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Publisher's Summary

The tragic and resonant story of the disappearance of eight men - the victims of serial killer Bruce McArthur - from Toronto's queer community.

In 2013, the Toronto Police Service announced that the disappearances of three men - Skandaraj Navaratnam, Abdulbasir Faizi, and Majeed Kayhan - from Toronto's gay village were, perhaps, linked. When the leads ran dry, the investigation was shut down, on paper classified as "open but suspended". 

By 2015, investigative journalist Justin Ling had begun to retrace investigators' steps, convinced there was evidence of a serial killer. Meanwhile, more men would go missing, and police would continue to deny that there was a threat to the community. On January 18, 2018, Bruce McArthur, a landscaper, would be arrested on suspicion of first-degree murder. In February 2019, he was sentenced to life in prison for the murders of eight men.     

This extraordinary book tells the complete story of the McArthur murders. Based on more than five years of in-depth reporting, this is also a story of police failure, of how the queer community responded, and the story of the eight men who went missing and the lives they left behind. In telling that story, Justin Ling uncovers the latent homophobia and racism that kept this case unsolved and unseen. This gripping book reveals how police agencies across the country fail to treat missing persons cases seriously and how policies and laws, written at every level of government, pushed McArthur's victims out of the light and into the shadows.

©2020 Justin Ling (P)2020 Penguin Random House Canada

What listeners say about Missing from the Village

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So Much More Than True Crime

Justin Ling does an excellent job as the narrator of his book. Really, no one else could have done it. Ling's research and passion for this book are evident. He forgoes the sensationalism and instead provides a history of the persecution of queer people living in Toronto over the years and how that very persecution allowed a serial killer to prey on his victims. An important and affecting listen.

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Incredible

Sheds light on the many injustices that took place in the disappearance of the men from Toronto’s Gay Village, and points a direct spotlight at areas where our justice system as well as social systems allow for minorities to fall to the way side.

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🤨

Justin should've been a cop, all cold cases would be solved. Didnt he solve this one!?

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Captivating

Really enjoyed this! Excellent writing style, captivating. Great narration. I followed this story but didn’t have all the details about the victims, it was good to hear more about the people behind the horrific acts. Also interesting to hear some of the history attached to the community.

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  • Sherri Smith
  • 2021-04-16

Great storytelling!

The author did an incredible job narrating this book. He also did a terrific job of writing it. It’s so sad that this killer didn’t get caught sooner and equally sad that the queer community gets treated with such disdain. There were about 5 skips in the editing (I assume) that some words were lost. I still highly recommend this book.