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iGen

The 10 Trends Shaping Today's Young People - and the Nation
Written by: Jean M. Twenge Ph.D.
Narrated by: Madeleine Maby
Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (20 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

An entertaining first look at how today's members of iGen - the children, teens, and young adults born in the mid-1990s and later - are vastly different from their millennial predecessors and from any other generation, from the renowned psychologist and author of Generation Me.

With generational divides wider than ever, parents, educators, and employers have an urgent need to understand today's rising generation of teens and young adults. Born in the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s and later, iGen is the first generation to spend their entire adolescence in the age of the smartphone. With social media and texting replacing other activities, iGen spends less time with their friends in person - perhaps why they are experiencing unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, and loneliness.

But technology is not the only thing that makes iGen distinct from every generation before them; they are also different in how they spend their time, in how they behave, and in their attitudes toward religion, sexuality, and politics. They socialize in completely new ways, reject once sacred social taboos, and want different things from their lives and careers. More than previous generations, they are obsessed with safety, focused on tolerance, and have no patience for inequality. iGen is also growing up more slowly than previous generations: 18-year-olds look and act like 15-year-olds used to.

As this new group of young people grows into adulthood, we all need to understand them: Friends and family need to look out for them; businesses must figure out how to recruit them and sell to them; colleges and universities must know how to educate and guide them. And members of iGen also need to understand themselves as they communicate with their elders and explain their views to their older peers. Because where iGen goes, so goes our nation - and the world.

©2017 Jean M. Twenge (P)2017 Simon & Schuster Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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    3 out of 5 stars

Great observations: weak conclusions

This book is a bizarre mix of fascinating observations and heavy-handed conclusions. When Twenge sticks to observing iGen attitudes and the contrast of those with other generations, her work is illuminating. When she beats to death the reader with her (not well backed-up) conclusion that mobile phones are the primary cause of young people’s high levels of anxiety, she weakens her work. She seems to understand nothing of economics and the lingering impact of the Great Recession’s continuing impact on society. She seems to understand little of how helicopter parenting and safetyism are driving kids to rely on their mobiles to interact rather than hang out together. It’d be nice to have a version of the book that cuts out the preaching and focuses on the observations.

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Helps understand a new generation

I really appreciate the content of the book, it is thorough in reviewing differences between Igen, millenials and boomers, and does a good job at backing the data with testimonials. It has great insights on understanding a new generation and helps bridging a gap.
However I found the writing quite typical of an academic. If there is a PDF with the book, I did not find the figures cited as supporting material, which made the delivery of numbers and facts more tedious.
I did not find the writing compelling, and the narration did not help. The reading did not make the overall presentation more engaging.
I recommend the book for the value it brings, but would maybe get the hard copy instead of the audio version.

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  • JJ
  • 2018-10-12

Scary but good!

As a millennial even I am scared of the iGeneration. This book was a very interesting read and definitely helps to explain some of the social changes we are seeing, especially on campuses. I highly recommend everyone read this book as some of the conclusions are very concerning.

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Very Informative. A must read

Anybody who works with the youth of today will find this read a fascinating look at intergenerational trends. Parents, teachers, and employers will benefit by gaining a better understanding of how today's youth live in a super connected world

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igen.. nice intro for a boomer ;)

learn a lot and made me understand a bit more about the perspective, hope and reality this igen is facing ... very different than mine.. 50 years ago!

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  • Elizabeth
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • 2017-10-19

Really, Amazon, no PDF?

This is a fascinating topic, written by a great scholar in the subject matter. Unfortunately, the narrator frequently refers to graphs and studies that are presumably shown and/or are sourced in footnotes. Unlike with other Audible titles, there does not appear to be a companion pdf for this book.

28 of 28 people found this review helpful

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  • tdg
  • 2017-12-15

Interesting study of today's youth

First, Madeleine Maby's performance was perfect. So many readers mispronounce or make incorrect inflections. She is also pleasant to listen to, with just the right pacing.

Ms. Twenge both intrigues and frightens with this in depth study. Having both Millennial and iGen children I have noticed to contrast in thinking, confidence, and work ethic.

A recurring word throughout is "safety". I've raised my kids to understand the world is not a safe place, it never has been and never will be, so learn to deal with that. Yet they still fear the future and lack confidence; just as pointed out in this book.

The abundance of statistics was impressive, however I think the publisher fails us in not providing a companion PDF file. I would have liked to see the numbers and graphs the author refers to.

I went into this book curious and with an open mind. As I progressed I noticed one of the main premises seems incorrect. Twenge even included this in the book's subtitle. She contends that iGen is more tolerant, yet spent a great deal of time demonstrating their complete lack of tolerance.

Tolerance is the acceptance of ideas and constructs that conflict with your own. What Twenge calls tolerance is really acceptance of compatible or already accepted behaviours. iGen accepts only ideas that they believe in. Ideas that contradict their own are considered "harmful" and not only go unheard, but they demand zero-tolerance and punishment. Severe punishment in fact. How does this differ from a northerner in 1840 accepting slavery as an alternative lifestyle?

I love that iGen is hard working, not arrogant, and libertarian. However, it scares the hell out of me that they don't believe in the 1st Amendment and believe even accidentally or unintentional offenses should be punishable by termination or worse. When these people come into political power such intolerance could have radical and negative ramifications. We could be staring down at the end of freedom in exchange for safety and conformity.

Using Twenge's reasoning every generation is tolerant since we all tolerate ideas and actions that confirm to our own standards. Accepting homosexuality is tolerant only if you believe it is wrong. I was raised to be tolerant, allowing others to have opposing ideas, listen to them, and consider the merits. I don't see any evidence of this mindset in a safe-zone generation.

15 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • tj
  • 2019-03-22

Essential information on the next generation

iGens are not like millennials. Screen time, isolation, anxiety and virtual relationships are huge factors in their lives. They need encouragement, live experiences, more time to mature. This book gives insight to how they think.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Sabrina
  • Vermillion, SD, United States
  • 2018-11-15

It's all right

not the best book I've listened too. It's pretty accurate as far as data and observations go but Dr. twenge struggles to keep her bias for solutions and opinions out of the latter half of the book the first half she is very careful though. the interviews with igenners are very insightful

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Eric Roush
  • 2018-04-03

Irreplaceably insightful

Milestone glimpse into the rising generation focused on safety and doing well while growing up slowly.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • G. R. Sumpter
  • North Carolina
  • 2017-10-10

Great Information...but

Great Information but difficult to process via audio book. May want to follow up with hard copy.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Megan B.
  • 2017-10-03

Don't buy your kid a smartphone...

.... until you read this book! Such important information far exceeding just that aspect. I have 3 daughters under age 11 and this was so thought provoking!

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Will R.
  • 2018-12-18

Triggered

As a member of iGen on the older side of the spectrum, I'll admit a lot of this book rings true! However I felt the tonality of the narrator however was very 'judgy' and until the very end doesn't offer any suggestions. It's worth a listen, especially for anyone older than 30 looking to figure out why we're on the verge of a major mental health crisis.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Kathryn Hollenbach
  • 2019-10-05

Excellent information

Interesting and informative. Read slowly but Speeding it up was great! Give insight into the effect iGen will have on all of us.

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  • JAS
  • LA, CA
  • 2019-08-30

Hard to Connect to this Audiobook

Great topic with tons of research, so on paper this should work. In fact, this book works probably much better on paper as opposed to streaming. It's frustrating to attempt to absorb graphs and supporting information here on an audiobook, as well as the quiz at the top where you actually need to tabulate different columns for your answer. On paper, this may well be a compelling read. But the author's message is hard to take seriously in this audiobook.

A bigger part of my problem with this Audiobook is the Narrator. While she has a pleasant sounding voice, the voice really doesn't fit the author. The youthfulness of the Narrator undermines the seasoned authority of the Author. When the Author references her research from over ten years ago for a previous book, it sounds comedically unlikely. Frankly, the Narrator suggests someone in her mid-late 20s, tops. She may have a professional sound and seriousness about her, but her voice continually pulls me out of this book. I kept trying to imagine that this voice represents the voice of someone with lots of anthropological experience under her belt - in addition to being a mother of three. I'm sorry, but this Reader sounds barely out of college.

Occasionally, when the Narrator dons the voice of some of the younger interviewees, I thought that maybe that was why they chose this Reader. But, between the graphs etc that aren't available here on an audiobook as well as the earnest but terribly miscast Reader, I had to stop about 1/3 of the way through.