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Publisher's Summary

National Best Seller

A bold and urgent argument by economist and former bank governor Mark Carney on the radical, foundational change that is required if we are to build an economy and society based not on market values but on human values.

Our world is full of fault lines - growing inequality in income and opportunity; systemic racism; health and economic crises from a global pandemic; mistrust of experts; the existential threat of climate change; deep threats to employment in a digital economy with robotics on the rise. These fundamental problems and others like them, argues Mark Carney, stem from a common crisis in values. Drawing on the turmoil of the past decade, Mark Carney shows how "market economies" have evolved into "market societies" where price determines the value of everything.

When we think about what we, as individuals, value most highly, we might list fairness, health, the protection of our rights, economic security from poverty, the preservation of natural diversity, resources, and beauty. The tragedy is, these things that we hold dearest are too often the casualties of our 21st century world, where they ought to be our bedrock.

In this profoundly important new book, Mark Carney offers a vision of a more humane society and a practical manifesto for getting there. How we reform our infrastructure to make things better and fairer is at the heart of every chapter, with outlines of wholly new ideas that can restructure society and enshrine our human values at the core of all that we build for our children and grandchildren.

©2021 Mark Carney (P)2021 Penguin Random House Canada

What the critics say

"A fantastic read for anyone interested in the most pressing issues facing the world. Carney articulates the dilemmas that lie between society's values and the economic market's value. He proposes a more fruitful path for bringing them closer together, so that the challenges we face can be seen as opportunities to solve. The need for a world of profit with better purpose is explained in such a clear and persuasive style. I hope it gets read by many people. His final chapter about humility, alone, is worthy for its lovely description of the realities of the journey to apparent success." (Jim O'Neil, chair of Chatham House, former chairman, Goldman Sachs Asset Management, former commercial secretary to the Treasury)

"Value(s) is a radical book and speaks out accessibly as to how we get everyone involved in solving our problems. And this is what we need: 50 Shades of People for 50 Shades of Green. Great leadership is not a bull horn but rather, as Mark Carney shows, a set of clear instructions in a smoke-filled room." (Bono)

"An essential book for anyone interested in how to ensure a sustainable and fair future for generations to come. Mark Carney argues that we must increasingly draw on our fundamental Canadian values to ensure that markets work to bend the arc of history towards climate and social justice and a sustainable future. His ten point plan for a sustainable recovery is what the next generation needs and deserves. Carney envisions a future for Canada, coming out of the Pandemic, that builds value for all and recognizes that our economy is deeply embedded in nature, not apart from it." (Edward Burtynsky) 

What listeners say about Values

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A Erudite Lexicon is Esoteric

TLDR: It was erudite and esoteric towards very simple proposals that had almost nothing to do with his evidence.

While it's clear the Carney has a firm understanding of the ins and outs of high finance. He prattles on for way too long to come to an overly simple point. I find he uses his knowledge of jargon and intricacies of financial and monetary systems to come to sweeping conclusions that barely have anything to do with his "evidence". There is a severe lack of data being used throughout the work to the detriment of the text. Relying instead on an appeal to his own authority, making many of his arguments fallacious at best.

The book gives one the sense that it was written by a bureaucratic elite for bureaucratic elites. While simultaneously claiming the policy recommendations are "democratic" as opposed to what they really are: bureaucratic and elitest.

But for the sake of humanity, I hope he can at least come close to some of the proposed reforms. Anything at this point to stop climate change.

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good read

A solid follow up to Bill Gates' 'How to prevent a climate disaster'. Well read by the author.

3 people found this helpful

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Smug overload, dry content

Boring and full of self sanctification. Carney tells us how he saved the world and will save the world and why you’re evil for not letting him save the world. Massive arguments for seizing private enterprise to push political agendas.

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Professional Narrators Have Value

I found the content of this book to be rather tedious and written in a way that seemed to emphasize the intellect of the writer more than anything. In addition, the author's narration was not helpful. Many good points in content were made without emphasis and in a tone that just sort of trailed off. Whatever the content, a good professional narrator would have been a major contribution to the audio version.

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Tales of a Parasite

Don't be fooled by the smooth voice of the narrator. I view Mark as a parasitic, dirt bag boomer! I thought I lived in a free country in my 20's but it's very apparent that the western world is just a open air prison. The west is a big Tax farm where communist just print money to fund welfare, bloated government and liabilities. People can't afford Democracy. I tell all, able bodied males to leave the west before the cage is completely closed. When you have communists running your currency, you are destined to starve. Economics isn't hard. You can sum up Economics "There is no free lunch". Marks highest value is equality; equality doesn't exist in this dimension. He projects onto everyone and believes in group values. Countries are made up of peoples collective individual values. Communist always have purity tests and purge the people that don't fall in line. Get ready for the apartheid and the Gulag, Commands. Canada sold all it's gold and Mark says the currency is backed by awesome bureaucracy. This guy is sniffing is own farts. Everyone should read this book, so you understand how government wants to enslave you. Covid has taught us, we don't even own our own bodies. Mark you better dig your bunker extra deep for the HELL you Marxist Boomers have brought upon this world. "You will own nothing and be happy, dipshit" LOL.

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I understood very little, but still enjoyed

This might have gone a lot better for me if I had some background in political science and economics. So much information that felt over my head. I felt quite lost for most of it. It made for some tough listening.

There may be more information presented than was needed to make certain points or arguments, but he's an excellent speaker and seems well versed in his area of expertise.

I enjoyed most the sections where he talks more plainly about the climate disaster and presents concepts for solutions. I found it complimentary to the subjects and content found in Bill Gates "how to avoid a climate disaster."

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What editor?

An insightful book, but the edited Massey Lectures done for CBC is a more succinct treatment of the topics here. My only criticism is that Carney gives a complete pass to government debt, and identifies the existential crisis of our day as the Climate crisis. He may be right, but it seems odd to have the former Governor of 2 national banks, however eloquent and detailed he may be, talk so much about climate change and so little on out of control debt.
Still, his discussion on values is very interesting, the book just needed an editor to cut down on all the policy and details.

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a very interesting book

The book was a great read. An interesting perspective from a very accomplished professional. The scope of the book was wide but it was also thoroughly examined.

My review of performance is low because of the less than good quality of audio. I have the audio quality for download set to high. I've noticed the low quality of other books recently, slight unnatural pauses and stutters which makes it difficult to understand The content.

I have heard the author/narrator speak in other places and he does not seem to have those pauses in other places.

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Economy & Climate Change

Author knowledge on banking is very strong, expert. However, he has very idealistic view of Climate Change, not grounded in reality. He should stick to what he knows, banking!

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Future prime minister?

We’ll thought out descriptions and solutions to the problems of our time. Our country would be in good hands with Mark Carney in charge.

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  • Federico Botero J.
  • 2021-07-21

Excelente contenido

Me gustó su claridad, el poder de las ideas que comparte, la bibliografía que integra. Poderoso