Get a free audiobook

Pretty Boy

Written by: Orson Scott Card
Narrated by: Scott Brick
Length: 47 mins
5 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

CDN$ 14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

How do you systematically destroy a child with love? It's not something that any parent aspires to do, yet a surprising number come perilously close to achieving it.So begins Orson Scott Card's new story from the Ender Universe, a profound meditation on parents and offspring focusing on the childhood of one of Ender's Battle School challengers, Bonzo Madrid, and the circumstances that lead him to his unique place in the Game. Read by a frequent visitor to Ender's world, Scott Brick.
©2006 Orson Scott Card (P)2006 Orson Scott Card

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
No reviews are available
Sort by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • C. F Fulbright
  • 2007-05-23

Goes Nowhere

I was very disappointed by this short story. I thought it would give some insight into how Bonzo Madrid turned out the way he did. Nope. It had almost nothing to do with the Ender saga, other than IF personnel dropping in for a sentence every now and then. It didn't even address the teaser description, which implied that "loving a child so much" was bad for him, presumably spoiling him. There was no indication in this story that Bonzo was spoiled.

What was Orson Scott Card thinking when he wrote and released this?

22 of 24 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Brandon Lee Hansen
  • 2018-09-09

the sorry was good, but short

not worth a $15 credit. should be part of meat shorts. I thought I was getting a whole book

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Bickford
  • 2019-03-01

Waste of time and money

This only covers one aspect of bonzo's childhood, and leaves many questions unanswered about how he came to be such a horrible commander, and such a despicable human being. I regret having purchased this title. The only positive thing is Scott Brick's narration, which is fantastic as always.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Kindle Customer
  • 2018-08-14

Interesting, but somewhat lacking

It was a compelling insight into bonzo but I wish there had been slightly more there. It was somewhat anticlimactic. Overall pretty good, but the story needed another little something that made it worthwhile.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Rachel Gherardi
  • 2018-03-31

Strange subject matter

Was good but not really about "doting parents". Strange subject matter but good backstory of a side character in the Enderverse.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jammie
  • 2011-12-06

That OSC is certainly a clever man.

What did you like best about this story?

In “Children of the Mind” and now again in “Pretty Boy” OSC has a way of turning villains into real, almost likeable people.

Any additional comments?

I have despised Bonzo Madrid since I was 12. He was mean to Ender...Ender, whom I love! What’s not to hate about the guy? It is interesting to have my mind changed all these years later.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Miranda
  • 2010-07-19

An Enjoyable Story

As I considered purchasing this audio book I was confronted by two previous and completely contrasting reviews, so I decided it was best to simply trust that Orson Scott Card would deliver another engaging and beautiful story, regardless of its relevance (or lack thereof) to his 'Ender' series.

The first line of the story is not obviously linked to the developments of the plot as such, and one can also make few assumptions about the story by scrutinising the title illustration. Without its link the the Ender universe, this story would probably not get so much attention, and I myself would not have chosen to listen if it weren't for my trust in the author's ability.

Nevertheless, 'Pretty Boy' is a sweet and beautifully written tale of a child trying to make sense of an adult world. The concept is not remarkably original, but Orson Scott Card's unique style and description of his protagonist's reasoning and thought processes makes it well worth a listen.

Scott Brick surprisingly pulls off the Spanish accent for the characters and reads with appropriate expression, invoking emotion without diminishing it through melodrama.

Not uplifting as such, but very pleasant tale.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • FORMER Kindle Customer
  • 2019-03-14

Manipulation of children based on human nature

Beauty on the outside opens doors to opportunities much easier than for average kids. Where this makes the greatest difference is in access to conversations and events that provide information verbally, through body language, and written (pictures and digital as well as paper).

But it is the visual and emotional contacts that are the best indicators of the processes of thoughts into ideas and reactions. Little patterns and what is not discussed is usually the most important message. Greatness is not ego based except in one's own mind. It is action and results based, often with appropriate time and distance delays.

If you are to close, you will not see the star gone Nova as you are destroyed too soon. Thousands of light-years away, it indicates a major event in the past. But now the history may not be discoverable.

What is significant about a kid maybe selected for International Fleet training? The development of awareness and predictability based on his choices after analysis of input information and past history. Being able to observe the analysis and reactions of learning in real time in a safe environment is a good indicator of future analysis methods and reactions AND trainability

Will this become the main recruitment method for space officers? There is a high probability. Yet the traditional way of generalized training followed by specialized training, then working up through the ranks will always be the old school method and preferred by the older officers. But space travel is very different, much more complicated, and requires much more knowledge and shorter reaction times.

Who wants a 13 year old kid becoming your superior officer at any level, but especially after working your way up for 50 years only to be blocked on future promotions by kids with no real experience except specialized computer games? That may be the toughest nut to crack to achieve compatibility. Even if cloni g of the best is used, it is limited. Artificial intelligence may work, but it will always lack the key component of humans that is also missing in cloning: variability.

People, even kids, have differences that make looking at a situational problem slightly different for each person. Differences in experience, education, friends, genes, health, relationships and many other variables provide different choices to analyze beyond the standard textbook recommendation.

I would rather a trained person on site make the final decision over a computer processor PROGRAMED for whatever the programmers far away and long ago determined as necessary to be included in developing an action plan for future unknown with unknown variables.

And if at some point computers can outdo human thought processes and humans are no longer needed? We become a huge burden on computer world's versus the limited requirements of the computers!

So why would computers keep people around?

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2018-12-02

wow<br />

the story may have been short, but I did not expect that to happen to Madrid. in Enders Game you seem to be much of a jerk, now hearing his back story I can understand why he became the way he was towards Ender.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Wayne
  • 2017-06-01

BONZO<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />I expected that his whole story would<br /><br /><br />


I expected the story to be told all the way to his death like other characters.