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Party of One

The Loners' Manifesto
Written by: Anneli Rufus
Narrated by: Therese Plummer
Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
5 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

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Publisher's Summary

The Buddha. Rene Descartes. Emily Dickinson. Greta Garbo. Bobby Fischer. J. D. Salinger: Loners, all - along with as many as 25 percent of the world's population. Loners keep to themselves, and like it that way. Yet in the press, in films, in folklore, and nearly everywhere one looks, loners are tagged as losers and psychopaths, perverts and pity cases, ogres and mad bombers, elitists and wicked witches. Too often, loners buy into those messages and strive to change, making themselves miserable in the process by hiding their true nature - and hiding from it. Loners as a group deserve to be reassessed - to claim their rightful place, rather than be perceived as damaged goods that need to be "fixed." 

In Party of One Anneli Rufus - a prize-winning, critically acclaimed writer with talent to burn - has crafted a morally urgent, historically compelling tour de force - a long-overdue argument in defense of the loner, then and now. Marshalling a polymath's easy erudition to make her case, assembling evidence from every conceivable arena of culture as well as interviews with experts and loners worldwide and her own acutely calibrated analysis, Rufus rebuts the prevailing notion that aloneness is indistinguishable from loneliness, the fallacy that all of those who are alone don't want to be, and wouldn't be, if only they knew how.

©2008 Anneli Rufus (P)2018 Hachette Audio

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  • MYCatSimba
  • 2020-03-14

Terrible book, but the narrator is pretty good.

A manifesto is a declaration of a policy people should adopt, so maybe Rufus is being cheeky with the title, but if a listener actually thinks that this author is making a good case for the life of a loner, you are going to have a long and hard road ahead of you. Ask yourself, is all her negativity, and disdain for human beings have anything to do with being a loner? If you are on the loner's journey isn't it clear that you are solely responsible for your own mind, and outlook on life. If you break away from group thinking, and spend a great deal of time alone wouldn't you make an effort to stay positive? You can not live alone with the same kind of hate the author has for people. I actually feel a responsibility to tell anyone that listens to this book to not adopt the pathetic ideology of Party of one. There is nothing wrong with being a loner, but remember why you are different. You are seeing the world with all of the issues and want to be left alone. Why would you then bring all that judgement, and frustration with you on your solo journey? This author destroys her own argument in this book with her own perspective on being a loner! This author thinks she is superior to everyone, and never once shows a change in her attitude. Her issue is all this judgement on others turns back onto herself when she is alone, and that's why she struggles with self-hate in her other book Unworthy. Seriously, you are better off just skipping this load of garbage, but you could also give it a listen and see what I am talking about here. Take everything with a grain of salt, and think for yourself if you buy this book. This could be a good lesson on how ignorant even a sophisticated award winning writer can be on an entire subject. She eloquently describes nearly every loner in history, and yet fails to make a valid argument for her position.