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Publisher's Summary

Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google are the four most influential companies on the planet.

Just about everyone thinks they know how they got there.

Just about everyone is wrong.

For all that's been written about the Four over the last two decades, no one has captured their power and staggering success as insightfully as Scott Galloway.

Instead of buying the myths these companies broadcast, Galloway asks fundamental questions. How did the Four infiltrate our lives so completely that they're almost impossible to avoid (or boycott)? Why does the stock market forgive them for sins that would destroy other firms? And as they race to become the world's first trillion-dollar company, can anyone challenge them?

In the same irreverent style that has made him one of the world's most celebrated business professors, Galloway deconstructs the strategies of the Four that lurk beneath their shiny veneers. He shows how they manipulate the fundamental emotional needs that have driven us since our ancestors lived in caves, at a speed and scope others can't match. And he reveals how you can apply the lessons of their ascent to your own business or career.

Whether you want to compete with them, do business with them, or simply live in the world they dominate, you need to understand the Four.

©2017 Scott Galloway (P)2017 Penguin Audio

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What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Unsettling

Non bias, unsettling truth about the companies that surround our current lives and careers. Will share with my team and colleagues.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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An Unexpected Treat

I picked up this audiobook solely based on its cover, thinking it would be interesting to learn about the world’s most iconic companies. The history of “the four horsemen”, as the author calls them, is only a part of the story. The other half of the book, the better half in my opinion, is when the author compares the horsemen with other seemingly successful businesses like Uber and Airbnb. He closes with suggestions on how a budding entrepreneur can make adjustments in their work life to build a better career. This is a great book!

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the worst book I have ever read/heard

this book offers nothing to the reader, it is a huge rant on everything in the world seems like the author was really depressed in life. he is a renowned business professor but this book sucks. also the reader feels like he is half ready to roll over overall this book is one of the worst things I have read in a long time !! I left listening to it mid way could not continue till the end

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Phenomenal!

The perfect realization of society and our digital age. A must read for anyone interested in tech and just being successful.

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An interesting way to view the big 4 tech giants.

This was a great commentary on the big tech firms and the darker side that is usually not discussed given their tremendous success stories.

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So good

This was so inspiring and through, and as a high school student I recommend this for people of all ages.

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Great read!

Very captivating and great insight into the top four tech companies of our generation. Highly recommend this book in audio form.

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excellent insights on the bleeding edge

a flurry of facts. I would have liked to hear more about how cryptocurrency and Smart Contacts could affect the four.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Brian Schwab
  • 2017-10-27

Funny, informative and current

Great book. Easy read/listen. Very entertaining while providing a ton of useful information, facts and insights. I’m buying four hard copies for my kids.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Patrick
  • 2018-01-19

Pessimistic and narrow minded

If you’re an entrepreneur hoping to learn valuable insights into how “the four” operate... this book will provide them...

However you’re going to have to reverse engineer those insights from all the negative pessimistic things Scott has to say first.

Most information he gives about the companies is punctuated by a personal, narrow minded, judgement about how the companies are “evil” and nearly everything they do is “disrupting jobs” and taking advantage of people.

He’s convinced:

- Virtual Reality is basically the dumbest investment Facebook has ever made
- Robots and AI are going to steal all our jobs
- People only like Apple because they think iPhones will get them laid more

SUMMARY

If you’re and entrepreneur who admires these companies, doesn’t think Steve Jobs was (“an ***hole”, and wants to “make a dent in the universe” ...

Get something else instead.

Suggestions:

- Shoe Dog
- Onward
- The Everything Store
- Steve Jobs
- Elon Musk
- Titan

18 of 21 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 2018-05-13

Read only with a strong stomach

While there is some relevant information to be absorbed here the author seems to have been burdened with an accumulated hatred for the companies and leader which he talks about. If you are allergic to negativity find a better book that provides more practical content.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Joe Walsh
  • 2017-10-16

So Smart and well written!

Galloway has a great voice as a writer. The insights and the data in the book are balanced with humor. Loved the career advice. This is a must read for business professionals.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Melissa Every
  • 2017-11-05

Interesting presentation

Interesting book, amusing presentation. Galloway, is a NYU professor, so misses few opportunities to virtue signal and proselytize his Marxian visions of utopia. What he lacks in understanding of economics, he makes up for in insights on their business. Still, an entertaining listen.

13 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • L
  • 2017-10-22

Good info but obnoxious views

The author lays out interesting facts, but a lot of the story, views, and perspectives are sort of dumb or overly dramatized. I’m only going to finish it to not waste the download.

13 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • James Kaiser
  • 2017-11-03

Great book

Overall a great listen. Good insight into the future “lords” of our economy. I do wish Scott narrated it though.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • M. Kirk DeBaets
  • 2017-10-15

Please, listen to the last two chapters 1st and then decide if you want to continue.

There are a lot of good things to think about here, but there is an anti-trend that runs throughout the book. Great things youth know about, not necessarily to agree with.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Samuel G.
  • 2017-10-13

great perspective and insight

Good read and highly insightful and thoughtfully narrarated. has some directional opinions but for the most part a great read.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • C. R. Hoyle
  • 2017-10-11

Very timely

With these 4 companies dominating so much of American and global life this is a great book to get more familiar with their strategies and goals. Very well written and entertaining.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Pierre Gauthier
  • 2018-02-25

Disorganized and Diappointing!

In this stretched out and longish essay, Scott Galloway, a university professor who has himself dabbled in business, takes on what he calls the four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Amazon, Google, Apple and Facebook.

His style is akin to fireworks with a multitude of strong assertions and striking statistics. Among other things, he has an outlandish fascination with cap value and refers to it again and again, as if the stock market were a dependable indicator of long term trends in economics. Who really cares what firm first reaches the trillion-dollar level?

Consequently, the book’s overall presentation is disorganized, with no consistent train of thought. This is compounded by the fact that the last chapters deal at length with career advice to young business professionals, that has nothing to do with the book’s proclaimed topic.

Professor Galloway is excessively personal and comes out as being overly proud of his present status as guest speaker in multiple events across the world. He spends much time describing elements that have little to do with the book’s topic, for instance his strange endeavour to take over and hollow out the New York Times, among other things by selling its Manhattan headquarters.

Overall, there is no reason to recommend to anyone to invest time and money in this overblown work.