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How to Die

An Ancient Guide to the End of Life
Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
Length: 2 hrs and 29 mins
Categories: Classics, Greek & Roman
4 out of 5 stars (13 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"It takes an entire lifetime to learn how to die", wrote the Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca (c. 4 BC-65 AD). He counseled readers to "study death always", and took his own advice, returning to the subject again and again in all his writings, yet he never treated it in a complete work. How to Die gathers in one volume, for the first time, Seneca's remarkable meditations on death and dying. Edited and translated by James S. Romm, How to Die reveals a provocative thinker and dazzling writer who speaks with a startling frankness about the need to accept death or even, under certain conditions, to seek it out.

Seneca believed that life is only a journey toward death and that one must rehearse for death throughout life. Here, he tells us how to practice for death, how to die well, and how to understand the role of a good death in a good life. He stresses the universality of death, its importance as life's final rite of passage, and its ability to liberate us from pain, slavery, or political oppression.

Featuring beautifully rendered new translations, How to Die also includes an enlightening introduction, notes, the original Latin texts, and an epilogue presenting Tacitus's description of Seneca's grim suicide.

Introduced, edited, and translated by James S. Romm

©2018 Princeton University Press (P)2018 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good summary of a stoic on death

Collation of Seneca's writing on death. There are some useful ideas though it does get somewhat repetitive.

Heavy focus on quality of life over length of life.

Would NOT reccomend reading during tough times in your life. Seneca heavily advocates rash choices.

Seneca was not a madman nor a supporter of Nero (despite being his teacher -- Nero was not a good learner).

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Fascinating look into a madman

A compelling look into a madman. You could literally see him walking with Nero in his gardens watching people burn alive and enjoying their pain.You can see this philosophy leads to with the thousands of corpses. Absolutely fascinating.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • kyle miller
  • 2018-11-28

The reading is somewhat flat.

His voice can be somewhat dull and boring at times, however it was still a good purchase.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Jon
  • Rio de Janeiro
  • 2019-10-23

Awful narration

The narrator speaks like Google's TTS, ruined it for me. Also, as the audio book lacks the Latin it is consequently very brief. Having been reading and rereading Seneca for years I know that he had an awful lot more to say about death and suicide which has been omitted from this book. Also, his tradegies are not included which included some great lines, such as "Greedy for life is he, who refuses to die, along with the dying world". Why couldn't these quotes and many like them been added to an appendix? Romm is a great translator, and his book 'Dying Every Day: Seneca in the court of Nero' is fantastic. Just a shame he hasn't included more passages from Seneca in this book. The hardcover might be good for those who are new to Seneca and just want a taste of Seneca's views on death and suicide, but not really suitable for seasoned readers of Seneca. This audiobook was really let down by the narration though, irritating at times.

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  • Shodan
  • 2018-09-20

A solid narrative performance!

Most clear intonation, although full of nuances. A true classic, both in content and execution.