Get a free audiobook

The Moonstone

Penguin Classics
Written by: Wilkie Collins
Length: 21 hrs and 31 mins
5.0 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

CDN$ 14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Brought to you by Penguin.   

This Penguin Classic is performed by Jessie Buckley, Richard Cordery, Julian Wadham, David Sturzaker, Hugh Fraser, Bruce Alexander, Oscar Batterham, Matthew Spencer, James MacCallum, Stewart Clarke and Jot Davies. This definitive recording includes an introduction by Sandra Kemp.   

The Moonstone, a priceless yellow diamond, is looted from an Indian temple and maliciously bequeathed to Rachel Verinder. On her 18th birthday, her friend and suitor Franklin Blake brings the gift to her. That very night, it is stolen again. No one is above suspicion, as the idiosyncratic Sergeant Cuff and the Franklin piece together a puzzling series of events as mystifying as an opium dream and as deceptive as the nearby Shivering Sand.

Public Domain (P)2019 Penguin Audio

What listeners say about The Moonstone

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No reviews are available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Becca
  • 2020-01-07

SPOILERS IN THE FIRST 5 MINUTES

If you don't already know the story of the Moonstone and want the mystery to remain a mystery, do NOT listen to this audiobook. The first hour of the recording is an introduction the spoils the solution to the mystery in the first 5 minutes. I was so angry while I was listening that I almost crashed my car.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lisa Ann Robertson
  • 2020-06-20

Excellent Victorian Dectective Fiction

First, skip the first audio book chapter because it's a scholarly introduction and has plot spoilers. I'm going to listen to it now that I'm done with the novel. The servant's narrative is long and can get a bit tedious, but overall Collins has a wicked and somewhat subtle sense of humor that amused me to no end. I was intrigued by the story and pleasantly surprised that it's not an imperial romance, at least not in the usual sense. In fact, it might be the first Victorian novel I've read that treats other cultures with sensitivity. The moneylender isn't Jewish, which really breaks the mold, and I found myself wanting to know more about Collins' beliefs and politics. He seems to be actively countering gendered and racialized stereotypes. If you like long, meandering novels that you can settle into like a comfy robe then this is a novel for you.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Sarah Ragsdale
  • 2019-12-29

liked Woman in White, Moonstone is a bore

That's it. This was a big bore of a story. Hard to believe the same person wrote The Woman in White.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Tad Davis
  • 2020-09-21

About spoilers

Any recording with Jessie Buckley is going to be a fine one, and this does not disappoint. She caught my attention in the recent TV production of “Woman in White,” and she is phenomenal. Oh, and the rest of the cast is good too. Regarding spoilers: the very first words on the audiobook are: “If you’re coming to this for the first time, we recommend that you skip the introduction, because it reveals details of the plot.” Penguin has made it easier to do this on some of their titles by putting the introduction at the end. I’m not sure why they didn’t do so here: it matters more for “The Moonstone” than it does for most books.