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Publisher's Summary

A Reese’s Book Club Pick and instant New York Times best seller

"Often hilarious and ultimately very touching." (People)

"Have you ever read a book that made you want to hug the author?" (Reese Witherspoon)

"This unrestrained memoir is a transporting experience and one of the most startlingly hopeful books I have ever read." (Lisa Taddeo, New York Times best-selling author of Three Women)

The refreshingly original debut memoir of a guarded, over-achieving, self-lacerating young lawyer who reluctantly agrees to get psychologically and emotionally naked in a room of six complete strangers - her psychotherapy group - and in turn finds human connection, and herself.

Christie Tate had just been named the top student in her law school class and finally had her eating disorder under control. Why, then, was she driving through Chicago fantasizing about her own death? Why was she envisioning putting an end to the isolation and sadness that still plagued her despite her achievements?

Enter Dr. Rosen, a therapist who calmly assures her that if she joins one of his psychotherapy groups, he can transform her life. All she has to do is show up and be honest. About everything - her eating habits, childhood, sexual history, and more. Christie is skeptical, insisting that that she is defective, beyond cure. But Dr. Rosen issues a nine-word prescription that will change everything: "You don’t need a cure. You need a witness."

So begins her entry into the strange, terrifying, and ultimately life-changing world of group therapy. Christie is initially put off by Dr. Rosen’s outlandish directives, but as her defenses break down and she comes to trust Dr. Rosen and to depend on the sessions and the prescribed nightly phone calls with various group members, she begins to understand what it means to connect.

Group is a deliciously addictive listen, and with Christie as our guide - skeptical of her own capacity for connection and intimacy, but hopeful in spite of herself - we are given a front row seat to the daring, exhilarating, painful, and hilarious journey that is group therapy - an under-explored process that breaks you down, and then reassembles you so that all the pieces finally fit.

©2020 Christie Tate. All rights reserved. (P)2020 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

What listeners say about Group

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  • Brandi
  • 2020-11-02

Too explicit

Although I appreciate her honesty about therapy and getting treatment, the sexual references were too explicit for me personally. I felt like this was more of a book about sex therapy with the constant descriptions of her intimate life. While the book is good for normalizing taboo topics, might be too much for some people.

9 people found this helpful

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  • Kayla Okarski
  • 2020-10-29

Unrealistic and Unethical

**if you are considering therapy yourself please avoid reading Group. I read 2/3 of Group and dnf. I personally am in group therapy and have a lot of concerns with this book. Tate’s recount of therapy seems exaggerated, unrealistic, and unethical. In her first session she is articulating her feelings and goals with such detail. For someone who has trouble connecting with other people and doesn’t open up to anyone, it seems completely unbelievable that she would be so vulnerable 5 minutes into her first session. **You don’t need to know why you’re unhappy or what your goals are to start therapy. Then, she’s placed into a group where their therapist gives them crazy assignments (ie commands). For example, he tells Tate to tell a classmate that she is a “cock tease.” My therapist would never “command” me to do anything, let alone the crazy things this therapist tells his patients to do. The therapist also has absolutely no respect for confidentiality. I read that people in this book were unhappy with Tate sharing their personal stories, and two years ago she was in the news when her child asked her to take their personal info off her blog and she refused. All because her therapist taught her that secrets are not meant to be kept.

7 people found this helpful

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  • Robyn Som
  • 2020-11-03

Depressing

OMG could this book be any more depressing?!?! Starting with the very 1st chapter nothing but I want to kill myself, I'm a bulimic, my family doesn't understand me, I can't find a boyfriend, I'm friendless...and on and on. No thank you. After 3 chapters of this I'm returning it and would not recommend it to anyone.

6 people found this helpful

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  • Tracey B.
  • 2020-11-09

no no no

I couldn't even get past the first chapter as the narration was booooring. Save your credit.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Megan M.
  • 2020-11-12

Horrible narration

I’ve heard great things about this book, and may try it in print. The narration was so flat, I didn’t make it beyond the first chapter.

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  • B
  • 2020-11-10

Better on Paper

After reading Maybe You Should Talk to Someone (a must read) I was interested in therapy non fiction so I tried this book out. The narration is terrible, I thought I’d be excited to hear the author read her own words but, it’s comes across like a bad actors struggling to place emotions to a monologue. I’m sure she’s a decent writer but she was not made to narrate an audiobook. Maybe but the book if you’re interested but, definitely don’t get the audio book. Wasted credit.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Jennifer Monsour
  • 2020-10-31

Amazing in every way!

Christie’s story made me laugh out loud and cry tears of sadness, frustration, and joy. Such a beautiful story of healing through the power of human connection, vulnerability, love, support and friendship.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 2020-10-31

Good Listen

Candid, open, brave. Really enjoyed following the authors journey and progress to finding meaningful connection.

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  • H. Kirchbach
  • 2020-11-22

Great memoir in the author‘s own voice !

I like a good memoir and one read in the author’s own voice is even better. I listened to this one because it was the Reese‘s bookclub November pick and I am glad I did ! Christie is a law student battling with an eating disorder and intimacy issues and finally decides to take the plunge and start therapy. She is recommended Dr Rosen by one of her friends and she goes to meet him and he drops a bombshell: she must join group therapy. I have to admit, at this point I would have jumped ship if I were Christie. The thought of group therapy scares the hell out of me. Christie had a similar uneasy feeling, but decided to go for it and I'm so glad she did because...well, you will have to read it to find out! The group Christie joins (plus the later ones) have one key rule: no secrets. Patients openly discuss each others' private lives both in group and out as a way of releasing shame and building intimacy. Some of the things Christie had to share was very intimate and I'm not sure how she did it, but it was fascinating.

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  • chantal
  • 2020-11-20

Glad she matured... but what a journey!!

I listened during my commute. I'm not sure I could've read it. I struggle with dealing with emotionally unsteady people so thank goodness for people like her Dr. Rosen!