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The Socratic Dialogues: Early Period, Volume 1

The Apology, Crito, Charmides, Laches, Lysis, Menexenus, Ion
Narrated by: David Rintoul, full cast
Length: 6 hrs and 32 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (4 ratings)
Price: CDN$ 23.77
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Publisher's Summary

Here are the Socratic Dialogues presented as Plato designed them to be - living discussions between friends and protagonists, with the personality of Socrates himself coming alive as he deals with a host of subjects, from justice and inspiration to courage, poetry and the gods.

Plato's Socratic Dialogues provide a bedrock for classical Western philosophy. For centuries they have been read, studied and discussed via the flat pages of books, but the ideal medium for them is the spoken word. Some are genuine dialogues while some are dialogues reported by a narrator supposedly at a later date.

Ukemi Audiobooks presents all of the Socratic Dialogues in a series of recordings divided into Early Period (Volumes 1 & 2), Middle Period (Volumes 1 & 2) and Late Period (Volume 1) - based on their likely composition by Plato. This opening volume starts with perhaps the most famous speech, The Apology, Socrates' doomed defence against the charge of heresy and corrupting the young. It is followed by Crito, in which Socrates' friend offers to spirit him out of Athens to avoid execution. Among the others are discussions on Courage (Laches), and Friendship (Lysis).

The role of Socrates is taken by David Rintoul, a widely admired and experienced audiobook reader who studied philosophy at university before taking a different path to RADA, TV, theatre and film. He is joined by a broad range of readers, most known to Audible listeners. Each Dialogue is prefaced with a short introduction to set the scene for newcomers to Plato.

Translation: Benjamin Jowett.

Public Domain (P)2017 Ukemi Audiobooks

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surprisingly comprehensible

I'm young, I'm not the sharpest knife, but most of the dialogues are pretty easy to follow, i see now why they are so recommended for beginners. my only complaint is that most of the cast sound the same, and therefore make it harder to follow who is talking; mix up your casts people. I know they were all greek, but throw in some voice actors that arent middle aged british white guys, and I won't have to try so hard to discern whether its socrates or his friend talking

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  • Jeff Lacy
  • 2018-05-30

Entertaining, insightful, stimulating

Stimulating, insightful, entertaining, fun. For goodness sakes it’s Socrates. What else could it be. Using Jowett’s translation. The performers are excellent and enrich the reading of the dialogues.

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  • mohadcheridi
  • 2017-12-21

I liked it very much...

This is a first class rendering of the socratic dialogues...Ukemi produces very fine audiobooks and i always keep an eye on their catalogue...

I really enjoyed it...

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  • Juan Malo
  • 2018-06-04

All of Plato is excellent and instruction

I enjoyed immensely all of these dialogues translated by Benjamin Jowett and performed superlatively by David Rintoul. Very highly recommended for those who seek an existential edification and a philosophic understanding of Ancient Greece as exemplified by the insightful writings of Plato in the character of Socrates his great teacher. Socrates said true wisdom is knowing that you don’t know. Find out what you don’t know by self and other examination! Rintoul’s performance in the character of Socrates is sheer brilliance, along with a great cast of supportive actors. Each Dialogue is briefly introduced with the characters and setting that are involved. I’m on to the next set of Dialogues in the order that they were supposedly written. The works of Plato, along with Shakespeare and Dostoevsky are my three books that I would take with me on a stranded desert island.