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The Will to Power: The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (54 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Who was Friedrich Nietzsche? This lonely and chronically ill, yet passionate, daring, and complex man is perhaps the most mysterious and least understood of all contemporary philosophers. Why are his brilliant insights so relevant for today? How did he become the most misinterpreted and unfairly maligned intellectual figure of the last two centuries?

To provide shape to Nietzsche's thought, each of these 24 lectures focuses on specific ideas that preoccupied Nietzsche while tracing the profound themes that give meaning to his work. You'll get a chance to put Nietzsche's life and work in a larger historical and philosophical context. You'll explore the controversial philosopher's subtle, complex critique of both religious belief and Greek rationalism.

You'll also spend a wealth of time focusing on Nietzsche's famous writing style, which deftly combines the majesty of the prophet, the force of the Homeric warrior, and the lyricism of the poet - but which nonetheless is rife with inconsistencies, exaggerations, and personal attacks. And you'll get a better understanding of Nietzsche's complaints and criticisms of the intellectual currents of his time: Christian moralism, evolution, socialism, democracy, and nationalism.

As you make your way through these lectures, you'll discover that Nietzsche, even at his most polemical and offensive, exudes an unmistakable enthusiasm and love of life. In fact, you'll see that his exhortation to learn to love and accept one's own life, to make it better by becoming who one really is, forms the project that is the true core of his work.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©1999 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)1999 The Great Courses

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A Will to Listen

This book seems like a good intro in everything Nietzsche. First book I read on him and I found the instructors did a good job giving the essence of him in a way I could understand.

I also liked the format of 30 min lectures. It allows for each lecture to convey one topic about Nietzsche/his philosophy without overwhelming you.

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Great listening in the car.

Excellent explanations, an engaging exploration of Nietzsche. Robert and Kathleen are articulate thinkers that are pleasant to listen to.

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Perfect For Newer Philosophy Fans

I bought a couple Nietzsche books in the past; but this was way more digestable.

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It’s a lecture

Great for while doing dishes or laundry. There is no better time to have an existential crisis.

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not very captivating.

the speakers clearly had knowledge of the subject matter. but the overall tone is not very captivating. also the chapters only skim very macro ideas. never gets deeper into detail. I never got a sense of rationalization of view points.

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The Will to Nietzsche

Course was a beautiful summary of Nietzsche's misunderstood philosophy. Despite not agreeing with some of the interpretations presented, the lecturers simplified much of Nietzsche's sometimes abstract and often contradictory writings.

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The Will To Truth!

This was a very good introduction into Nietzsche philosophy.Both of the narrators did a good job at keeping the content engaging. Definitely wet my appetite for for further investigation. Highly recommended!

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Disappointing

First I admit this is my first foray into Philosophy. I found the book poorly constructed. By having each chapter deal with a theme ( like justice, or power) I felt I never learned the essence or primary ideas of Nietzscha. I was left with many parts but no satisfying whole.

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  • Charley Yeager
  • 2015-03-09

Perfect entry point for understanding Nietzsche

Where does The Will to Power: The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Very satisfying, will be listened to sever times to fully understand.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

good balance of biography and analysis with extensive contextual education

What does Professor Kathleen M. Higgins and Professor Robert C. Solomon bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

world class expertise and passion for Nietzsche

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I knew I was interested in Nietzsche, but I never knew I would adore his views this much

Any additional comments?

combine this book with some additional content to get a more rounded experience, a Nietzsche documentary or a read of his work (which is difficult to appreciate for me taken alone)

16 people found this helpful

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  • Catherine Spiller
  • 2015-05-19

An apology (classical sense) for Nietszche

Thoughtful, but with much more of a focus on defending Nietszche from attacks than actually exploring his thought. We learn speculative theories, but relatively little about specific works.

21 people found this helpful

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  • Madeleine
  • 2014-04-13

Engaging Course

This is a very comprehensive course on Nietzsche. Not just his works and his thoughts, but there is a rather helpful and contexualizing of his life as well.

It's a real pleasure to listen to lecturers who love their subject. A few, though by no means all, of these Courses series are taught by people who have a really selective preference for certain parts of what their teaching, but not all of it, and it shows.

Professors Higgins and Solomon are tremendous fans of Nietzsche's work; it comes through in their passion and enthusiasm for the topic and it makes some of the harder-to-grasp concepts presented much easier to take on board.

I also really appreciated some of the back and forth, dialogic style of the presentation. It made the apologetics more vibrant and fertile.

27 people found this helpful

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  • W. Donovan
  • 2018-10-12

Magnificent

This series of lectures by Profs Solomon and Higgins sheds a lot of light into Nietzsche’s philosophy. I would recommend a brief detour into a critic of Nietzsche, Ronald Beiner and his audiobook Dangerous Minds, first. That way you can contrast this lecture series, with its extended deep dive into Nietzschian thought, with a critic’s point-of-view in the background. I liked this despite how some historical bad actors have used Nietzsche to bolster their arguments, like the Nazis with the ubermensch and “will to power” concepts. Nietzsche actually disliked anti-semites and wrote extended critiques of 19th century Germany; so, it’s beyond me why the Nazis thought he was an inspiration - Nietzsche would’ve called them on their b.s. posthaste. I love the concept of eternal recurrence, and it’s corollary of amor fati (love of fate). I love the idea of embracing life and trying to be creative, and treating your life as a creative act. The lecturers are both engaging and fun, and funny. If you like philosophy, then I’d say you can’t go wrong with this great course. The critics will have a deeper understanding, and the enthusiasts will be even more enthused. Great job.

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  • josh
  • 2016-06-27

Great speakers

Awesome lectures and easy to follow. Loved it. Hope to hear more from them. Thank you

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  • Buzzy
  • 2016-03-22

Amazing intro to Nietsche's work

It made me want to read each and every book by Friedrick Nietzche. Amazing philosopher.

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  • matthew
  • 2015-03-12

Great introduction to Nietzsche

Any additional comments?

This is a great course for anyone seeking to understand the basic philosophical frameworks of Nietzsche. I am a Master's student and used the lectures from this audio book to prepare for a course in sociology theory. I really enjoyed the content and found it to be extremely helpful in providing an overview for such an in depth subject. I liked the fact that the lecturers were husband and wife, and I especially enjoyed hearing a women's perspective on Nietzsche, who is often portrayed as misogynistic. They clarified the fundamental themes in Nietzsche's writings, and provided context that my college course did not.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 2019-05-07

Some strong points, but...

... it seemed to me that a lot of the comments made by the professors were very questionable in terms of Neitzche’s philosophy. For example, regarding moral relativism, the professor made some absurd analogy like, “having a definite moral standard all the way across the world would be like giving every student an ‘A’ on a research paper regardless of how each student performed, so even though most people would be happy (the majority) there would be a few exceptional individuals who did very well who would be cheated because they worked harder than everyone else.” This was baffling to me, because the very example he uses presupposes a universal principle applies equally to everyone in the class, namely that if you work hard and do well then you should be rewarded, and also that there is a universal standard by which each paper is graded. How this slipped past the professor is a mystery to me. Beyond that, many times, the professor vehemently denies any negative actions taken in history which claimed to be taken because of his philosophy, simply stating that “they don’t understand Neitzche,” or that they even did the exact opposite of what Neitzche was trying to put forward. The biggest irony for me of the lectures was hearing about Neitzche’s tragic life, and how his sister had to care for him for the last several years of his life when he was virtually completely disabled. To me it begged the question, what if his sister had carried out his philosophy on compassion and love?

There are some redeeming qualities however, as this is a helpful resource to just have a brief overview of his basic philosophy and the things he is most well known for. It is essential to understand the thoughts of men like Neitzche, even if we disagree with them, simply for the fact that they have shaped the world that we now live in. Ideas have consequences.

13 people found this helpful

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  • John Carnes
  • 2015-05-30

Get more out of life and open yourself to the possibility of more!

Great series and it helps immensely that it's in 30 min bite size chucks because it is nice to reflect on the subject matter immediately after a lecture.

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  • mylifeisnotthesame
  • 2015-06-29

Questionable Interpretations

What would have made The Will to Power: The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche better?

A different set of professors/lecturers would have been potentially better. Professor Solomon's and Higgins' interpretations of Nietzsche are sometimes highly suspect. I'm not a professional philosopher, but I have spent a fair amount of time studying and reflecting upon Nietzsche's works with the aid of secondary literature.

For example, early on in the lectures, Professor Solomon insists that Nietzsche isn't a moral relativist in the strictest sense. This is a very questionable reading of Nietzsche's moral philosophy. While I am aware that Nietzsche saw the rise of nihilism as a problem for humanity, the most plausible interpretation of his works clearly suggests that he was a moral anti-realist. For this reason, it seems as though Professor Solomon is trying to fit Nietzsche into his own worldview rather than representing the philosophy more objectively.

Not all of the lectures are as disappointing. The lectures on Amor Fati and Nietzsche's virtue ethics are interesting and on point for the most part.

My biggest complaint is Professor Solomon's narration style. It reminded me of why I often despise the lecture format for learning in general. It turns out that "how you say it" does indeed matter just as much as "what you say."

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Very dull delivery.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Dissapointment.

20 people found this helpful