diverse ways in which Lincoln's in which Lincoln's proclamations and speeches were received; the muddy streets of DC, filled with enormous numbers of people, on the day the speech was give; the thousands of people standing in line to enter the White House to shake Lincoln's hand... It is a rich tapestry, and Achorn is adept at tracing each thread in a very accessible and engaging way.

Adam Barr's narration was very good -- perfect pace, tone, and enunciation.

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  • Richard
  • 2020-05-15

What a Moving Story!!

I so enjoyed listening to this great book! The main story of Lincoln’s Second Inauguration and events surrounding it is dramatic enough. But what makes this book come alive is all the incidental stories that are woven into the tapestry. The story of Walt Whitman and his care for wounded soldiers, the story of Clara Barton’s brother, the sad ending to the lives of rivals Mary Todd Lincoln and Kate Chase Sprague, the friendship between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, and the interesting account of Seldon Connor, who was wounded in battle, but lived to serve his country and state for years, all of these and more make this a memorable book indeed. Both the author and narrator were new to me, but I will look forward to hearing from both of them in many more books. Highly recommended!

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  • Ande
  • 2020-05-10

Loved it.

I was so surprised because I thought it might be dry. But there a a lot in the book I didn’t know. The most fascinating was Abraham Lincoln’s awful childhood, the relationship with Frederick Douglas’s and the President’s sadness was so heartbreaking. I really enjoyed it.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 2020-05-03

Good not great.

Topic great. Performance is fine. But at times, the story seems to allude to today's headlines not those of the 1860s. Hence a distraction, offering nothing to the meaning of the story being told.

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  • Lynn A. Carpenter
  • 2020-04-28

Emotional description of Lincoln and Civil War

powerful portrait of Lincoln emotional development particularly during presidency and civil war. Different from other history.

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  • Mitch Keesling
  • 2020-04-25

Absolutely a lot of crap!

How sad you must be that the Democratic Union Army lost the war at the hands of a Republican North. Are you also thinking slavery a good thing? If I were allowed to give 0 stars I would have.

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  • K
  • 2020-04-24

Excellent!

I have read other historical works on Lincoln and visited DC, Gettysburg, etc. and I was riveted listening to this in-depth reconstruction of people and events recounted in this work. It is fascinating, immensely interesting, and educational!
I am sure I will listen to it again!