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The Four

The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google
Written by: Scott Galloway
Narrated by: Jonathan Todd Ross
Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
Categories: Business & Money, Commerce
4.5 out of 5 stars (179 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google are the four most influential companies on the planet.

Just about everyone thinks they know how they got there.

Just about everyone is wrong.

For all that's been written about the Four over the last two decades, no one has captured their power and staggering success as insightfully as Scott Galloway.

Instead of buying the myths these companies broadcast, Galloway asks fundamental questions. How did the Four infiltrate our lives so completely that they're almost impossible to avoid (or boycott)? Why does the stock market forgive them for sins that would destroy other firms? And as they race to become the world's first trillion-dollar company, can anyone challenge them?

In the same irreverent style that has made him one of the world's most celebrated business professors, Galloway deconstructs the strategies of the Four that lurk beneath their shiny veneers. He shows how they manipulate the fundamental emotional needs that have driven us since our ancestors lived in caves, at a speed and scope others can't match. And he reveals how you can apply the lessons of their ascent to your own business or career.

Whether you want to compete with them, do business with them, or simply live in the world they dominate, you need to understand the Four.

©2017 Scott Galloway (P)2017 Penguin Audio

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Unsettling

Non bias, unsettling truth about the companies that surround our current lives and careers. Will share with my team and colleagues.

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Review

Most things stated in the book seemed like common knowledge. Was looking for something more insightful.

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waste of time :(

very repetitive_ waste of money _ horrible structure by the author nd reader. one two three u are now free.

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A MUST read for thinkers

This book really got me thinking about the good, the bad, the exciting and the terrifying of what big tech has done to our society.

It is incredibly well written, always interesting with a heavy dose of humour.

He is a natural storyteller with the intelligence and research of a professor. A cool professor though, the type you would see at the student bar hanging with students over a pitcher of cheap beer.

AWESOME read.

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Great read/listen

This book was a great read. The speaker was very fluent and expressive. The book itself was an interesting take on how the companies have really built themselves to where they are now.

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Important reading for today

Eye opening reveal of just how much a plugged in, connected person (myself) doesn’t really know about these behemoths that monopolize both our productive hours and downtime of each day, and how they did so. And where they are headed. Scott is entertaining and acerbic in his wit and storytelling style. Worthwhile buy just for the behind the scenes peak at the battle inside the boardroom at the NY Times he personally went through. I challenge you to rank in order of dollars you spend and time you spend where each of the Four stand in your own life, and then try to forget the metric tons of data they already know about you. Illuminating.

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Insightful

Really interesting reading the different perspective of the 4 big giants - the good and more interesting the bad that people are not fully aware. #Audible1

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Great book

I had high expectations for this book, and it met and exceeded them! Galloway's insight into the business decisions and the thinking of these four influential companies kept me interested beginning to end. #Audible1

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Fascinating perspective

Scott Galloway allows you to look at these tech giants with fresh eyes, giving you a nuanced view of how they got where they are today. It's easy to use their products and services throughout your day without thinking much about the power these companies have over you. Scott shines a light on the power.

 #Audible1

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great book. good insight for a young entrepreneur.

good read/listen overall. the book skirts alot of topics and important facets. Not a deep dive but a great overview. glad I purchased.

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  • Joe Walsh
  • 2017-10-16

So Smart and well written!

Galloway has a great voice as a writer. The insights and the data in the book are balanced with humor. Loved the career advice. This is a must read for business professionals.

14 people found this helpful

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  • "achuith"
  • 2019-06-23

Terrible book

I was hoping for an intelligent, fact-filled book, and instead I got this steaming pile of garbage. The author is full of moral condemnation and outrage, more interested in virtue signaling than telling the stories of these companies and their founders. He seems to be of the Sanders school of thought - capitalism is bad, and the book is littered with words that convey this moral outrage, like theft, con job, etc. I don't understand how this guy is an entrepreneur or a professor in business when he lacks a basic understand of economics. He also goes into this digression about his own experiences as a board member of the NYT, which is interesting, but doesn't belong in this book.

This book will make you more stupid for reading it. I rarely get a refund for a book, but I will get one for this because I cannot stand the idea of this author making any money off of me.

9 people found this helpful

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  • Samuel G.
  • 2017-10-13

great perspective and insight

Good read and highly insightful and thoughtfully narrarated. has some directional opinions but for the most part a great read.

7 people found this helpful

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  • C. R. Hoyle
  • 2017-10-11

Very timely

With these 4 companies dominating so much of American and global life this is a great book to get more familiar with their strategies and goals. Very well written and entertaining.

7 people found this helpful

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  • Patrick
  • 2018-01-19

Pessimistic and narrow minded

If you’re an entrepreneur hoping to learn valuable insights into how “the four” operate... this book will provide them...

However you’re going to have to reverse engineer those insights from all the negative pessimistic things Scott has to say first.

Most information he gives about the companies is punctuated by a personal, narrow minded, judgement about how the companies are “evil” and nearly everything they do is “disrupting jobs” and taking advantage of people.

He’s convinced:

- Virtual Reality is basically the dumbest investment Facebook has ever made
- Robots and AI are going to steal all our jobs
- People only like Apple because they think iPhones will get them laid more

SUMMARY

If you’re and entrepreneur who admires these companies, doesn’t think Steve Jobs was (“an ***hole”, and wants to “make a dent in the universe” ...

Get something else instead.

Suggestions:

- Shoe Dog
- Onward
- The Everything Store
- Steve Jobs
- Elon Musk
- Titan

107 people found this helpful

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  • L
  • 2017-10-22

Good info but obnoxious views

The author lays out interesting facts, but a lot of the story, views, and perspectives are sort of dumb or overly dramatized. I’m only going to finish it to not waste the download.

30 people found this helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 2018-05-13

Read only with a strong stomach

While there is some relevant information to be absorbed here the author seems to have been burdened with an accumulated hatred for the companies and leader which he talks about. If you are allergic to negativity find a better book that provides more practical content.

9 people found this helpful

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  • James Kaiser
  • 2017-11-03

Great book

Overall a great listen. Good insight into the future “lords” of our economy. I do wish Scott narrated it though.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Luis Lopez
  • 2017-10-20

Very insightful. Recommended!

Very insightful set of opinions on "the 4". Made valid, good points and correlations on things we are exposed to everyday, but don't really notice. I will DEFINITELY recommend this book to friends, students and contacts. The narrator was good, although I really expected and was looking forward to hear Professor Galloway in the narration. Probably the best book I have read this year. Kudos to professor Galloway! May there be more!

9 people found this helpful

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  • Brian Schwab
  • 2017-10-27

Funny, informative and current

Great book. Easy read/listen. Very entertaining while providing a ton of useful information, facts and insights. I’m buying four hard copies for my kids.

8 people found this helpful

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  • Pierre Gauthier
  • 2018-02-25

Disorganized and Diappointing!

In this stretched out and longish essay, Scott Galloway, a university professor who has himself dabbled in business, takes on what he calls the four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Amazon, Google, Apple and Facebook.

His style is akin to fireworks with a multitude of strong assertions and striking statistics. Among other things, he has an outlandish fascination with cap value and refers to it again and again, as if the stock market were a dependable indicator of long term trends in economics. Who really cares what firm first reaches the trillion-dollar level?

Consequently, the book’s overall presentation is disorganized, with no consistent train of thought. This is compounded by the fact that the last chapters deal at length with career advice to young business professionals, that has nothing to do with the book’s proclaimed topic.

Professor Galloway is excessively personal and comes out as being overly proud of his present status as guest speaker in multiple events across the world. He spends much time describing elements that have little to do with the book’s topic, for instance his strange endeavour to take over and hollow out the New York Times, among other things by selling its Manhattan headquarters.

Overall, there is no reason to recommend to anyone to invest time and money in this overblown work.