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Anthropology and the Study of Humanity

Narrated by: Scott M. Lacey
Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (52 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

What does it mean to be human? Where did we come from? And what unites us in our diversity today? Anthropology and the Study of Humanity is your chance to tackle these big questions as you survey one of the world's most engaging - and human - sciences. Taught by acclaimed professor and field researcher Scott M. Lacy of Fairfield University, these 24 wide-ranging lectures are the ideal guide through the world of anthropology, or the study of humanity across time and space.

Professor Lacy gives you an elegant blend of theory and application to help you understand this extraordinarily interdisciplinary field as a whole. You will examine how humans evolved and built civilizations, review humanity's changing attitudes about our relationship to the cosmos, and consider the many ways we express ourselves. In the end, what you'll discover is that while our species is rich with diversity, we are all one human race.

To anchor this course, Professor Lacy gives you a historical overview of Homo sapiens, starting at the very root of our family tree, when proto-humans split away from other primates in the animal kingdom. As he wends his way across time and around the world, he also introduces the field's four major academic sub-disciplines: biological, archaeological, linguistic, and cultural anthropology.

One of the joys of this course is that it is truly global in the way Professor Lacy introduces you to the boots-on-the-ground practice of the field. When you complete this course, you will have a new appreciation for our world and its many cultures, but you will also have a new appreciation for the cultural connections and similarities we share as one race of Homo sapiens. With a passionate and knowledgeable professor as your guide, this course gives you a broad understanding of academic anthropology, as well as a deeper appreciation for humanity as a whole.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2017 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2017 The Great Courses

What listeners say about Anthropology and the Study of Humanity

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our story

Great information. A story of our 7 million year journey. What a ride! An absolute recommendation

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Is this Anthropology or Socialist dogma ?

The author is passionate and cares about his own personal topic: farming in Mali I get that. He went to school after his experience doing farming in the Peace Coprs and decided to become an Anthropologist, following what I can only be summarize as the modern Socialist curriculum. So that is the lens for all the information provided. There is a review on audible.com by "Robert M Nimocks" that does an excellent summary of my concerns and objections. I am disappointed as I also learned Anthropology and Social Anthropology decades ago, and the bias has now become excessive in my opinion.

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A Fantastic Introduction to Cultural Anthology

Lacey uses his thought-provoking experiences as a Peace Corps volunteer and later anthropologist to bring diverse anthropological perspectives into a relatable anecdote. The narration is clear and intriguing and Lacey's passion for the subject matter is clearly evident.

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Great listen

The readers voice is capturing and the content is very comprehensive and well written. will be looking for more from "The Great Courses"

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Excellent lecture series!

Can’t say enough about this series of lectures. Each lecture was informative, interesting, and encouraged me to reframe what I thought I knew. More of this please!

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Monkey Man

Good overview of Anthropology. Easy listening and well tied together. Not an evolution fan, don't have enough faith in pig bones I guess. Good pounts about living with the people rather than being an academic. Give it a listen

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Learned a lot!

The information contained in this series is varied and I learned a lot. Professor Lacey is excellent to listen to, feels like your right in his class room.

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  • Carrie Rutan
  • 2019-09-06

Narration is everything with audio..

Although the topic is interesting to me - I wouldn't have bought the book otherwise - I can't stand the presentation. Mr. Lacey cannot get through a paragraph without saying "I mean". He also has some other verbal what I'll call tics "Fred, he went to the post office" rather than "Fred went to the post office". Maybe it's just me, but it's too distracting.

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  • kenneth c dunbar
  • 2018-04-07

Perfect for the Anthropology Student

Dr. Lacey is engaging, entertaining, intelligent, and at times hilarious; in this introduction to Anthropology. While he professes cultural relativism without speaking at any length regarding cultural incompatibility; he still drives home the need for objectivity in researching humans. This is highly recommended for the Anthropology student, especially as I find myself pursuing my masters in the very subject.

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  • Lois Thompson
  • 2020-04-26

Beyond Anthropology 101

I bought this title expecting little more than a review of the Intro to Anthropology class I took in college decades ago and was very pleased to have gotten more than that. Or maybe I’ve forgotten that much? My college professor was a seasoned anthropologist who wore a jacket and tie in class and had rather the air of a British headmaster. Dr. Lacey also has had extensive experience in the field but his manner, his decorum, is far more casual, although both men are equally enthusiastic about their subject. I need add that I thoroughly enjoyed both of these classes. Lacey’s seemingly easy-going manner bothered me at first, but his voice is strong and easy to follow and I got over it. I never accustomed myself to him repeatedly following a noun, proper or generic, with a pronoun that refers back to it though. [Examples: Franz Boas, he...; the villagers, they....] Not a grammatical error, just a personal annoyance. Anyway, if you are interested in social sciences, buy this book.

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  • Ed Patrick
  • 2017-12-06

Fascinating introduction

I found this to be an excellent introduction to anthropology. I did however, find the professor’s grammar to be distracting from the story itself. His enthusiasm and breath of knowledge partially made up for it.

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  • Patrick Gillespie
  • 2020-03-26

very liberal but good

this author is decidedly liberal and he doesn't hide it but he is full of information that is both useful and poignant. it's too bad he couldn't step back from his own culture liberalism to analyze himself a little better. still I recommend it to anyone although a conservative will have a rough time of it

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  • Glenecollins
  • 2017-08-02

Well written, read and with a great message

I enjoyed this course it is very well thought out and entertaining with only a little bias

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  • Haroldo Falcao
  • 2020-10-23

virtue signaling and political correctness

virtue signaling and political correctness tive the tone of this book. better invest in another one.

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  • Steve B.
  • 2020-05-03

Absolutely Fantastic..

His tone and style for these lectures were awe inspiring.. I am an aspiring doctoral student and hope to emulate his energy, candor, and wisdom. Truly inspiring ! ~ Steven Baum

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  • Teeg
  • 2020-01-29

An A+ for The Great Courses

An engaging and comprehensive introduction to the study of world cultures and societies. Offers a valuable wider perspective on the problems facing the world today.

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  • Jen
  • 2020-01-03

Fantastic

This course is very informative engaging. I highly recommend this to anyone who is interested in anthropology.