Listen free for 30 days

  • The Lucifer Chord

  • Written by: F. G. Cottam
  • Narrated by: David Rintoul
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • 2.0 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

1 credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
The Plus Catalogue—listen all you want to thousands of Audible Originals, podcasts, and audiobooks.
$14.95 a month plus applicable taxes after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy Now for $20.48

Buy Now for $20.48

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Tax where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Ruthie Gillespie's efforts to find out the truth about a mysterious missing rock star lead her on a terrifying journey into the past. 

Researcher Ruthie Gillespie has undertaken a commission to write an essay on Martin Mear, lead singer and guitarist with Ghost Legion, the biggest, most decadent rock band on the planet, before he disappeared without trace in 1975. Her mission is to separate man from myth - but it's proving difficult, as a series of increasingly disturbing and macabre incidents threatens to derail Ruthie's efforts to uncover the truth about the mysterious rock star. 

Just what did happen to Martin Mear back in 1975? Is he really set to return from the dead, as the band's die-hard fans, the Legionaries, believe? It's when Ruthie's enquiries lead her to the derelict mansion on the Isle of Wight where Martin wrote the band's breakthrough album that events take a truly terrifying turn.... 

©2018 Francis Cottam (P)2019 Audible, Ltd

More from the same

What listeners say about The Lucifer Chord

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

I really wanted to like this

I wanted to be able to say "this is why you shouldn't judge a book by it's cover," but sadly, the cover was more than representative of the book itself- not very good.
I discovered, after the fact, that this is a follow-up to a trilogy. That explains a lot. While it does more or less (more less!) stand on its own, there's a lot of missing context and character development (the latter, I'm going to have to assume happened in the trilogy, but as it is, the characters feel like cut-outs. And oh my gosh, the main character was awful. The classic "gorgeous woman doesn't know she's gorgeous which makes men want her even more" trope. And she's a goth, apparently? Although you would never know it, apart from a few brief mentions of Doc Marten boots and a black wardrobe, and one guy calling her a gothic [slur]. It was so cheap...
There's an evil cult that we never actually learn anything about, other than that it heavily featured in the other books, and this book's villain is in it. Like, that's it. The world-building was hot garbage, the plot was surprisingly slow and lacking in suspense, and the writing, in general, was not great. And then there was the narrator, who, when doing straight narration wasn't bad, but when he was doing character voices was comically awful, His American woman sounded EXACTLY the same as his American man, and both of them had dreadful accents. The poor guy shouldn't have even tried to do different voices. He just can't.
Like I said. I wanted to like this. The premise sounded fun, with themes that I get a kick out of. I'm disappointed.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • George Payne
  • 2019-08-14

Rock never dies

Another excellent journey into the paranormal, but this time we are accompanied by familiar folks from the Woodstock generation. So much of the story seems plausible that it could be the stranger than fiction true story behind several our beloved rock and roll icons. Move over Robert Johnson.

2 people found this helpful