Listen free for 30 days

Audible Membership

$14.95 a month

1 credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
The Plus Catalogue—listen all you want to thousands of Audible Originals, podcasts, and audiobooks.
$14.95 a month plus applicable taxes after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy Now for $27.21

Buy Now for $27.21

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Tax where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The Strange Death of Europe is a highly personal account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide. Declining birth rates, mass immigration, and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive alteration as a society and an eventual end.

This is not just an analysis of demographic and political realities; it is also an eyewitness account of a continent in self-destruct mode. It includes accounts based on travels across the entire continent, from the places where migrants land to the places they end up, from the people who pretend they want them to the places which cannot accept them.

Murray takes a step back at each stage and looks at the bigger and deeper issues which lie behind a continent's possible demise, from an atmosphere of mass terror attacks to the steady erosion of our freedoms. The audiobook addresses the disappointing failure of multiculturalism, Angela Merkel's U-turn on migration, the lack of repatriation, and the Western fixation on guilt. Murray travels to Berlin, Paris, Scandinavia, Lampedusa, and Greece to uncover the malaise at the very heart of the European culture and to hear the stories of those who have arrived in Europe from far away.

This sharp and incisive audiobook ends up with two visions for a new Europe - one hopeful, one pessimistic - which paint a picture of Europe in crisis and offer a choice as to what, if anything, we can do next. But perhaps Spengler was right: 'civilizations, like humans, are born, briefly flourish, decay, and die'.

©2017 Douglas Murray (P)2017 Audible, Ltd

What the critics say

"This is a vitally important book, the contents of which should be known to everyone who can influence the course of events, at this critical time in the history of Europe." (Sir Roger Scruton)

What listeners say about The Strange Death of Europe

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    175
  • 4 Stars
    21
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    2
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    157
  • 4 Stars
    21
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    2
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    157
  • 4 Stars
    19
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Well written but a very sad reality for Europe.

I live in Canada our politicians are doing the same thing here and I fear we're going to face the same reality as Europe somewhere down the line. Why don't politicians listen to the people that built the country This is our home our lives our families we don't owe the world anything but we owe our family's everything

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

What is the exact value of this book?

This is one of those books where I enjoyed it because it coincides with what I believe but does not provide any real value. This is a long elaborate opinion that is mostly backed by news stories that I would imagine most people are already familiar with. One thing that threw me off is his presentation of the story of the little boy that washed up on the shore. I read the book about that little boy written by his aunt and the family lived in horrid conditions following their escape from Syria so saying the father had a job in Turkey was a very serious stretch to misrepresent their story. It just made me wonder how many of such reporting liberties were taken throughout the book. I also can't express enough how horrendous the narrator's accents are for various quotes from leaders/authors around the world. No matter if he's quoting someone from Italy or Iran, they all sound like they're from Transylvania. Losing the awfully cringe accents would make it much better. Again the overall tone of the book is great and is brave of the author to address these issues and there is immense value in that very fact. But in terms of its content I thought it didnt have much depth to it.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

a very interesting take

Murray is one of the most interesting thinkers coming out of europe and this book is a sobering read.

While one may disagree with a variety of his points, what cannot be denied is that there is at least something happening on the old continent

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Awesome book!

interesting collection of stories that really highlights the history of the migrant crisis in europe.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A powerful voice for reason

I found this book to be a much needed commentary on the state of the Europe and in general western democracies and how blindly following this globalist ideology is leading to a real perilous situation.
Wanting to be compassionate, caring , generous and charitable to others in need is a goal we should all strive for.
It needs to be balanced with whats sustainable, integration and support and costs and fairness needs to be apart of this conversation. In Canada we're abit farther behind on the curve on the impacts of not being prepaired, but there are so many lessons we can learn from looking at Europe that we should learn and heed before we make the same mistakes. #Audible1

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

When will Europeans wise up to the subversion.

We emigrated to Canada from UK in 1966; thank goodness. How did Brits. let this happen?

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A courageous examination of a controversial topic.

This book is remarkably well-written, backed up by extensive research on real events that have been reported on the news but have largely been forgotten or ignored. It is a courageous examination of a controversial and provocative subject. Its message is a pronouncement of an inconvenient truth that is obvious to most, but few dare to publicly admit for fear of running afoul of political correctness.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

must read/listen

when a book can take you on a rollercoaster of emotions,you know it's a good book

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Powerful, ominous, incising

Murray minces no words in describing what is at stake for Europe, and indeed any culture or civilization, which fails to understand itself, both positive and negative. Murray poses tough questions—the most poignant of which my be, why is it that no one seems to want to tackle how much Europe is and has changed because of mass, uncontrolled migration, and how it seemingly walked into this change so blindly? It might be light on proposals, and can feel a bit repetitive at times, but a reasonable person should walk away from this read wondering why too few care about, and seemingly too many desire, this strange death of Europe

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Something to think on.

You don’t have to agree with everything he says, but there are some very interesting points and thoughts in this book to consider. Maybe we should be asking some of these questions.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Dan
  • 2019-11-19

“The more a society drifts from truth, the more it will hate those that speak it”

This book is a must have. As “one sided” as some may think, it is based on indisputable facts. Two world wars and many lives were lost to maintain and keep a democratic Europe. Now Europe faces another war, a war of ideology and religion. This book gives a very detailed account of that war and what if anything can be done to stem the tide of defeat.

18 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sydney Hostetler
  • 2019-09-21

Everyone needs to read this book

My head is spinning. My heart is heavy. But I am very grateful to the author and publishers of this book. It is extremely well written. It speaks the truth that so many are unwilling to acknowledge or address.

14 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sebastian P.
  • 2019-10-01

Real story about open borders policy

Real,true story about consequences of uncontrolled flood of migrants, and mass media covering it. Manipulation of media coverage of the story,and politicians telling Europeans, that what they see,and experience,its not there.

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • smarmer
  • 2017-11-10

Disturbing dystopian preview of tidal wave

Douglas Murray gives the background of the wave of immigration, legal and illegal, that has swept Europe. The introduction of new cultures to Europe, when it occurred at a time that European culture was secure, added new ideas, new costumes, and new cuisines to the continent. However, when those arriving have little interest in assimilating, have even less interest in the parliamentary and relatively free economies, and the history and culture of the host countries, we risk a hostile take-over rather than an enriching and diversification. This is the point of this book's grim conclusion.

The first few chapters outline the problem in philosophical form. Then we get the historical numbers, followed by illustration after excruciating illustration of actual real-time happenings.

Much like herd immunity, when most of a population is secure in its beliefs, newcomers add variety in a constructive way. But if the population no longer values its identity and the newcomers have a more robust but antithetical identity and ideology, the newer and more virulent strains will eventually prevail.

Hopefully Murray's jeremiad is exaggerated, but I fear otherwise.

42 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Cherith Cutestory
  • 2021-01-14

Sheer venom.

- A few parts are good. The first couple of chapters, and the chapter Tiredness and The Feeling That the Story Has Run out, those had some interesting parts i.e. when the author speaks about culture, history and identity. The parts about the role of religion and the effect of Christianity's slow death in Europe are good.

- But when he tries to diagnose threats to culture, they are invariably Islamophobic, biased and exaggerated. He combs the news looking for any instances of Muslim migrants doing anything bad, and he exaggerates those cases as if they are the norm rather than the exception.

- Author unashamedly endorsed Slovakian prime minister's statement, "Islam has no place in Slovakia".

- In one of the low points of the book, he quotes insane Zionist and Islamophobe Daniel Pipes.

- He only mentions Judaism positively, he never mentions Israeli war crimes or pre-Israel Zionist terrorism committed by Haganah and other Jewish groups.

- He's pinning his hopes on Muslims abandoning the Quran to "defang and wound" Islam.

- The author is homosexual, so he tries to find stories of homosexuals being attacked by Muslims, but when he mourns Christianity's death in Europe, never mentions the violence inflicted on homosexuals by the church.

- He mentions several polls where Europeans are purportedly anti-Islamic, and he supports those polls. Then when one of those polls was shown to have anti-Jewish and anti-Buddhist answers, he was surprised. What he's saying: the right thing is to hate Muslims, but it's WEIRD that anyone would hate any other group!

Bottomline: could've been great, but Douglas Murray hates Islam and Muslims and wants you to hate them too. Like every other racist or antisemite or xenophobe, he too thinks his hatred and bigotry are based on facts and reason.

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • jeremy
  • 2019-09-26

The most important story ever to be ignored.

Should be carved into granite so that the future peoples that come back to enlightenment thousands of years after the coming dark ages have a tool to guide their way.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • R. Peters
  • 2018-09-21

Tried to give it a fair shot.

Couldn't finish it. Begins with an interesting comparison of conflicting cultural differences, then awkwardly devolves into concerns over white racial "purity".

18 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • lisa
  • 2021-01-06

White genocide tropes

How many digress of separation do you want your intellectual life to have from the Turner Diaries? The problem with this book is that if you haven’t taken the time to get educated on the language white of supremacist movements you’re likely to not see what’s being said to you here. It’s necessary to read books within the context of the larger society in which the author exists. Read anything by Kathleen Belew she’s the foremost expert on the subject first. Not only does this book use coded language it also has a lot of things that are factual incorrect.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lisa
  • 2017-05-10

I'm so glad I read this book!

I didn't understand what all the fuss and hostility was about in Europe these days and this book explained a lot. Douglas doesn't waste words he gets right to the point and then thoroughly explains the moving parts affecting each situation. There are plenty of points made in this insightful overview of pertinent recent history. It's funny that we are inundated with news and media but it seems to function as a big sponge soaking up all the happenings and squeezing them into a grey sludge. The Strange Death of Europe is like a lamp that allows you to see the whole shocking picture. With plenty of detail. Yikes. Good luck Europe. We will all miss you if you don't get your shit together.

35 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Kat Cat
  • 2019-01-22

Fear-mongering

This book may perhaps be well-intentioned, but it is misinformed and misleading. The rhetoric is designed to sow fear, rather than to encourage productive problem solving.

This book is a response to the challenges of living in an ethnically diverse, pluralistic society. These challenges are real, and clashes between different cultures and ideologies doubtlessly happen. The reluctance of many left-leaning politicians to discuss these issues can be a real problem.

However, having pointed out a real problem, the book takes its rhetoric in a wholly unproductive direction. Instead of addressing the roots of the problem (globalization, drastic economic inequality between countries, lack of effective international cooperation, colonial legacies, etc.), or suggesting practical solutions, the author puts a lot of effort into describing various ways in which immigrants are or could become a threat to the established peoples of Europe. He paints a lurid picture of the hordes of migrants pouring into Europe, bringing with them their barbaric customs, and shamelessly taking advantage of the Europeans' generosity. The solution to all Europe's problems, apparently, is to keep these barbarians out. With such a premise, the only thing that this book can hope to accomplish is to fan xenophobic fears.

Many rhetorical fallacies are committed here: presenting statistics out of context; treating exceptional individuals (e.g., terrorists) as if they were representative of a group (e.g., Muslims); treating large and diverse groups (all immigrants, all Muslims, all Europeans) as if they were a monolithic block with a uniform set of goals and values; portrayal of culture as something static and unchanging; overly simplistic divisions into "us and them." Worst of all, the book aims not to inform, but to frighten the reader. It presents a series of dramatic negative examples: immigrants committing crimes and acts of terror. These examples are memorable and alarming, but are they representative? We are given no numbers that could help us put them in perspective. On the other hand, the book presents no counter-examples of immigrants getting jobs, paying taxes, and living quiet uneventful lives - even though that is how most immigrants live in most places.

While the problems to which the book attempts to respond are real, this kind of rhetoric is counterproductive. The author seems to be asking for a return to some kind of golden age, when Europe was more culturally and ethnically uniform, and the problems posed by globalization didn't exist. I'm not sure that there has ever been such an age, but even if there had been, the clock can't be turned back. It's not only Europe that is changing, but the whole world. It is becoming more intermixed - not the least because of Europe's own foreign trade policies. The influx of immigrants into Europe is as much an effect of change as it is a cause. I would also like to point out that I don't remember the word "globalization" making a single appearance in the entire book; this should give some idea of how misguided it is in its arguments.

The thing that saddens me the most is the large number of positive reviews that this book has. That is how many people are allowing themselves to be manipulated through fear, when they could be using their critical thinking skills to evaluate the book's message for themselves.

44 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • SEVERIN
  • 2017-08-25

Grandiose

Perfect and constant performance for the narrator. Also that story needed to be told. Douglass Murray is very well spoken

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anamaria Zsoldi
  • 2020-05-25

True & sad !!!

The writer presents the actual state of EUROPE backed by researched facts. Impressive and very sad in the same time!!!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • The Prof
  • 2021-03-02

Staggering, but compelling account

This book rips the scales from our eyes. Europe is in its death throes but our leaders just bury their heads in the sand.