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They Called Me Number One

Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School
Auteur(s): Bev Sellars
Narrateur(s): Bev Sellars
Durée: 7 h et 17 min
4,7 out of 5 stars (246 évaluations)

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Description

Like thousands of Aboriginal children in the United States, Canada, and elsewhere in the colonized world, Xatsu'll chief Bev Sellars spent part of her childhood as a student in a church-run residential school. These institutions endeavored to "civilize" Native children through Christian teachings; forced separation from family, language, and culture; and strict discipline. Perhaps the most symbolically potent strategy used to alienate residential school children was addressing them by assigned numbers only - not by the names with which they knew and understood themselves.

In this frank and poignant memoir of her years at St. Joseph's Mission, Sellars breaks her silence about the residential school's lasting effects on her and her family - from substance abuse to suicide attempts - and eloquently articulates her own path to healing. They Called Me Number One comes at a time of recognition - by governments and society at large - that only through knowing the truth about these past injustices can we begin to redress them.

Bev Sellars is chief of the Xatsu'll (Soda Creek) First Nation in Williams Lake, British Columbia. She holds a degree in history from the University of Victoria and a law degree from the University of British Columbia. She has served as an advisor to the British Columbia Treaty Commission.

©2013 Bev Sellars (P)2017 Audible, Inc.

Ce que les auditeurs disent de They Called Me Number One

Moyenne des évaluations de clients
Au global
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Histoire
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Important Canadian History

This is a story that should never have happened. Every Canadian should read this book. Bev is a bit dry to listen to as a narrator, but I couldn’t leave the book alone. I felt all of her pains and understand her hate. I am so sad and upset that the Native People Of Canada went through this- Good on you Bev for rising to the top. READ THIS BOOK.

9 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

AMAZING

Bev Sellars is a magnificent storyteller. Her truth and passion left me many times with goosebumps and the feeling that I wish I knew her and her family. I can’t speak highly enough of her book. Masterpiece.

7 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Thank You!

as I listened to this book, as a native women. I had a lot of "wow moments". my grandma was in a Residential school in Alberta. my Grandma had eight children when passed away as a baby and my dad was the only boy. as my dad grew up I feel like he's been through a lot and has taken out his anger on his children and I think it has a lot to do with his mother being in residential schools as well as his father so it's kind of like a domino effect. even though I never went to residential schools my dad was raised by someone that did and it has messed him up which has messed me up my only goal in life is to be the best mother that I can take my children and not let this affect my children today. trust me when I say it is very difficult because sometimes I see my dad and myself, however at least I can recognize that and take a breath and start again. this was a great eye opener to me I have learnt a lot and even though my family has suffered and is still suffering all I can do is have my children appreciate their elders an understanding of history and be proud of who they are mentally emotionally spiritually. this book is a really good lesson I recommended 100% people need to know how bad residential schools were and how it still affects us today.

6 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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A reality check for us Colonizing Canadians

I listened with difficulty as I struggle to come to terms with the darker side of my Canadian identity. This book and others like it MUST become part of the curriculum in our basic Canadian education!

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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Every non-indigenous person living in Canada should listen/read.

This book will give perspective and break your heart. The author did an amazing job telling the story of her experience. Loved it and thankful for it.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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Recommended listening for all Canadians

Bev Sellars gives an even-handed overview of the impact that residential schools had on her community. Her honest and thorough narration is powerful and brave as she clearly paints a picture of how institutional policies have negatively affected indigenous lives in BC through this biographical work. I cannot recommend this book enough for anyone who is curious about what the schools were like and what the lasting psychological effects were for the children who attended.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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So authentic

I love it when I book can be read by the author. It adds so much authenticity to the story and I really feel a kin to that person and their life. First Nations people have so much to teach us. This book was sad, powerful and uplifting. A real treasure.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

empowering

Finally a story about an indigenous woman who has claimed victory over the trauma of living through residential school, and this history of colonization in Canada. As an indigenous woman hoping to one day help my community, I found my strength and energy renewed after hearing this story. Thank Bev Sellers for sharing your story and showing that indigenous women can be powerful and strong ♥️

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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No residential school story is the same. We must listen.

Great audio recording. The experience shared is appreciated. The self realization experiences are relatable. Thank you Bev.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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Amazing.

Was easy to follow and the wrap up at the end was beautiful. Shares many views of life before and after residential schools.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Susie
  • 2017-08-22

Shame on Church and State

"Few people know anything about the collaboration of church and state to destroy races of people and cultures, genocide in the name of god."

Bev Sellars' often brutal testimony, gives insight into the cycle of poverty of indigenous peoples in Canada and (as she says) the United states, and even into Australia. She shows how dehumanization and cultural obliteration are passed down through generations.

She asks, "Is it possible to make others feel what I once felt?" The answer is yes. Her grandmotherly storyteller voice made me feel like I was hearing personal family history that I needed for my own survival.

Kindnesses shine like stars, but the bleakness is shameful and will be among the list of books that bolster my fight against systematic oppression.

6 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Christina
  • 2020-02-07

A truth that must be told.

This should be required reading for all schools. I was lucky, my grandmother saved me from the 60’s sweep. And I escaped the res, school experience, but my mother let slip some of her horrid experiences.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Melissa
  • 2019-12-30

True story

Many of the stories Bev shares in this book are similar to the stories elders that have shared with us regarding boarding school life.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Denise Stacey
  • 2020-03-20

They call me number One

This book was excellent. The explanations of life in the residential schools was so well described. The author brought you into the world of the Indians and their struggles, physically, mentally and generationally. I learned so much and have a better understanding of the reservations and the residential schools. Bev Sellars tells a story that reaches one’s soul! She is an amazing author!

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Misty
  • 2020-02-21

loved it

thank you for sharing! sharing is healing for all as us indigenous people can relate and understand ther historical trauma in our own families