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Hunters of Dune

Narrated by: Scott Brick
Series: Dune Saga, Book 18, Dune 7, Book 1
Length: 20 hrs and 22 mins
4.3 out of 5 stars (10 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Based directly on Frank Herbert's final outline, which lay hidden in a safe-deposit box for a decade, Hunters of Dune will finally answer the urgent questions Dune fans have been debating for two decades.

At the end of Frank Herbert's final novel, Chapterhouse: Dune, a ship carrying a crew of refugees escapes into the uncharted galaxy, fleeing from a terrifying, mysterious Enemy. Hunters of Dune is the exotic odyssey of the crew as it is forced to elude the diabolical traps set by the ferocious, unknown Enemy. To strengthen their forces, the fugitives have used genetic technology to revive key figures from Dune's past, including Paul Muad'Dib and Lady Jessica, so their special talents will challenge those thrown at them.

Failure is unthinkable. Not only is their survival at stake, but they hold the fate of the entire human race in their hands.

©2006 Herbert Properties LLC (P)2006 Audio Renaissance

What listeners say about Hunters of Dune

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

A Much Needed Conclusion to the Original Saga

Both this book and its follow-up, Sandworms of Dune sorely lack the intelligence and nuance of the original saga written by Frank Herbert. Still, this should not be taken as a dismissal of these works so much as a recognition of the genius of the original books. Both Hunters of Dune and Sandworms of Dune should be seen as a very honest effort to bring a much needed conclusion to the venerable Dune saga. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson deliver this through an adequate narrative, which, the audiobook producers have in turn rendered convincingly and effectively. Honestly, it takes an intentional effort to nitpick the weak points of these books against the originals, so it's very possible to enjoy them for what they are. In my humble opinion, both expanded universe books are essential to go through for first time readers/listeners of the Dune saga.

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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • James
  • 2006-09-14

If only I liked Dune a little less...

Hunters of Dune feels like a continuation of the Legends of Dune series rather than the original six Dune novels. The general story is fairly interesting, but the individual subplots and characters lack the important subtleties of Frank's original series. For fanatics of Dune, this is a must-read glimpse into Frank's vision for the direction of the series.

Unfortunately, even the authors admit in the introduction they could never match his writing abilities. Personally, I wish Brian Herbert would simply publish the all of the notes and outlines that Frank and quit writing Dune books.

There were several issues that kept me from giving this more stars. Among them include:

* Scott Brick reads this book with a melodramatic tone (think William Shatner parody).

* Each chapter was too short; just as the plot picked up, the authors changed to a different plot.

* Many of the characters were underdeveloped and lacked the subtle details that really humanized the characters.

* Too much time was spent reviewing all of the "prequels". In the first 4 hours, at least 2 hours was spent repeating material from prior books.

* Authors go out of their way to include material from their spin-off books, even at the expense of logical or common sense.

* The book is written to a 7th grade level. Harry Potter has a more advanced vocabulary and sophisticated plot.

* Some sections feel "padded" to stretch the story out to fill two novels. There's a sequel due out next year.

* Authors use bad plot devices and cliched techniques to create suspense and drama: to create a misguided sense of danger, they use a vague third-person reference like "the pit boss" or "the Reverend Mother"; that's a dead give-away that it's not who you think it is.

* Bad analogies and too much flair in descriptions.

* Authors lack subtleties. Compare Frank Herbert's style of refering to about axolotl tanks with Brian/Kevin's style. I feel no disgust or revulsion when listening to B/K.

44 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Hebetude
  • 2017-10-10

Let it end with Chapterhouse Dune

Narrator was great.

They claim to have used a trove of notes from Frank Herbert to write the two Dune 7 books.


The only way that's true is if they scrawled their garbage over Frank's notes to conserve paper.

The Golden Path becomes your generic "savior unites humanity for the final showdown" rather than a continuous process preventing mankind from stagnating, there's no way their interpretation of the Butlerian Jihad came from Frank, people randomly pop into shared memory for no reason even though that's not how any of this works.

I'm just going to pretend none of this ever happened; the series ended with Chapterhouse.

13 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • KAZ Vorpal, aka Michael Karl
  • 2016-09-15

Melodramatic Reader

The book is worth reading solely to glean some idea of what Herbert might have intended for the rest of his brilliant series.

But the reader is so bad that, if I had the time, I'd go back to reading it myself. He reads with emphasis not only melodramatic, but constantly chosen incorrectly. He often picks words to emphasize that are not the ones the meaning and context of the phrase require.

But the most important flaw is the former...every sentence is over-enunciated, read with the emphasis of a catastrophic emergency, a climactic emotion, as if it were terribly important, even if it's trivial.

The reader might imagine this makes the story exciting, but it does the opposite. The listener becomes desensitized to the anticlimactic melodrama. The constant urgency leaves one not feeling which parts actually should have carried what emotion. It's painfully awkward, eventually unpleasantly boring.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Shawn P
  • 2017-08-29

oh boy...

Childish, shallow, non-regal characters. No minutiae or plans-within-plans-within-plans. Scott Brick did the best he could.

10 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • James
  • 2006-09-04

The lost dialog of Dune

Although an interesting listen (I give it about 3.5 stars), I found Hunters of Dune to be more a description of what has occured than a re-enactment. I fealt removed rather than immersed in the story. For Dune fans, I expect it will be worth the listen. If you are new to Dune, this is not a good place to start. I miss dialog and interaction.

11 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Jonathan
  • 2009-07-11

I hate to rate it like this, but....

Frank Herbert's genius will never be matched or even emulated successfully. Granted, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson gave the disclaimer in the beginning that they wouldn't be able to match it, but several times there were some really weak emulations that just made me angry, like the way the word 'generous' was used in previous books, it's like they threw it in just for a bit of nostalgia. I agree with one of the other reviewers here, that the original outline of Frank Herbert's should be released in unedited form.
I don't have anything to back this up, but this book seemed to be wholly written by Kevin J. Anderson, read the 'Saga of the Seven Suns' series and you'll see what I mean, his personal style is all over this. Unfortunately, for me this has been such a clash in writing styles that I can barely make it through this book. I hope the original manuscripts/outlines will be published in full someday.

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Sarah B
  • 2020-06-04

Lower your expectations

If you like the use of the word “whore,” awkward exposition, intelligent characters who have to randomly be stupid for the plot to move foreword, meandering subplots that go nowhere, simple things being over-explained, and random changes to established cannon for no apparent reason, this is the book for you. I really wanted to like this. The end of “Chapterhouse” absolutely needed a follow-up, but this is disappointing to the point of frustration. This was written in 2006... I don’t understand how some of the choices made for this book made it past editors.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • C
  • 2020-01-17

Not Good

Scott Brick is such a bad fit for this genre. He is ridiculously melodramatic. It almost seems like a joke. Brian and Kevin don't really seem to get Frank Herbert's characters well enough. Some motivations and dialogues are out of place for Frank's characters or people groups. I actually couldn't finish it. Maybe the last half gets better, but I just couldn't take the dumbed down writing, conflicts to the original material and terrible narration.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Kevin
  • 2007-10-12

mediocre writing terrible reading

Definitely down hill from the first issues in the "new dune" saga, which were well written and a great listen. This is vapid stuff and the reading is really atrocious! Brick ruins the experience with a level of melodrama that just had me retching. I mean must every single sentance and paragraph have an 'end of the world' urgency? And they are all read with the same intonation.

I listened to the entire book anyhow, just to see if it got any better. This is a very lonnnnng book to listen through with not very much happening. Plot development: long, boring, and weak. Character development: I did not develop empathy with a single character.

Maybe Sandworms will make it worthwhile, but I don't think I can stomach the reading.

11 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Christopher Hansen
  • 2017-11-08

Disappointed

I'm a huge fan of Dune, and have read every book (except this one, which I listened to). I really wanted to like this story. Overall, very disappointing. The story attempts to re/hash previous characterization, plots and storylines to onboard new readers who haven't consumed previous novels - and this is ultimately boring for the seasoned customer. At the same time, the authors make vast assumptions about listeners knowledge of the Dune universe. The net effect is that both new and old listeners are left unfulfilled.

Plot developments drags incessantly, and doesn't improve, even after reaching the 12 hour mark.

Narration is not compelling enough to carry the lack of plot or storyline. The voice characterization was...not impressive.

The Ghola theme as it is applied really doesn't produce any genuine interest that is sustainable.

I'll finish the listening but this feels like a novel with a 500 page prelude. Yawn

4 people found this helpful