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The Myth of Sisyphus

Written by: Albert Camus
Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini
Length: 5 hrs and 39 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

One of the most influential works of this century, The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays is a crucial exposition of existentialist thought. Influenced by works such as Don Juan and the novels of Kafka, these essays begin with a meditation on suicide; the question of living or not living in a universe devoid of order or meaning. 

With lyric eloquence, Albert Camus brilliantly posits a way out of despair, reaffirming the value of personal existence and the possibility of life lived with dignity and authenticity.

©1955 Alfred A. Knopf. Inc. (P)2019 Recorded Books

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requires further reading

I have read and reread this essay twice now, and I think I will reread it a few more times. the ideas expressed are very powerful, but Albert Camus' lyricism end tendency 2 site other philosophic and literary works make the material difficult to interpret. I recommend reading a few of the works he cites to get a better handle on the material.

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  • Richard B.
  • 2019-04-30

Brilliant work, excellently narrated

I have been relistened to parts of this for the past month, and it has allowed me to better recognize how to live to the fullest. As Camus writes, "one does not become aware of the absurd without being tempted to write a manual of happiness." This is one such manual. I'm very thankful this is available as a very well narrated audiobook. If you have not read it, do so right away!

91 people found this helpful

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  • J.B.
  • 2019-08-29

Talisman for diminishing suicide in our times


The Myth of Sisyphus, by Albert Camus, and narrated by Edoardo Ballerini. The essay(s) will provide insight into the meaningfulness of life. The essay(s) seek out and find the purpose for living even if you are a nihilist, an atheist, or a depressed bigot; and you believe the people you distaste are becoming ubiquitous, this read or listen will make you overcome that negativity.

Camus is not an easy read. First, because his vocabulary is advanced, and he will express himself in five-dollar words. There is nothing simple in his lexicon. Further, do not be surprised if you find dozens of sentences with three words you need to look up in the dictionary to recalculate the subtlety of its meaning. (You will find though his chosen words are precisely communicative.) Notwithstanding his diction, what he seeks to explain to the reader is not something that can be expressed in words: the world is strange and unfathomable yet there is something there to appreciate although what that is will never be known, so go at it with exuberance. Yes, I know that is not easy to grasp but neither is Camus. Hint – if you do take on the entertainment make sure you grasp what Camus means by the word absurd.

If you choose this intellectually gratifying challenge, be prepared for a reading that is only a little easier then Ulysses by James Joyce. Yet, it will get you to a better place in life; happier with what you have. It is the talisman for diminishing suicide in our times.

13 people found this helpful

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  • Nancy Southworth
  • 2019-08-24

Interesting

Well narrated and well written, interesting storyline, gave me food for thought, especially since I have been a personal friend to suicide, and my brother stuck a gun in his mouth and pulled the trigger such a waste of a good person who lost his way!

5 people found this helpful

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  • Sailfish
  • 2019-08-21

An enlightening take on a worthy absurd life

Edoardo Ballerini gave an excellent recitation of Albert Camus book. While I found Camus' arguments well stated and even compelling, he ends up covering the main arguments repeatedly which made the 2nd half of book somewhat tiring.

11 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 2019-09-16

Not as good as I remembered it back in high school

I had read the Myth of Sisyphus back in high school. The character resonated with me during a period of struggle. I saw this on the daily special and decided to read it again with a more adult perspective. It was completely different from my first experience. I probably only had read the short chapter about the Myth itself as the first part had a lot of philosophy and history about how the philosophy had developed. The narrator did an okay job with somewhat dry material. The myth chapter seemed to be far too short. I did enjoy some of the essays at the end of the book as the stories were a lot more interesting than simple dry philosophy.

3 people found this helpful

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  • DCR
  • 2019-08-28

Timely

I didn’t go looking for an introduction to philosophy. It came and found me. Camus directly is far superior to Camus interpreted by others. The Myth of Sisyphus is as good an invitation into a new world as any. Ballerini’s narration is the perfect voice for Camus. I’ll be listening again and exploring the works of other philosophers.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Joeb
  • 2019-03-22

simply a must read

the narrator was perfect for the writer. the book gives true insight to life . although sometime overly flamblyant is it quit ornate. A true clasic and a must read .

41 people found this helpful

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  • Kindle Customer Tom
  • 2019-08-23

Philosophy Majors Only

Unless you're a PhD in Philosophy, I'd forget about this. I was hoping for something practical, and all I got was a bunch of flowery words describing esoteric ideas. The actual Myth of Sisyphus wasn't even addressed until about three-fourths of the way through, and it was probably the shortest section of the whole book. On the plus side, the narrator did a good job with the material he was given. Overall, though, boring and not really useful.

13 people found this helpful

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  • Bob P.
  • 2019-09-04

Unfathomable

With 7 years of college and an undergraduate minor in philosophy, I had still never read any Camus. Now I know why. This book is far beyond my reading grade level. The author begins by saying he will discuss suicide - whether life is worth living or not. He then goes on about absurdity, losing me entirely. This is not the fault of the narrator, who does a fine job of reading material that is just too complex for my mind. I spent an hour and a half listening but admit I'm not going to stick around for the last 4 hours.

8 people found this helpful

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  • Phyllis
  • 2020-02-18

Pretentious and Dry as a Bone

Camus belongs in undergrad literature and philosophy classes with starry-eyed students who are willing the think this nonsense actually matters. Which it does not. Pompous pontificating...